Having bad luck with routers

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ct1615

Regular Contributor
My last two routers have crapped out on me

Asus ac66u b1 kept overheating after a year and would freeze

I replaced it with a netgear r6700 v3 and it worked great for 18 months+ and all sudden it is dropping the 2.4ghz signal after more then 24hours without a reboot.
https://www.snbforums.com/threads/throughput-on-2-4ghz-channel-keeps-dropping.59723/

Any thoughts on the Asus ax56u? Or even asus rtf-1700? I need a router that lies flat and can fit under a tv stand due to two kids who would love to play space ship with a router out in the open. Reliability and stability take precedence over earth shattering performance.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
can fit under a tv stand
Is the router getting enough ventilation under there? Could be the reason for early failure. There should be nothing stacked on top of it and there should be a solid surface under it, since vents are often on the bottom of the router.
 

ct1615

Regular Contributor
The router sits on a hard wood floor with about five inches of free space from the floor to the first level of the TV stand. Plenty of free space on each side and a large air intake duct sits behind the TV stand and keeps air moving. It's far from perfect but not the worst situation. I could jerry rig a 5v fan into the unit but that's a last resort.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
I could jerry rig a 5v fan into the unit but that's a last resort.
No, your setup is fine for cooling. Not the best for Wi-Fi, but you probably know that.

One thing that does help routers and electronic equipment in general is putting it on a UPS. It's essential if you get a lot of thunderstorms and/or electrical surges, spikes, dropouts.
 

Trip

Very Senior Member
Besides another all-in-one, would you consider a discrete router plus a separate PoE access point? For the minor penalty of just one more AC adapter, that combo is usually more reliable than most consumer all-in-ones would be over the long haul. They work together to split the processing/heat load, plus if either device fails or needs upgrading, you're don't have to rip and replace your entire network stack, only just that piece. You just need enough skill to get the gear setup properly and it should be set-and-forget. Not hugely difficult if you're patient and willing to learn, nor all that expensive if you do it in stages.

Since the routing and switching on your R6700 still works (I presume) how about just disabling wifi on it and buying a TP-Link EAP245 (<$90) or EAP225v3 (<$60). Either one includes a gigabit PoE injector, whose LAN port you'd wire to one of the R6700's LAN ports, and whose LAN+POWER port you'd wire to the EAP. With PoE (power over ethernet), you'd be free to locate the AP in a much more optimal broadcast location, even more out of reach of the kids (ideally the ceiling or high up on a shelf). To run the first leg of cable, you could use flat Cat6 for going under carpet or wall molding, and/or surface-mount raceway (example) to further protect the cable from the kids and/or make the cable run less unsightly.

Then if you ever desire to upgrade the router, you can rip and replace the R6700 separately with a much more solid wired router (Ubiquiti EdgeRouter, pfSense box, etc.), while keeping your wireless untouched (because it's a separate device).

Just a thought while you're mulling this over.
 
Last edited:

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
Sounds like a good idea to me Trip. It is cheaper to buy a wireless AP over a full router and if you mount the wireless AP up high you will have better Wi-Fi coverage. Sounds like a win-win solution.
 

ct1615

Regular Contributor
Besides another all-in-one, would you consider a discrete router plus a separate PoE access point? For the minor penalty of just one more AC adapter, that combo is usually more reliable than most consumer all-in-ones would be over the long haul. They work together to split the processing/heat load, plus if either device fails or needs upgrading, you're don't have to rip and replace your entire network stack, only just that piece. You just need enough skill to get the gear setup properly and it should be set-and-forget. Not hugely difficult if you're patient and willing to learn, nor all that expensive if you do it in stages.

Since the routing and switching on your R6700 still works (I presume) how about just disabling wifi on it and buying a TP-Link EAP245 (<$90) or EAP225v3 (<$60). Either one includes a gigabit PoE injector, whose LAN port you'd wire to one of the R6700's LAN ports, and whose LAN+POWER port you'd wire to the EAP. With PoE (power over ethernet), you'd be free to locate the AP in a much more optimal broadcast location, even more out of reach of the kids (ideally the ceiling or high up on a shelf). To run the first leg of cable, you could use flat Cat6 for going under carpet or wall molding, and/or surface-mount raceway (example) to further protect the cable from the kids and/or make the cable run less unsightly.

Then if you ever desire to upgrade the router, you can rip and replace the R6700 separately with a much more solid wired router (Ubiquiti EdgeRouter, pfSense box, etc.), while keeping your wireless untouched (because it's a separate device).

Just a thought while you're mulling this over.
Wife already hates the spaghetti junction behind the TV stand, I would be hesitant to add more wires behind the TV stand or under the carpet. Looking to keep the price around $100, willing to go a little more if its something like Wifi 6 and works well with AC/N clients.
 

Trip

Very Senior Member
Wife already hates the spaghetti junction behind the TV stand, I would be hesitant to add more wires behind the TV stand or under the carpet. Looking to keep the price around $100, willing to go a little more if its something like Wifi 6 and works well with AC/N clients.
Gotcha.

Re- AX, the only real-life benefit right now is up to 2x more throughput in 2.4Ghz for AX clients; otherwise all other unique benefits are basically vaporware, probably for at least another year or more. Add to that forthcoming 6Ghz will require new hardware in another year or two's time anyways. If you still really wanted AX, I'm unsure as to the stability of the cheaper models. I do know that SNB really likes the Asus RT-AX88U running Merlin, but at nearly $300, way out of your budget here.

You might as well save your money and buy a more mature and stable AC Wave 2 product. I'd go Qualcomm for the better wireless experience on average, something like a TP-Link Archer A7 for $65. It's also fully compatible with OpenWRT should you want to max out stability and/or fully customize things.
 

ct1615

Regular Contributor
Gotcha.

Re- AX, the only real-life benefit right now is up to 2x more throughput in 2.4Ghz for AX clients; otherwise all other unique benefits are basically vaporware, probably for at least another year or more. Add to that forthcoming 6Ghz will require new hardware in another year or two's time anyways. If you still really wanted AX, I'm unsure as to the stability of the cheaper models. I do know that SNB really likes the Asus RT-AX88U running Merlin, but at nearly $300, way out of your budget here.

You might as well save your money and buy a more mature and stable AC Wave 2 product. I'd go Qualcomm for the better wireless experience on average, something like a TP-Link Archer A7 for $65. It's also fully compatible with OpenWRT should you want to max out stability and/or fully customize things.
Thanks, do you think the A9 would be worth the extra $20 for beam-forming and MU-MIMO?
 

Trip

Very Senior Member
Yes, potentially worth it for both of those, although not officially compatible with OpenWRT as the A7 is, but if you're just wanting to K.I.S.S., not a big deal.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
Thanks, do you think the A9 would be worth the extra $20 for beam-forming and MU-MIMO?
No. MU-MIMO is useful only if you have two or more devices that support it (good luck finding that out) and have strong signal levels. Beamforming is a real technology. But it was standardized in 802.11ac and implementations vary. It's mostly a marketing buzzword thrown in to bulk up the "benefits" list.
 

cplay

Regular Contributor
No. MU-MIMO is useful only if you have two or more devices that support it (good luck finding that out) and have strong signal levels. Beamforming is a real technology. But it was standardized in 802.11ac and implementations vary. It's mostly a marketing buzzword thrown in to bulk up the "benefits" list.
Explicit beamforming is worth it IMO, mimo not.

Beamforming has been very handy in mid range link rates!
 

cplay

Regular Contributor
I'd be interested in knowing why you say that. Do you have any data to back up that opinion?
Link rates when in my garden so through 60 cm thick french stone walls have better links rates!

Scientific, I know.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
Link rates when in my garden so through 60 cm thick french stone walls have better links rates!

Scientific, I know.
That's ok. Doesn't have to be rocket science. So you get better link rates when explicit beamforming enabled than when it is disabled?
 

ct1615

Regular Contributor
Update;

So I was all set to purchase the tp-link router and ordered it from Amazon last night(will take almost a week even with prime). I check my 2.4ghz speed on our laptop and I'm getting 70% of my 5ghz throughput 6 feet away from the router and through a wall. Last time I re-booted the router was Saturday night so I guess the threat of competition has it running normal again :). I'll see how long this lasts...
 

ct1615

Regular Contributor
Second Update;

The 2.4ghz signal throughput again dropped to a fraction of the 5ghz throughput. I swapped out the netgear nighthawk for the TP-link, a much smaller router, and set up was fairly easy. They don't tell you the default login name and password in any of the paperwork or mobile app (I had to guess the usual name & login). The user software is basic but easy to use and the router performs as well as the Asus & Netgear routers I've had.
 

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