Better throughput and how does homeplug actually work??

kentclar

New Around Here
Hi!
I'm looking to gain some speed in my homeplug network. I only use homeplug as a means to get a cabled connection to my TV and Apple TV which both reside in an area where I can't run a proper twisted pair ethernet cable. Oh yes and for my heat pump but the bandwidth demands of that device are miniscule .

I'm using Devolo DLAN 1200 products but I'm only getting some 200/80mbit to the TV but 400/300mbit to the heat pump which is much closer to the adapter connected to my router.

Devolo has a product that connects in your electrical junction box. Brilliant! You can't get any closer to all adapters than to be right in the middle. So I'm thinking I should get me one of those. BUT I can't get an ethernet cable to the junction box either and the way I understand it this adapter is meant to be the "primary" one.
Link: https://www.devolo.global/dlan-pro-1200-dinrail-bs

So my question now is if I'd see a higher throughput between my router connected homeplug adapter and the TV one if I had one of those junction connected adapters in the middle?

I've read through all the standards and white papers on homeplug networking but I can't seem to work out what the topology actually looks like. Does all traffic go through one central node like a switch or a router or does it work more like a wifi network where all nodes receive all signals and the one it is addressed to pick it up and the rest disgard it?

Thanks,
Kent
 

dosborne

Very Senior Member
What's your wifi situation? Would a media bridge solution be feasible as it would potentially give you better throughput.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
Are you looking for a problem to solve or is the existing working well enough ?
Seems like they’d like better speeds to the TV (and consistency across all segments).

I'm using Devolo DLAN 1200 products but I'm only getting some 200/80mbit to the TV but 400/300mbit to the heat pump which is much closer to the adapter connected to my router.
 

kentclar

New Around Here
What's your wifi situation? Would a media bridge solution be feasible as it would potentially give you better throughput.
Mm I have considered that. Problem with that is that the Samsung OneConnect box and Apple TV resides in a storage room underneath a heavy wooden staircase. When I ran wifi I only got about 30mbit throughput and that's with the access point only a few meters away :(

It's so taunting to see that I can achieve high speeds on one homeplug and only a fifth on another!

I currently run 100mbit on my internet fibre connection but that is to be upgraded to 500mbit next year, so thats the kind of throughput I'm aiming for.
 

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kentclar

New Around Here
What about coax cabling/outlet availability?
Do you mean 75 ohm coax for antennae? No we only use iptv, local storage and streaming services.

No further cabling possible in to the TV area. There's a conduit for power but obviously I can't run network cables in the same conduit as 240 volts
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
To actually answer your question, HomePlug is a shared medium and uses OFDM technology similar to what's used in 802.11ac Wi-Fi.

You can't "boost" range by adding an adapter between other adapters.

This article contains tips for troubleshooting HomePlug throughput.
 
Last edited:

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Can I ask what country you are in? The reason being that domestic wiring in the US is very different to the UK (where I am) for example. There can also differences in mains wiring depending on how old your house is, or when it was last rewired.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Thanks for the update @kentclar. I experienced a similar thing back when I was using powerline adapters. One of the wall sockets in the room was on a different circuit to another socket in the same room. Just switching over to that other socket doubled the throughput.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
So my question now is if I'd see a higher throughput between my router connected homeplug adapter and the TV one if I had one of those junction connected adapters in the middle?

HomePlug doesn't work that way...

I've read through all the standards and white papers on homeplug networking but I can't seem to work out what the topology actually looks like. Does all traffic go through one central node like a switch or a router or does it work more like a wifi network where all nodes receive all signals and the one it is addressed to pick it up and the rest disgard it?

I would compare it to a ring bus topo - each client station is on a loop, and there is a token mechanism that says when each station can transmit on to the loop.
 
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