AX86U internal antenna orientation/direction

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Qbcd

Regular Contributor
Hello,

My first post here. I just bought an AX86U and I'd like to optimize antenna orientation so the donuts cover my space as efficiently as possible. The AX86U has a 4th 5 GHz internal antenna and I'm trying to figure how how it's oriented. I found this image of the PCB:

Antennas.png


The upper one is the AX86U and the lower one is the AC86U with the internal antennas highlighted in yellow (I wanted to include both models for reference, but I really care about the AX86U). Could someone who knows more about antennas than me let me know which way you think the signal is projecting from that antenna? It's rectangular so that tells me it's directional, so maybe a cone going out perpendicular to the front and back side of the router without much going to the sides or up/down? Does that make sense? And if it's not directional but is omni-directional, which way is the donut oriented? Any informed opinion is highly appreciated, thank you!
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
As an educated guess, it would be the same orientation as the other three antennae when they are pointing straight up.
 

Qbcd

Regular Contributor
As an educated guess, it would be the same orientation as the other three antennae when they are pointing straight up.
You think? But it's a very different shape. Aren't omni-directional antennas stick-like, this has rectangular elements.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
I would hope. And experimenting with the previous RT-AC86U shows this to be the case in most normal Wi-Fi environments.
 

krum

Regular Contributor
I experimented with mine I have them like this \ | /
 

Qbcd

Regular Contributor
Well it makes sense they would make it omnidirectional and put it in the most default orientation which is straight up. But it looks so different from regular omnidirectional antennas. I wish I knew more about antenna design, it's a niche topic and I can't find much information about it online.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture

SoCalReviews

Very Senior Member
The optimal size and shape of the antenna is dependent on the frequency it is being utilized for. Just because an antenna is square in shape and small in size doesn't mean it can't be as effective as a taller external antenna which is why smaller Wifi devices can achieve the signal reception they do. Consider also that a modern wireless router's 5Ghz band radio effectiveness relies more on reflections and slight signal time delays created within the environment to achieve improved throughput.
 
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Qbcd

Regular Contributor
The optimal size and shape of the antenna is dependent on the frequency it is being utilized for. Just because an antenna is square in shape and small in size doesn't mean it can't be as effective as a taller external antenna which is why smaller Wifi devices can achieve the signal reception they do. Consider also that a modern wireless router's 5Ghz band radio effectiveness relies more on reflections and slight signal time delays created within the environment to achieve improved throughput.
I see, thank you. Yeah, my understanding is that antenna shape or size doesn't really have an effect on transmission/reception strength since they're all limited by law, but a higher gain antenna will give you better reception/transmission in a certain direction. But for most people, horizontal gain will be more valuable than vertical, so antennas that project in that flattened donut-shape are useful. Antenna shape doesn't matter then, I still would like to know the signal pattern of that internal antenna on the AX86U, but I guess I'll just assume is the same as the other ones when they're pointing up.
 

chatr

Occasional Visitor
Also its predecessor AC86U has 3 external antennas 1 internal antenna. I don't know why they just don't have 4 external ones.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Three looks better. :)
 

SoCalReviews

Very Senior Member
Also its predecessor AC86U has 3 external antennas 1 internal antenna. I don't know why they just don't have 4 external ones.
Three external is a more compact design and because only the 5Ghz radio (4 x 4) uses four antennas on the AX86U... the internal antenna works well for the 5Ghz range wave legnth along with the three external antennas that are shared for use with the 2.4Ghz radio (3 x 3).
 
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SoCalReviews

Very Senior Member
I see, thank you. Yeah, my understanding is that antenna shape or size doesn't really have an effect on transmission/reception strength since they're all limited by law, but a higher gain antenna will give you better reception/transmission in a certain direction. But for most people, horizontal gain will be more valuable than vertical, so antennas that project in that flattened donut-shape are useful. Antenna shape doesn't matter then, I still would like to know the signal pattern of that internal antenna on the AX86U, but I guess I'll just assume is the same as the other ones when they're pointing up.
Yes, the external antennas can be physically adjusted (oriented) and optimized while fixed internal antennas can't be. I believe having larger antennas would be more important for the 2.4Ghz wave length than for 5Ghz. There is always a trade off with larger antennas... While they can offer a greater surface area for transmit/receive they can also be more prone to external noise and interference. You want a design that is optimized for the bands you are using within the limited physical area you are covering and with most consumer wireless routers this would be the area of a medium to large sized home or small business.
 
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