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Amplify antenna signal or amplify signal from Moca Adapter distribution splitter

Robert Tomas

New Around Here
Getting ready to cut the cord from my full blown cable services using Internet 100 services provided by the same service provider. I will be installing an attic antenna for OTA channels, Tablo, moca adapters and Roku Ultras. While I have researched a lot and have my cable wiring and device plan pretty well defined I am still thinking about amplification requirements

A few questions reference signal amplification.

1) What signal strength should I be looking for from the ISP? I'll ask them to measure when they do the install. Am I correct assuming this is measured as a db signal strenth like traditional cble tv signal?
2) I assume I will likely need to or should amplify the OTA signal from the antenna before it feeds into the Tablo. I will test for this need when I install a test loop (not-amplified) directly to my smart TV/Tablo that has a signal strength and quality measure. My current cable service does have multiple splitters and an amplifier in the attic before distributing to drops that include another splitter. I know overdriving signal is not good.
3) Should I also need to be concerned with amplifying the signal from the moca adapter coax out (moca is fed out of the wired router) to the house distribution splitter? This is only a 20' run of rg6. Or would this be redundant/overkill?
4) Do the Moca ready amplified splitters (like PCT-MAB-F14P) amplify both the tv signal and moca signals?
Sorry for so many questions.
 

krkaufman

Senior Member
Do the Moca ready amplified splitters (like PCT-MAB-F14P) amplify both the tv signal and moca signals?
MoCA has built-in power adjustment, up to a point.

As for amps, consider that amplification is between the input port and outputs ... and that nearly every “designed for MoCA” amplifier will have a built-in “PoE” MoCA filter on the input port — so MoCA signals will be blocked from passing through the amplifier input. (Non-MoCA amps lack the built-in MoCA filter on the input port, but typically severely attenuate MoCA signals between the input and outputs.) Amps designed for MoCA typically include a built-in “PoE” MoCA filter, and will be spec’d to have lower loss at MoCA frequencies between output ports, and may also allow for the MoCA signal to bypass the amp circuitry and flow between the amplified and passive output ports.

Bottom line: Any amplification of the TV or cable signal should happen outside (above) the coax carrying MoCA signals, where “designed for MoCA” amps effectively meet this requirement when installed at the top of the coax hierarchy.
 
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degrub

Very Senior Member
What is the cable length and number of connections between the antenna and the tuner ?

An OTA TV signal amp should be placed as close to the antenna as physically possible. ChannelMaster makes several very good amps for both indoor amd outdoor use. The signal will be weaker inside your attic than if it is outdoors on a mast. IF there is any radiation blocking film on the underside of the roof decking, it may be impossible to get a good signal. Line of sight is important as well as getting the antenna pointed at the transmission mast location.

What is the distance to the TV transmission tower ?
There are online websites to determine distance and angle. Inside the attic, you will have to increase the size of the antenna by at least one "range" distance grouping due to signal attenuation.

Then that output can be connected to the MOCA cable network without issue.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
1) What signal strength should I be looking for from the ISP? I'll ask them to measure when they do the install. Am I correct assuming this is measured as a db signal strenth like traditional cble tv signal?
If you are talking about a DOCSIS cable modem then the signal strength is not something that the end user would usually fret over. The exact level will vary depending on the specific equipment being used. Part of the installation process that the technician does when installing the cable modem is to make sure the signal levels are correct. From an end user's perspective they only need to be concerned about Post RS errors. If you are seeing errors there it might indicate that the signal level has gone out of range (due to a fault or change in the ISP's network) in which case a call to the ISP is required.

https://community.virginmedia.com/t...ICAL-PRIMER-updated-October-2016/td-p/2271297
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
2) I assume I will likely need to or should amplify the OTA signal from the antenna before it feeds into the Tablo. I will test for this need when I install a test loop (not-amplified) directly to my smart TV/Tablo that has a signal strength and quality measure. My current cable service does have multiple splitters and an amplifier in the attic before distributing to drops that include another splitter. I know overdriving signal is not good.
A low-noise pre-amp (modest amplification even when you can get by without it) at the antenna connection in the attic has always helped my in-metro area reception. The signal boost helps avoid dips that can disrupt digital signal processing, and has improved the image and speed of channel switching on my tuner.

If you perform the attic install during the winter, you may discover signals are a bit weaker during the summer when the leaves are on.

A distribution amplifier at the coax hub may or may not be required depending on the cable lengths and dB drops at connections. A splice will drop 0.5 dB, splitters will drop 3.5 or 7.0 dB. Minimize the number of these devices. If you only need to send the signal to a few locations, try using a 2- or 3-way splitter instead of a many port distribution amplifier, which will amplify noise and signal.

Don't forget the safety Earth grounds at each incoming connection. I think you can skip grounding the attic antenna(?). The grounds should connect directly to the building Earth ground; if a second Earth ground is installed, it should be bonded to the building Earth ground to preclude a potential difference, circulating currents, and ensuing noise.

OE
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
Check the NEC code current version for earthing requirements.
Outside, you definitely have to have a lightning spark block and bonding cable direct to the electric service panel earthing rod. The code specifies all of the details. If you have any doubts get an antenna installer to do the work.

The antenna manufacturer may give guidance for an indoor installation.
 

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