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ASUS AIMESH & Powerline Adapter Together

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Clinkscale2

New Around Here
Hey all I’m hoping I’m posting in the correct sub-forum and following the rules.

I’m very new to the technology world and have a few questions. I have recently built a house on my parents land that sits 100-150ft from the original house that has my router in the basement. There are no data lines run to the new build and digging a trench isn’t possible right now.

My question is I’m looking to upgrade to an ASUS AC3100 or a GT-AC5300 in my basement and somehow get WiFi into the new build with enough power to use PC to game. Hence the Powerline adapter. But is it possible to have both the AIMesh and Power line working together. Thank you
 
Hey all I’m hoping I’m posting in the correct sub-forum and following the rules.

I’m very new to the technology world and have a few questions. I have recently built a house on my parents land that sits 100-150ft from the original house that has my router in the basement. There are no data lines run to the new build and digging a trench isn’t possible right now.

My question is I’m looking to upgrade to an ASUS AC3100 or a GT-AC5300 in my basement and somehow get WiFi into the new build with enough power to use PC to game. Hence the Powerline adapter. But is it possible to have both the AIMesh and Power line working together. Thank you

My unqualified thoughts...

Possible but more likely a complication.

Investigate how well powerline works across circuit panels, sub-panels, and/or transformers. Without knowing your conditions, I would not be hopeful.

Maybe you could slit and bury an Ethernet cable, or coax cable for use with MOCA adapters.

Also investigate a wireless bridge.

OE
 
Two additional routers with the main Router connected to a Media Bridge to the new house Router would be the best bet with simple-to-use equipment that would be resellable after you get that trench dug.

Digging a trench is still cheaper and will give maximum throughput and lowest latency with no chance of interference reductions from neighbors AP's too.

To do this right wirelessly, a point to point transmitter and receiver combination would be better for long-term use. @Trip would have some excellent suggestions here for you later, I'm sure. :)

Since you specifically mention gaming. Anything less than wired at that distance will not be satisfactory (low latency is wired territory, sheer throughput isn't enough). :)

Edit. Fixed spelling (resealable is now resellable). :)
 
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Digging a trench is still cheaper and will give maximum throughput and lowest latency with no chance of interference reductions from neighbors AP's too.

When Spectrum buries a new coax cable to the house, a tech hooks it up and leaves it laying across the ground to the house for 100's of feet. Then a couple days later, two grunts show up and stomp a slit into the turf about 8" deep, stuff the cable into it, and stomp it closed... done in 30 minutes. No trench digging required.

OE
 
To answer your first question, both powerline and mesh can operate simultaneously within the same network. They are not mutually exclusive. That said, as @OzarkEdge mentioned, powerline is iffy and behavior can vary widely: it could work immediately, not work at all, cut in and out at random and/or degrade over time, or a combination of any of that behavior. Long story short, you have to try it and see, and potentially try multiple models based on different chipset brands (Broadcom or Qualcomm) to see which one will work best with your electrical circuitry. I generally don't recommend it as a networking method for the above reasons, but if you feel as though you have no other choice, then have at it I suppose.

This moves us to hard-wiring ethernet or fiber. Even if you can't trench it now, I'd propose a surface run of burial-rated Cat6, or fiber if the buildings use different electrical feeds, laying it either bare or inside something like SealProof flexible conduit (two 100-ft rolls for $50 each plus one coupler). Remember to leave an adequate service loop of cable at either end of the run, for routing into each house, termination, placement and possible re-termination/relocation.

If wiring is not an option, then I would go with a wireless point-to-point link (instead of powerline), but understand that gaming may suffer from the added latency, jitter and/or packet loss from the wireless link. Presuming that's tolerable, I'd go with a 802.11ac 5Ghz product, probably a pre-paired set of two radios to make setup easier, such as the Ubiquiti LiteBeam Gen2 pair ($149), plus a pair of gigabit PoE injectors. You'd mount each to the closest points on each house that give you the cleanest line-of-sight between both radios, then power on both, adjust for alignment, and you're done.

So those are your options, in a nutshell.
 
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I am currently running AiMesh using 86U and 1900P. They are connected using a Netgear PLP1200 setup. It is working great. The main limitation on the powerline adapters is they really need to be ideally on the same “leg” of the wiring of your building or house for best results.
 

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