ASUS current routers going to support WIFI 6E?

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Logicez

New Around Here
If I will buy right now AX router, it will give support to WIFI 6E when it was available?
Or it was better that I wait right now?

and I dont know If I need AX router...

The 6E is true new band? (6Ghz) and faster than 5Ghz for browsing?

thanks.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
For browsing? Can't see how it would be faster? But it should be faster for doing backups to a local NAS. :)

There is no guarantee that a current router will support the future standard.

What router do you have now? How heavily utilized is the network? How many devices do you have wired/wireless?
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
If I will buy right now AX router, it will give support to WIFI 6E when it was available?
Or it was better that I wait right now?

and I dont know If I need AX router...

The 6E is true new band? (6Ghz) and faster than 5Ghz for browsing?

thanks.

Just wait.

OE
 

sanke1

Senior Member
Asus has no plans to enable 6Ghz on current routers. How will they sell new models at significant ripoff prices then?
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
If I will buy right now AX router, it will give support to WIFI 6E when it was available?

No, it requires hardware changes.

Sent from my SM-T720 using Tapatalk
 

Logicez

New Around Here
No, it requires hardware changes.

Sent from my SM-T720 using Tapatalk

I read some comments that say it was going to support maybe.. and other comments that it requires hardware changes..
why ASUS do not that on their expensive ones? so why the price so high?

I think that because it was same 802.11ax but with few new frequencies so why it was dont support?
AC is not worth it today? but their prices was same I think to AX.

right now I have some ISP router.. not very good... with 2 AP that connected wired to my computers..
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
So dont worth it buy now router?
Many ISP provided routers have very poor WiFi. The good news is that you don't need to buy the latest-and-most-expensive router to get better WiFi.

Trying to "future proof" WiFi is not a smart strategy. The technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace. My advice has always been to not buy products when they first come out and to stay a generation (or two) behind.

Right now, AC routers provide the best value and essentially the same performance as AX routers, especially if you have no AX devices.

Even if you have an AX device (or two), you are unlikely to see a significant performance benefit in most cases.

So go ahead and buy an AC router. But set a budget and factor in that you will probably replace the router with an WiFi6 or 6E model in 2 or 3 years, when the technology has had a chance to go through its first generation and come down in price.
 

Going_Strong

Occasional Visitor
Myself, I recently bought an AX router, the Archer AX11000. When I set it up and connected with my three AX clients (PCs with Archer TX3000E aka Intel AX200 wi-fi cards), the step up in speed was instantaneous - and considerable, by 40% to 50% when compared to what I got with my Archer C5400X.

Non-AX clients are about as speedy/slow as they were before, but I do think the new router has slightly better range. And that’s saying a lot, because the C5400X is phenomenal when it comes to range.

The C5400X is now a backup, while I also bought a second AX11000 and set it up as an access point in order to use its 2.5 G WAN port to connect as LAN to my PC. Now the speeds on my PC are crazy (much like this guy's here: https://mightygadget.co.uk/tp-link-archer-ax11000-tri-band-wi-fi-6-gaming-router-review/).

But do I need these speeds? Or, more to the point, could I live without them? Probably yes, however seeing as I copy lots of data across my network, I find the increase very beneficial.

So, in a nutshell: it’s up to you to decide. I can recommend the switch. It sure is costly, but you'll find yourself on another planet speed-wise.


PS Can’t vouch for Asus routers, although logic would dictate that the experience should be similar.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
When I set it up and connected with my three AX clients (PCs with Archer TX3000E aka Intel AX200 wi-fi cards), the step up in speed was instantaneous - and considerable, by 40% to 50% when compared to what I got with my Archer C5400X.
Are you using 160 MHz channels with the AX200's?
 

Going_Strong

Occasional Visitor
No - I can only set 160 MHz on the router, and I've done accordingly on the AX11000. The C5400X doesn't support 160 MHz channels.
PS The Intel driver for the AX200 (21.80.2 as of today) doesn't allow you to chose 160 MHz, it only gives you the option, for 5 GHz, of "Automatic" (which I'm currently on) or "20 MHz".
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
No - I can only set 160 MHz on the router, and I've done accordingly on the AX11000. The C5400X doesn't support 160 MHz channels.
The wider bandwidth is mostly responsible for your higher 5 GHz throughput. You should also see an almost 2X gain on 2.4 GHz, due to higher link rates.

160 MHz channel support is harder to find on AC routers. The NETGEAR R7800 is one of the few that support it.
 

Going_Strong

Occasional Visitor
The wider bandwidth is mostly responsible for your higher 5 GHz throughput. You should also see an almost 2X gain on 2.4 GHz, due to higher link rates.

160 MHz channel support is harder to find on AC routers. The NETGEAR R7800 is one of the few that support it.

Thanks for the explanation. :)
So, AX in and of itself would be responsible for how much of the increase - 30%/40% (as a rough estimate)?
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
Thanks for the explanation. :)
So, AX in and of itself would be responsible for how much of the increase - 30%/40% (as a rough estimate)?
Very little for 5 GHz because QAM 1024 link rates were already used in 802.11ac.

For 2.4 GHz, the higher link rates are the prime reason. They were not supported in 802.11ac and there is no wider bandwidth available.

This article has some 80/160 MHz bandwidth comparisons.
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
Very little for 5 GHz because QAM 1024 link rates were already used in 802.11ac.

And it will also depend on what you are upgrading from. Moving from a mid-range to another mid-range model should yield very little improvement. But if you are coming from an entry-level AC router and moving to a high-end AX router, the jump in the number of streams, the quality of the amplifiers/filters, the antenna design, all of these may provide a positive impact. I would expect an increase in the number of streams to have a potential positive impact even if your clients are only 2x2 because of the increase in antenna diversity.

As pointed out by Tim, many ISP-provided routers have very poor wifi implementations. Going from a Bell-provided Sagemcom to a 400$ Asus router would most certainly provide improvements both in range and in speed - hard to quantify these however.
 

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