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How do range extenders work ?

Discussion in 'General Wireless Discussion' started by Denna, Jan 18, 2017.

  1. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    I have a mobile hotspot that needs to connect to a router through an extender.

    Hotspot <Wi-fi> Range Extender <Ethernet> Router

    The hotspot, extender and router are placed next to each other.

    Since the distance between the hotspot and extender is less than 3 feet, 5 GHz should be the better frequency for performance.

    According to the manufacturer, the hotspot supports AC1750 and MU-MIMO. Does that mean 433 MHz is for the 2.4 GHz frequency and 1300 MHz is for the 5 GHz frequency ?

    When a range extender connects to the hotspot, does it use one 5 GHz stream or multiple streams ?

    When deciding on which one to buy, would an extender that supports greater than 1300 MHz for the 5 GHz frequency be a waste ?
     
  2. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    You would be better off getting a router that supports a wireless WAN connection. But assuming you can't do that..

    5 GHz will provide higher speed, yes. But the throughput you get will depend on the extender's wireless class.

    What hotspot are you using? I know of none that support AC1750, which is a 3x3 design.

    AC1750 routers support up to 450 Mbps in 2.4 GHz and 1300 Mbps in 5 GHz. But that is only with a device that also supports those rates.
     
    gowg likes this.
  3. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    thiggins,

    The hotspot is an LG V521WG and according to LG customer service it supports AC1750.

    When a range extender connects to the hotspot, does it use one 5 GHz stream or multiple streams ?

    When deciding on which one to buy, would an extender that supports greater than 1300 MHz for the 5 GHz frequency be a waste ?​
     
  4. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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  5. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    thiggins,

    The LG V521WG is a tablet that acts as a mobile hotspot.
     
  6. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    Ok. I cannot find any reference to Wi-Fi spec other than 802.11a/b/g/n/ac. I can find no reference to supporting AC1750. This would require a 3x3 radio, which would be highly unlikely in a tablet or mobile device.
     
  7. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    thiggins,

    The AC1750 reference came from LG customer support.

    After some research, I read the tablet uses a Qualcomm Snapdragon 615 chip. In the product brief for this chip, connectivity is supported by VIVE 1-stream 802.11n/ac. VIVE 1-stream 802.11n/ac supports up to 433 Mbps on a single stream.

    That LG customer support got this wrong doesn't surprise me.​
     
  8. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    1x1 AC sounds much more likely. So an AC750 class extender would be a proper match. Anything higher will be a waste of money unless you can get a good deal on an AC1200 extender.
     
  9. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    Can you explain how extender speeds are specified ?

    If an extender shows a 1300 Mbps speed for the 5 GHz frequency, does that mean it has (3) 5 GHz streams each running at 433 Mbps ? Or is it (1) stream running at 1300 Mbps ?

    If an extender will act as an Ethernet to Wi-Fi media bridge between (1) hotspot and (1) router, is more than one stream used ?

    I've seen the Netgear EX6150 priced at less than $50.

    It has a dual core CPU, more 5 GHz speed than is necessary, but it's two years old.

    Can the Netgear EX6150 be used as a media bridge ?

    For a home network that will be routing (2) HD Netflix connections, (1) HD Youtube connection, online console gaming and web surfing, is the Netgear EX6150 up to the task ?
     
  10. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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  11. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    thiggins,

    So one 5 GHz stream is equal to 433 Mbps ?​
     
  12. pege63

    pege63 Very Senior Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  13. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    How do you find out the channel width of an Android tablet's Wi-Fi capabilities ?
     
  14. pege63

    pege63 Very Senior Member

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    Go to wifi setting, dubell tab om your network SSID and info comes up about its status, signal strength, speed, freq, security, ip.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2017
  15. Denna

    Denna Senior Member

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    pege63,

    Thanks for the help.​
     
    pege63 likes this.