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Cutting the cord...need help on final buy list

Discussion in 'Wireless Buying Advice' started by rymc, Jan 22, 2019.

  1. rymc

    rymc New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Good morning everyone! Sorry for the long-winded post below. I've come to this forum by recommendation through an Amazon review (hey, "One Happy Dude", if you're here!) so I thought I'd come to ask for help from people that know what they're really talking about. While I generally follow along with things, I'm feeling a bit unsure, so just looking for some advice.

    things you might want to know:
    • I'm going to cut the cable cord in March; we currently rent a modem/router combo (WHY DID I PAY FOR THIS?!)
    • I'll continue with xfinity for internet
    • I'm a console gamer
    • devices:
      • phone (2)
        tablet (2)
        computer (2)
        xbox one
        ps4
        arlo base station
        nest thermostat
        firestick (2)
        amazon dot (2)
        tp-link bulbs (4)
        tp-link plug (1)
      • I'd like to build a guest network as well
      • I'll also continue to add wi-fi bulbs/plugs to my network
    • My home is ~1100 sq. ft., a very crude drawing is here: https://imgur.com/dUzvN0m

    Issues I have with the current setup:
    • Arlo connected cameras are outside of the house (4,000 sq. ft lot) and the reception is poor
    • Consoles are laggy
    • Dropped wi-fi coverage
    I do not have the ability to run new cabling between rooms at this time (I honestly don't have the skillset to put new drops in, at this time).

    My thoughts:
    • Modem: Netgear CM1000
    • Router: Google Wi-Fi x1
    • Cat 6 cabling (CM1000 > Google Wi-Fi > Arlo)
    or
    • Modem/Router Combo: Nighthawk AC1900
    • Cat 6 cabling (AC1900 > Arlo)
    I like the Google option because it can be added to, in the future, but I do think though that it might be under powered for everything connected to it? Would I be better off with something like the Nighthawk X4S? I may be able to move the arlo base station to next to the modem, and then plug consoles directly into a router but that is TBD as I kind of want to make a gaming "room".

    Thanks in advance for all of your help!
     
  2. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    13,697
    Arlo used to use its own wireless network. Has that changed?
    If your home one floor or two?

    I think a single two-stream router (Google WiFi), with a single Ethernet LAN port isn't going to do it for you. You'll end up adding a switch if you want to connect your gaming consoles via Ethernet, which is what I'd recommend.

    If end up adding a second GWiFi to extend range, the shared two-stream backhaul is going to limit the bandwidth you'll get from it. Then you'll also have to deal with devices that don't want to connect where you want them.

    I think a single router might be a better way to go for you. I'd recommend NETGEAR R7800
     
  3. rymc

    rymc New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Arlo has a base station which needs connection, and then the cameras themselves connect through the base station. The base station I have wired as I'm not sure it can do wireless, nor do I have the belief that my current system would be able to support it properly as we already have some issues connecting (I'll probably be changing this system out in the future, anyway).

    I have two floors, however our primary living space is on one floor and we don't connect really in the basement or on the 2nd floor (guest bedrooms only). I can get wi-fi up there now, so have no problem believing that an upgraded system would enable any guests to connect as needed.

    I'll look into the R7800 further. I'm sure I'll have more questions. Thanks for your response!
     
  4. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    13,697
    I was just trying to clarify that this problem on your bullet list isn't due to router wifi range.
    Arlo connected cameras are outside of the house (4,000 sq. ft lot) and the reception is poor
     
  5. System Error Message

    System Error Message Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2014
    Messages:
    4,063
    If you are going wireless, its usually a bad idea. Only in some rare situations do wireless actually see better speeds than wired.

    Cable what you can, if you have devices outside the house and dont want to drill holes for ethernet cables you can use powerline if you have plugs or you can wire the wires to the plug of powerline for those devices that cant get wifi. You can also have multiple wifi APs to cover the entire area for good wifi reception.

    Wire what devices you can, this'll give space to wifi as wifi is shared space, just like cable.
     
    wesbez, rymc and CaptainSTX like this.
  6. rymc

    rymc New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    I've seen these things, but don't quite get it -- is it literally just adding a LAN connection through a normal plug? do I need to have anything else to go along with it?
     
  7. System Error Message

    System Error Message Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2014
    Messages:
    4,063
    avoid passing fuse boxes and phases if possible, get the highest rated AV you can because more likely you'll get 10% of rated speeds. so AV2000 will give you 200mb/s practical. Place the plugs further from switching based PSUs or before them.
     
  8. rymc

    rymc New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks -- this is actually the one I added to my cart already after starting to read about them.

    Last question (haha, yeah right):
    cables -- Cat 6, Cat 6a, Cat 7? I won't be running any extreme lengths in this house and will be using more for jumpers or for connecting the powerline (I read that it's best to use an outlet away from electrical interference...but that'll be max 10 feet for me).
     
  9. System Error Message

    System Error Message Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2014
    Messages:
    4,063
    yup, keep them away from electrical interference. If you have a multi phase electrical system, try to separate the interference to another phase and powerline on the same phase.

    cat6 can run 10Gb/s up to 50m i believe, cat6a even more. Cat 7 doesnt exist. I suggest using both cat6a and cat6 depending where, same with copper and CCA, both are valid as long as they hold the standard with copper being better for permanent placements and CCA for the last end and for cables that you move around often, also would do for short distances like a few meters. This is for 10Gb/s networking. for 1Gb/s cat6 is sufficient
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019