Advice on small business router

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Wesley Chapman

Occasional Visitor
Hi,
My friends have a small business and want to set up networking at their shop. I'm trying to keep cost and complexity to a minimum.
I'm ok with home networking, in fact I thought I was pretty darn good at it until I changed out my Netgear WNDR4000 for a Cisco RV320. That was humbling but I got though it successfully.
My friends are computer literate as in, they know how to turn on a computer and open a browser window, so they think I'm a computer master.
They don't need an enterprise grade network, just a simple network to connect some computers, some printers, a Nas or two and eventually some security cams with NVR.

Since I'm familiar with the Cisco RV units I was going to use an RV 320 or 345 but right now they are unobtainium or crazy expensive.

What would be a good alternate to the RV 320/345? I don't want integrated wireless and multi-wan isn't necessary, but would be nice.

Thanks
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
wireless or wired only ?
Budget ?
Are they physically away from other offices/business or a shared facility ?
Do they need access from the outside to the NAS units or PCs ?
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
I'm trying to keep cost and complexity to a minimum.

I run a few Cisco RV345 units in Dual WAN configuration and Cisco PoE APs. They are older devices and pricey, but very reliable. I never had a single failure for >3 years. The setup is very simple with available PoE ports. All the same hardware makes the support easy for me. No big security concerns since I control all the clients and 90% of the traffic is to local NAS.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
Only a fool uses consumer-grade HW/SW for a business connection.

Harsh, but very true. Home router from BestBuy or Amazon with two expected lifetime firmware updates or on perpetual beta firmware gives an idea what the business is and how much the owner cares about it. Today's home routers are manufactured as cheap as possible with planned obsolescence.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
@Wesley Chapman - might consider the TP-Link Omada product line.

One can get the edge router, a switch, and a couple of AP's for a fairly decent price.
 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
You can still buy the Cisco RV340 router. It is very reliable and not that expensive. I would recommend the RV340 over the RV320 routers. I think the RV320 has reached EOS, end of sale.
 

HighCommand

New Around Here
Hi,
My friends have a small business and want to set up networking at their shop. I'm trying to keep cost and complexity to a minimum.
I'm ok with home networking, in fact I thought I was pretty darn good at it until I changed out my Netgear WNDR4000 for a Cisco RV320. That was humbling but I got though it successfully.
My friends are computer literate as in, they know how to turn on a computer and open a browser window, so they think I'm a computer master.
They don't need an enterprise grade network, just a simple network to connect some computers, some printers, a Nas or two and eventually some security cams with NVR.

Since I'm familiar with the Cisco RV units I was going to use an RV 320 or 345 but right now they are unobtainium or crazy expensive.

What would be a good alternate to the RV 320/345? I don't want integrated wireless and multi-wan isn't necessary, but would be nice.

Thanks
Another poster mentioned the TP-Link Omada system. I am using it on my network. I have router, a main switch, a PoE switch, hardware controller and 2 access points. It is very easy to set up and manage and can probably handle what your friend needs. My network supports 2 NAS units, a network printer, network scanner, 2 media servers, 2 DNS servers with ad blocking, more than dozen IOT devices and 16 other clients (PC's, tablets, phones, IP cameras, etc.) and a guest network.

If they are considering NVR they should think about POE which will also make access point setup easier. Planning for it before the network is deployed is likely going to be the lowest cost approach. There are other SDN solutions, I went with the Omada system because I felt it was easier to setup and manage (I am not a network engineer) and for lower total cost.
 

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