Need Help - PLEASE!

Discussion in 'General Wireless Discussion' started by Bonamassa_Blues, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Bonamassa_Blues

    Bonamassa_Blues New Around Here

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    First time poster, and in need of some help. Up front I must admit that my knowledge with this stuff is very limited.

    Here is my layout:

    - 2 story house (built in 1994).
    - Have Verizon FIOS (triple play package)
    - Currently using latest router/modem combo from FIOS (Actiontec MI424WR - Red color)

    2nd story - Co-ax from my office into FIOS router/modem (I use Ethernet cat-5E to my iMac). Connection speed that we pay for with FIOS is 35/35, when tested it comes back 43/30 on speedtest site, and the range on my laptop via wi-fi is around 15-20/10-15.

    1st floor - Wife's office, wi-fi signal is good in this spot. But if she moves to living room area, it goes down to 2-3 bars (and cuts out now and then). We also have our 60'' LCD in living room with apple tv and blu-ray player. Connection can be spotty at times with these, but not terrible.

    Basement - Panny 3D Plasma, Panny 3D Blu-Ray, and Xbox-360 (with wi-fi connector). I'm most interested in improving this Xbox connection. While it isn't horrible, when I test the connection down in the basement via wi-fi it is substantially lower than in my office (at least 50% lower).

    So my questions are this (again I don't know much about this stuff)...

    1. Should I invest in a better router? This one (http://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Dual-Band-Wireless-N-Router-RT-N56U/dp/B0049YQVHE) tested extremely high on this site on both the WAN-LAN throughput & Total Simultaneous Throughput.

    2. Should I try and install myself an Ethernet jack from my office to my wifes office? Her office is right below mine, and we have a phone jack that runs directly above/below (can I substitute this, is that even possible)?

    3. Instead of a new router, should I just buy an access point to put down in the 1st floor or basement?

    4. With FIOS I've got to keep the actiontec in use even if I buy a new router, does anyone have any experience with best practices when it comes to FIOS.

    5. Am I missing any other technology that might help me? Or any tips/tricks any of you can provide?

    I really appreciate all of the help and advice you all give on this site. It is very helpful!
     
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  3. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    You are always better off using Ethernet vs. any form of wireless if you want a fast, stable network connection. Next options in order of throughput and stability are MoCA and Powerline.
     
  4. Bonamassa_Blues

    Bonamassa_Blues New Around Here

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    I realize that, I'm just trying to figure out a few things...

    Such as, do most people replace their FIOS router/modem combo they give to you the customer? And if anyone has experience setting up ethernet wiring in your house (mine is all co-ax).

    I really would like to add ethernet jacks in 2-3 of my rooms. I've read that you can run an ethernet cable directly from your ONT FIOS box on the outside of your house. I'm thinking I could run that into the house and try and run that into the basement/wife's office on 1st floor.

    Also, if I run an ethernet directly from the FIOS ONT box I believe you don't need the FIOS Actiontec router/modem they give you. And that you can use any router (Asus black diamond in this case) with no hiccups or having to bridge to FIOS router.
     
  5. Bonamassa_Blues

    Bonamassa_Blues New Around Here

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    Another thing, if I bump up my FIOS connection to 75-35 will they come and install ethernet for free?
     
  6. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    I can't say what "most people" do. I seriously doubt that Verizon will install Ethernet no matter what service level you select.

    You can get an Electrician to pull the cables and then terminate the connections yourself if you want. Or you can get a data contractor to do both.

    FIOS uses MOCA from the outside box to the router inside. That's why there
    is a coax cable that connects to the router.
     
  7. coxhaus

    coxhaus Very Senior Member

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    Ethernet cable is always best as stated above. If you install your cable yourself make sure you get cable rated for outside for the outside portion of the cabling. Indoor cat5e does not due well outside in the weather.
    There is no one best way for an install. Pick a way and do it. You can always make changes as the cabling evolves.
     
  8. devnull

    devnull Regular Contributor

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    Some do replace it, I'd bet that most don't. Running ethernet cable can be difficult, but it depends completely on the construction of your house. You can expect to have to do some drilling and re-sealing. A common practice for ethernet cabling is to run two cables to each drop. Having options for future expansion is always a good idea.

    The ethernet jack on the ONT is intended for your router only. When they enable the ethernet port, they always disable the coax ethernet connection, so it's useless for a PC.

    You can elect to use your own router for internet, but Verizon's router is needed for the TV STBs. They can only get their guide information and video-on-demand from the Verizon router, so it has to be hooked up to the coax. Some functionality can be lost depending on the configuration.

    Here is a guide made by the DSLreports.com forum.
    http://secure.dslreports.com/faq/16077
     
  9. stevech

    stevech Part of the Furniture

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    Perhaps a different Verizon region uses different technology. Here in So. Calif. the set top boxes are stand-alone; no ethernet, no IP data. They get their guide info via the cable system. No router or IP. No ethernet connection. The reverse-direction-data for video on demand, and more importantly here, switched-digital-video, uses the coax with a return frequency (different than cable modem uplinks). These set top boxes work whether or not I use their ISP service...

    My cable modem from Verizon is totally independent of of their cable TV/guide service. I use my own router with their modem; I don't want to own the modem due to finger-pointing.

    I thought most all set-top boxes worked as I describe, above; perhaps not.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
  10. tipstir

    tipstir Very Senior Member

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    Steve, not that bad to own your own modem. No finger pointing with Comcast and me. I save over $84 a year in rental charges. It's the same Modem the peddle for rental charges per month. The only differences is I own it! Order it online, called up Comcast Tech support they added the modem so I can internet. Cost of the modem was less than what they were going to charge me for rental.

    They update for me also... D3 modem better to own then rent!
     
  11. devnull

    devnull Regular Contributor

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    Yes, but the context of the topic is with FIOS service. FIOS is only related to Verizon cable by the fact that they're the same company. FIOS STBs and IP phone devices are quite dependent on the Verizon router.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
  12. stevech

    stevech Part of the Furniture

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    I missed that FIOS vs. Verizon cable modem. Oops.
     

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