Connect to Huwaei SUN2000 inverter using asus rt-ac68u

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Sorry, not possible with Asus or Merlin. Neither support wireless client mode. You would have to use a separate dedicated device.
 
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ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
So I should install DD_wrt or tomato to achieve the same function?
Your decision. Depends on what features you're currently using in Merlin and whether you'd loose them by switching to a different firmware.
 

RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
Client mode was broken in Freshtomato until very recently. I don't know if it was fixed in the latest release, or will be in the next release.
 
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RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Given the intended use, I don't see the need for anything beyond any router w/ client mode capabilities here. dd-wrt or freshtomato (provided it has finally solved its client mode issues) is just fine.

On a side note, I find the "how to" a bit overly complicated. The author configures the operating mode as Router (thereby disabling NAT), then applies his own NAT rules to "fool [the] inverter that the routed packets comes from the DD-WRT’s IP address."

Uhh, unless I'm missing something, had he left the router in Gateway mode (NAT enabled), all the inverter would have seen is the WAN ip of the router!

At that point, beyond disabling its DHCP server, he could have given the router a LAN ip on the same IP network as his primary router, patched it LAN to LAN wrt the primary router, and added a static route to the primary router that points to that LAN ip as the gateway to the inverter's IP network, thus making the inverter accessible from any LAN client.

All in all, pretty simple. And frankly, I don't even think this requires a router w/ third-party capability. Just so long as it supports client mode, oem/stock or third-party.
 
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KOA

Regular Contributor
Given the intended use, I don't see the need for anything beyond any router w/ client mode capabilities here. dd-wrt or freshtomato (provided it has finally solved its client mode issues) is just fine.

On a side note, I find the "how to" a bit overly complicated. The author configures the operating mode as Router (thereby disabling NAT), then applies his own NAT rules to "fool [the] inverter that the routed packets comes from the DD-WRT’s IP address."

Uhh, unless I'm missing something, had he left the router in Gateway mode (NAT enabled), all the inverter would have seen is the WAN ip of the router!

At that point, beyond disabling its DHCP server, he could have given the router a LAN ip on the same IP network as his primary router, patched it LAN to LAN wrt the primary router, and added a static route to the primary router that points to that LAN ip as the gateway to the inverter's IP network, thus making the inverter accessible from any LAN client.

All in all, pretty simple. And frankly, I don't even think this requires a router w/ third-party capability. Just so long as it supports client mode, oem/stock or third-party.
Which routers support this with stock firmware. Any suggestions would be of great help
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Your most likely candidates are any travel routers, since that's the very type of router that benefits most from client mode (aka, WISP (wireless ISP) router). Obviously a road warrior can't expect wired access to a hosted internet connection. So client mode is a virtual necessity if the manufacturer expects to sell it on that basis.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TSK26W/?tag=snbforums-20
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N5RCZQH/?tag=snbforums-20

I'm not specifically recommending these. I'm merely illustrating that travel routers are your best bet for native client mode support.

You could also pick up a cheap dd-wrt/freshtomato compatible router.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DWFPDNO/?tag=snbforums-20

I've even seen stuff like this in thrift stores from time to time too.
 
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KOA

Regular Contributor
Your most likely candidates are any travel routers, since that's the very type of router that benefits most from client mode (aka, WISP (wireless ISP) router). Obviously a road warrior can't expect wired access to a hosted internet connection. So client mode is a virtual necessity if the manufacturer expects to sell it on that basis.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073TSK26W/?tag=snbforums-20
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N5RCZQH/?tag=snbforums-20

I'm not specifically recommending these. I'm merely illustrating that travel routers are your best bet for native client mode support.

You could also pick up a cheap dd-wrt/freshtomato compatible router.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DWFPDNO/?tag=snbforums-20

I've even seen stuff like this in thrift stores from time to time too.
I need two thing from this router,
1. Client mode for connecting to Huwaei 10KTL-M1 SOLAR inverter which has a pathetic wifi connection. I am getting maximum speed - 80dbi using my laptop with Killer 1650 Wi-Fi card at the location where router will be placed. So need good range out of 2.4Ghz.
2. Good 5ghz performance bcz I will be using it to stream PLEX running on DS214play Nas.
I am mostly looking for a used router from my local online store I.e Daraz. They offer discount on Mondays so I want to buy it today.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Well now you've thrown something new into the mix.

I can understand the need for a good 2.4GHz signal for accessing the remote device. But what has the NAS, Plex, and 5GHz have to do w/ this same router?!

All I'm describing is a means to create a gateway using a second router to a device that's only accessible via its own hotspot. Beyond that, the second router doesn't serve any other purpose. But you seem to have some other vision here about its usefulness, and I fail to understand what that is. I assume your NAS is already wired to your local network. What has this secondary router and 5GHz have to do w/ it? You need to be more forthcoming about your architecture here.
 

KOA

Regular Contributor
Well now you've thrown something new into the mix.

I can understand the need for a good 2.4GHz signal for accessing the remote device. But what has the NAS, Plex, and 5GHz have to do w/ this same router?!

All I'm describing is a means to create a gateway using a second router to a device that's only accessible via its own hotspot. Beyond that, the second router doesn't serve any other purpose. But you seem to have some other vision here about its usefulness, and I fail to understand what that is. I assume your NAS is already wired to your local network. What has this secondary router and 5GHz have to do w/ it? You need to be more forthcoming about your architecture here.
My current setup is.
My FTTH Modem/router Huwaei EG8245H is main router for everything in the house. My Synology DS214PLAY NAS is connected to it via Ethernet. My TV is also connected via Ethernet. Raspberry pi 4(running a homeassistant server + FR24 Feeder) is connected via another switch on first floor. Solar inverter can only connect throught wifi, for which I had to move the raspberry pi 4 to ground floor (temporarily), but the signal are too weak for a consistent connection on rpi4 around 20 on rpi4 and - 80dbi on my laptop (a killer 1650 AX wifi card).

My plan is to use the new router next to the synology Nas and use it for both purposes I.e stream 4K videos from Synology NAS( connected via Ethernet to the new router) to my Laptop via 5ghz radios, which is usually not more 30-40 feets from the router and connect to solar inverter using 2.4ghz radio for a stable connection.
The reason being cost, any cheap travel router cost around 4000Pkr, while RT-68U and EA8500 (used) Can be had in between 3500Pkr to 4500Pkr.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
What you're now describing is a repeater (unbridged) (i.e., client mode + AP). And in that case, I'd be inclined to use something like the RT-AC68U and FreshTomato (again, assuming its long known client mode issues have been resolved). Or else DD-WRT. Any travel router is unlikely to be able to compete in terms of signal strength given the form factor. And having several RT-AC68U routers myself, I know just how capable it is for the price.
 
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eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
FYI. I got curious and decided to configure one of my spare RT-AC68U routers in the lab w/ FreshTomato 2021.5 (the most recent build as of this post), and was able to configure client mode w/ no problems, including establishing a client connection to the 5GHz radio (essentially a repeater (unbridged)). Very easy to configure.
 
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KOA

Regular Contributor
FYI. I got curious and decided to configure one of my spare RT-AC68U routers in the lab w/ FreshTomato 2021.5 (the most recent build as of this post), and was able to configure client mode w/ no problems, including establishing a client connection to the 5GHz radio (essentially a repeater (unbridged)). Very easy to configure.
That is what I am looking for, someone who has the experience with actual units to test it. My only question is now how is 68U compared to EA8500 in 5Ghz throughput performance in realworld? Bcz reviews are quiet different depending on which sites review you read.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
IMO, that's a pointless exercise. *ANY* wireless router is a crapshoot when it comes to how well it will work in YOUR environment. You can take the same router and move it to a completely different environment and get vastly different results. The only way to know for sure is to try it.

FWIW, my RT-AC68U has been fantastic. If anything, the radios are too strong, at least in *my* environment. The 2.4GHz radio reaches halfway down my street, which is no benefit to me. Obviously the 5GHz radio has a much shorter range given the limits of the freq. But at least when it is within reach, the performance has been excellent. It's why I'm still using it even today, despite the availability of more modern AC/AX routers. It meets all my current needs and is incredibly stable. I just don't need anything more.

FYI. FWIW, Merlin uses the RT-AC68U as his preferred development router.
 
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RMerlin

Asuswrt-Merlin dev
FYI. FWIW, Merlin uses the RT-AC68U as his preferred development router.
Mostly because it only takes 15 minutes to compile, versus 23-27 minutes for any of the HND models :)
 

KOA

Regular Contributor
IMO, that's a pointless exercise. *ANY* wireless router is a crapshoot when it comes to how well it will work in YOUR environment. You can take the same router and move it to a completely different environment and get vastly different results. The only way to know for sure is to try it.

FWIW, my RT-AC68U has been fantastic. If anything, the radios are too strong, at least in *my* environment. The 2.4GHz radio reaches halfway down my street, which is no benefit to me. Obviously the 5GHz radio has a much shorter range given the limits of the freq. But at least when it is within reach, the performance has been excellent. It's why I'm still using it even today, despite the availability of more modern AC/AX routers. It meets all my current needs and is incredibly stable. I just don't need anything more.

FYI. FWIW, Merlin uses the RT-AC68U as his preferred development router.
nobody has compared it to EA8500?
-----------
Only one review found.
1630336266967.png

1630336312806.png
 
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