2 WAN and 2 isolated LAN on single router advice needed.

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st923

Occasional Visitor
A friend of mine decided to install his business-related server in his home. He has two ISP at home. One ISP provide 500mb+ of bandwitch, and second is solid 100mb for failover.
Currently he have a mess of old routers in his house, two first floors are served with first ISP, two second are served with another, the networks are even not connected.
Devices he have are: 2 NetGear R7000 and one Xiaomi AX3600
The server will be accessed from 3 separate branches of his business, the server will connect itself to each of them through VPN, there will be RDP access through this VPNs to the server and it's very important home network would never be accessed from the server.

So, the needed configuration is as I see:
1. Both providers connect to single entry router.
2. His "business" server connects by wire to the entry router on the separate isolated "work" VLAN
3. Other ports of the entry router are allocated to "home" VLAN, with switches and additional routers on the floors for wifi coverage.

Is it possible to may be install some third-party firmware on NetGear R7000 to use it as the entry router for configuration described above? If not, what should he purchase for it to do the job.
I have old Asus RT-AC66U with Merlin lying somewhere. Would it do the job?
 

eibgrad

Very Senior Member
I don't understand why this requires a *single* router as a point of entry, esp. when a) these are completely separate ISPs w/ presumably their own modems and routers, and b) you want to keep the two networks separated. Isn't that exactly what you already have?! So either I'm missing the point, or there's something else in these requirements that's not been made fully clear.
 
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st923

Occasional Visitor
I don't understand why this requires a *single* router as a point of entry, esp. when a) these are completely separate ISPs w/ presumably their own modems and routers, and b) you want to keep the two networks separated. Isn't that exactly what you already have?! So either I'm missing the point, or there's something else in these requirements that's not been made fully clear.
1. Both ISP are just ethernet cable entering the house.
2. Both "home" and "work" networks need to use both ISP's
 

eibgrad

Very Senior Member
If this is just a load-balancing and/or failover, dual WAN issue, then don't mess around w/ consumer grade equipment. Esp. if this involves a business! Use high quality, business-grade equipment specifically designed for these purposes. I would *never* risk my business on anything less. Anything at the consumer level, even running third-party firmware, is NOT to be trusted when it comes to something of this complexity. Not when it involves a business. In some cases, hiring a consultant might make sense as well (despite the cost).
 

st923

Occasional Visitor
I do think too this is not a very good idea, but this is what we get. The alternative I had objected against was just to put the server in home network and directly expose its RDP port to the internet.
The server will be at that house and I just need to setup this somehow as best as it's possible with consumer level equipment.
 
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