AIMESH NETWORK LAYOUT

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JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
Which one of the two sketches is the best layout? Will they even work? Is the second with two switches an illegal loop?
thanks,
jts
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1624074536707.png
 
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oldguy

Occasional Visitor
Both seem wrong, without knowing the configuration data.
the first has 2.5Gb and WAN connected to the primary router, which seems to be a problem unless the second unit is an access point with a Dual Wan configuration. If the second unit is an access point with Dual wan, this is the best setup.
If it is supposed to be an AI mesh device its has a circular path unless there is a way to configure static routes to the NAS

the second is a complete cluster duck of the first order but with managed switches or static routes might work.

there is a much simpler way to configure this setup depending on the location of the NAS and recorder
Sounds like a fun project
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
I'm not the expert on this, but wouldn't the 2.5GHz connection between the router and node be bidirectional (over 1Gbps in each direction simultaneously?) and more for system management/extending the WAN connection?
I'm also (probably mistakenly) under the impression that looping switches is also a positive in terms of LAN redundancy, giving LAN flow options as to how best to travel and why Spanning Tree Protocol was implemented?
OK - I looked it up and this has a lot to chew on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanning_Tree_Protocol
If I read and grokked that all correctly, I'm thinking it might be best to double the connection between each switch and from each switch to the associated router - the 2.5Ghz backhaul connection is wide/fast enough.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
Neither, they're both terrible designs fraught with problems.
I believe you. I'm running 2 ethernet cables today to replace a single defective one, so now I have different possiblities, and am looking for solutions to utilize them.
I need redundency without looping. Suggestions, anyone?
I should have labeled the router on the right as an Aimesh node.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
How about this one then?
Should the routers be connected with the two ethernet cables, with one in the 2.5Gbs ports as shown?
Current wired load does not necessarily require switches, which are unmanaged. Should I let the routers take care of switching until capacity, then add switches for future clients?
thanks,
jts
1624109874859.png
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
waitasecond - the 2.5 backhaul from router to node: isnt that a specific port out of the router into the WAN port of the node? there's a double path there in the diagram possibly for no reason?
(I was wondering about your cable pull...let us know how that goes please)
 

bbunge

Part of the Furniture
Drop the second backhaul. Use just the 2.5 GB for backhaul. But if the rest of your LAN is GIG just use the router LAN port to mesh WAN port. and use the mesh for WIFI. If you have a second cable run it to the switch for your wired clients.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
waitasecond - the 2.5 backhaul from router to node: isnt that a specific port out of the router into the WAN port of the node? there's a double path there in the diagram possibly for no reason?
(I was wondering about your cable pull...let us know how that goes please)
Yes, sir, the cable is stuck. I think something, like a big truck in my yard, collapsed the 3/4" pvc on it. I'm running a new double ethernet direct bury in a new route.

I wasn't sure how the backhaul cable worked in the 2.5Gbs ports, if that was all it needed. If I hadn't got to looking at diagrams for networks, I would have left it alone I reckon. Trying to hook it up to the best advantage.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
Drop the second backhaul. Use just the 2.5 GB for backhaul. But if the rest of your LAN is GIG just use the router LAN port to mesh WAN port. and use the mesh for WIFI. If you have a second cable run it to the switch for your wired clients.
Thanks. Should I go from router to switch to switch, or from router to switch & router to switch?
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
Your call. No managed switch between router and mesh node, though.
Based on you guys comments, then, this seems the most efficient?
1624132472545.png
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
I would run a Router + AP. It works always and allows more control over the AP. Not impressed by AiMesh - no way to control the power and channels on the node. Each router can have it's own switch, if more LAN ports are needed. One cable between the routers; two small UPS for better protection.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
I would run a Router + AP. It works always and allows more control over the AP. Not impressed by AiMesh - no way to control the power and channels on the node. Each router can have it's own switch, if more LAN ports are needed. One cable between the routers; two small UPS for better protection.
I tried an AP for a short while in the beginning. I've got mixed feelings between it and Aimesh. It seems both have advantages.
I like, for instance, walking from my nearby office to my home and my iphone switches routers transparently without a hickup. It may do the same with an Access Point, however. It may be my best option. There is a little more control over the node with the new Aimesh tab, but not as much as I would like.
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
It may do the same with an Access Point, however.

I found no differences in roaming between AP and node. The node is just more fancy repeater (wireless) or AP (wired). The only true advantage is Guest Network to nodes, but it needs more work. You have two options, find the one working better for your needs.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
I found no differences in roaming between AP and node. The node is just more fancy repeater (wireless) or AP (wired). The only true advantage is Guest Network to nodes, but it needs more work. You have two options, find the one working better for your needs.
I'm really using it as an AP now kinda. I don't have a true mesh, just two good AX routers connected with ethernet, or have been connected until the lightning incident. But will be today, even if temporary. I had another router in the mesh before, but took it out because it was an overkill. House is 1200 sq ft, office is 900 sq feet, being about 80' apart as the crow files. 1 good router will reach beyond the limits of both, just a little too far apart for a single router.
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
Yes, sir, the cable is stuck. I think something, like a big truck in my yard, collapsed the 3/4" pvc on it. I'm running a new double ethernet direct bury in a new route.

I wasn't sure how the backhaul cable worked in the 2.5Gbs ports, if that was all it needed. If I hadn't got to looking at diagrams for networks, I would have left it alone I reckon. Trying to hook it up to the best advantage.
ugh, collapsed conduit is a tragedy.
 

JT Strickland

Very Senior Member
From experience - pigeons can carry larger files.
Oops, typo. They got shot at too! And some folks used to hunt crow, too. I don't think either is very endangered at the present.

Pertinent to this thread (I hope I haven't doubled up on anything) is
thanks,
jts
 

Clark Griswald

Senior Member
Ahh, but what is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow vs carrying a file the size of a coconut?
Royal Debate
 
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