Is Ubiquiti Unifi an upgrade from Asus Aimesh?

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ces1965

Occasional Visitor
I've been using multiple Asus routers with AIMesh. I like it when it works, but lately problems develop where I have to reset the main router and set up everything again. The latest problem was constant disconnects from my Verizon ONT so no internet connection. Rebooting brings back the connection but then it disconnects again. I don't think it's a problem with the ONT. Is the Ubiquiti Dream Machine and APs better? I just want more reliability and fewer problems that require a hard reset and then reconnecting all the Aimesh nodes again.
 
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MichaelCG

Very Senior Member
It might be....it might not be. It really depends on what your requirements are. Overall speeds, if using mesh, will most likely be slower for a single client when trying to check max speed. But most likely reliability will go up. There are many options out there to solve for your issues. Ubiquiti just happens to be one of them.
 

Trip

Very Senior Member
As @MichaelCG said, it really all depends on your specific requirements.

Looking at things purely from a topology perspective, if your nodes all backhaul wirelessly, then chances are the right tri-band consumer mesh system would likely do a better job for you than any dual-band business-grade stack, UniFi or otherwise. For top reliability, Eero is what you want. If 75-150Mb/s per endpoint connected to remote nodes suffices (as it does for 90+% of consumers), then regular dual-band Eero will work fine. For max speed, you'll want tri-band Eero Pro.

If, on the other hand, you have the ability to hard-wire all or most nodes, then SMB-grade discrete components with wire-first dual-band APs would potentially be a much better choice, especially if more advanced control was important to you. That said, the Dream Machine platform is still a bit flaky, even at 1.9.2 -- beyond just throwing caution to the wind and pulling the trigger, I'd recommend reading UI's forums for some insight into exactly how stable, or unstable, the UDM is. Since reliability is key for you, I personally would avoid the UDM, and if you want to stick with UniFi, build a modular stack around the USG or USG Pro (or forthcoming UXG Pro). Or, look at other stacks altogether, of which I'm happy to get into if you're interested.
 

ces1965

Occasional Visitor
Thanks. I switched to Asuswrt-Merlin and that seemed to fix the problems. Now I’m back to the Internet constantly failing and have to reboot 2-5x a day. Wifi is up but no Internet. Just getting tired of this equipment. I have a fully wired back haul. My wife has already approved junking our current Asus collection. I just want something more reliable
 

Trip

Very Senior Member
I presume the ISP gateway/modem isn't equally or more so to blame for internet cutting out? If it is indeed the Asus gear, then it may be time to move on.

If budget is less of a concern and you want arguably the most reliability with the fewest moving parts, go with Cisco small office gear (three pieces of hardware, that's it). For <800Mb of internet, an RV260P and two CBW240AC access points. For gigabit internet, an RV345P instead of the R260P. Unlike UniFi or TP-Link Omada, the wireless controller is embedded (into the AP firmware), so no separate controller instance to setup or rely on, and the PoE switch and gateway are converged into a single box. Cost, though, would be $560-770.

If the Cisco approach is too spendy, then UniFi is an option, but honestly for a discrete controller system, TP-Link Omada gives you equivalent link-layer performance for lower cost (minus the hardware diversity). I would do a TL-R605 router, TL-SG2008P switch, two EAP245's and the OC200 controller, or host the controller for free as a software install on an always-on PC, RPi or server/VM). Total cost will be $350-430, depending on if you buy the OC200 or host the controller yourself.

Either way, you'll have cleaner, higher-capacity wifi and a network that runs more like an appliance and less like a toy.
 
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RMinNJ

Regular Contributor
Sounds like a problem with your modem or internet signal if you have wifi but no internet?
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
Sounds like a problem with your modem or internet signal if you have wifi but no internet?

No. Some Asus router users have this disconnection issue, perhaps with specific ISP provided equipment. There are threads about it here on SNB, Asus made an attempt to fix it with DHCP query frequency, etc.
 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
I presume the ISP gateway/modem isn't equally or more so to blame for internet cutting out? If it is indeed the Asus gear, then it may be time to move on.

If budget is less of a concern and you want arguably the most reliability with the fewest moving parts, go with Cisco small office gear (three pieces of hardware, that's it). For <800Mb of internet, an RV260P and two CBW240AC access points. For gigabit internet, an RV345P instead of the R260P. Unlike UniFi or TP-Link Omada, the wireless controller is embedded (into the AP firmware), so no separate controller instance to setup or rely on, and the PoE switch and gateway are converged into a single box. Cost, though, would be $560-770.

If the Cisco approach is too spendy, then UniFi is an option, but honestly for a discrete controller system, TP-Link Omada gives you equivalent link-layer performance for lower cost (minus the hardware diversity). I would do a TL-R605 router, TL-SG2008P switch, two EAP245's and the OC200 controller, or host the controller for free as a software install on an always-on PC, RPi or server/VM). Total cost will be $350-430, depending on if you buy the OC200 or host the controller yourself.

Either way, you'll have cleaner, higher-capacity wifi and a network that runs more like an appliance and less like a toy.

I ran a TP-Link business class router once. Their code was crap and they stopped supporting the router before they fixed the software. I picked it because it was rack mount without knowing that everybody's firmware was good. I then realized some companies write much better software than other companies. There are threads on this site with setting up and using my TP-Link router. It was years ago. I will never run TP-Link anything ever again.
 

ces1965

Occasional Visitor
I presume the ISP gateway/modem isn't equally or more so to blame for internet cutting out? If it is indeed the Asus gear, then it may be time to move on.

If budget is less of a concern and you want arguably the most reliability with the fewest moving parts, go with Cisco small office gear (three pieces of hardware, that's it). For <800Mb of internet, an RV260P and two CBW240AC access points. For gigabit internet, an RV345P instead of the R260P. Unlike UniFi or TP-Link Omada, the wireless controller is embedded (into the AP firmware), so no separate controller instance to setup or rely on, and the PoE switch and gateway are converged into a single box. Cost, though, would be $560-770.

If the Cisco approach is too spendy, then UniFi is an option, but honestly for a discrete controller system, TP-Link Omada gives you equivalent link-layer performance for lower cost (minus the hardware diversity). I would do a TL-R605 router, TL-SG2008P switch, two EAP245's and the OC200 controller, or host the controller for free as a software install on an always-on PC, RPi or server/VM). Total cost will be $350-430, depending on if you buy the OC200 or host the controller yourself.

Either way, you'll have cleaner, higher-capacity wifi and a network that runs more like an appliance and less like a toy.
Thanks, the Cisco is not too spendy. But does it have good central management and not too hard to set up? Unifi seems to offer pretty easy management. The TP link stuff looks good too and they seem to have some kind of central management tool. I assume both have features like DDNS, guest network, etc. I read a review on Amazon that said you had to manage the wifi points over a wireless connection rather than wired, which suggests that each must be set up separately. that's ok, as long as once set up I can manage everything from one browser address (ideally).

One other question i had is, is there any benefit to replacing all of my dumb switches? Unifi seemed to offer affordable managed switches to integrate with their system. I have probably 5-7 switches all over the house.

Also, are there licensing fees on the Cisco. I could talk my wife into those, but it's something to be aware of and would rather not have to pay $160 a year to use my system
 
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coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
I pay no Licensing fee for my Cisco small business networking equipment. They have free firmware updates for the life of the product. Now as for Cisco enterprise equipment there are fees. And you will not want to run Cisco enterprise equipment for home as it will be really loud as it is built for data closets.
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
I pay no Licensing fee for my Cisco small business networking equipment.

You're not paying, because you're not using some of the features. Why saving the details?

 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
I did not want to use the traffic mapping software on the RV340 router as it only sees one level. I route all my traffic from my Cisco L3 switch and the RV340 mapping software can't deal with it. I don't remember what it is called as it was years ago. Cisco has much better software you can load on a server to map out Cisco devices. It is free for home use up to a number of devices. A business needs to pay. I had the old version loaded on a server but I turned off my server rack so I am not running the new version.

If you want to spend money then go ahead but not me.

As far replacing the hardware I would just buy another Cisco RV340 router if it broke. I have been running my RV340 for years with no problems.

You are picking at the wrong person as I do what I say. I am not hear to sell hardware like you. Quit nitpicking looking for flaws.
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
I am not hear to sell hardware like you.

I use Netgate, Ruckus, Cisco and recently I play with Asus routers. What hardware you're referring to? My point is if you're helping someone, be precise and don't save some details. Cisco RV340 needs license to unlock all the features - it's a fact, not nitpicking. You can't use some of the features, if you don't pay.
 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
It is nitpicking as you don't need all the features. The router works. It is like saying you need a controller for Ruckus APs because you can. Well maybe this is a bad example as you do need a controller for multicast. But any way you can run without a controller.

You will be better off saving CPU cycles for the internet rather than running sundries.

Buy a L3 switch. It will help you more.
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
You were asked the following question, @coxhaus:

Also, are there licensing fees on the Cisco.

The answer is - yes, if you need all the features. It's up to @ces1965 to decide what features he needs, once correct information is provided. I don't understand why I should hide something from a person who needs help and is asking a simple question! I also don't pay licensing fees on my Cisco routers, but it doesn't mean they don't exist. An Asus home router for $100 does for free similar things to what Cisco is charging for. I'm sorry, it's true.

Enough. I'll let you know when I need help with L3 switches. Thank you!
 

ces1965

Occasional Visitor
I think I’m leaning towards the Omada. I like the lower price compared to Unifi. I like the inexpensive managed switches, as Unifi has but Cisco does not seem to. Not a big fan of licensing either with the Cisco setup.
 

miniterror

Regular Contributor
I recently (like 3 months ago) converged from a Unifi dream machine and NanoHD AP back to Asus and i couldnt be more happier.
With the UDM Base i was tinkering like every x days because something didnt work as expected.
Now on Asus everything works as expected again.
So for my personal usecase it didnt work better.
Have a look on the Unifi forums to see if the firmware has became more stable.
When i still had it there were quite some bugs and the forum mod always suggested to test new BETA firmware wich introduced different bugs.
 

ces1965

Occasional Visitor
I recently (like 3 months ago) converged from a Unifi dream machine and NanoHD AP back to Asus and i couldnt be more happier.
With the UDM Base i was tinkering like every x days because something didnt work as expected.
Now on Asus everything works as expected again.
So for my personal usecase it didnt work better.
Have a look on the Unifi forums to see if the firmware has became more stable.
When i still had it there were quite some bugs and the forum mod always suggested to test new BETA firmware wich introduced different bugs.
I wish my Asus system still worked. Just had another internet disconnect this morning. All the kids and wife scrambling to use a mobile connection for work and school. Reboot, then wait for the next internet disconnect. Which will no doubt be sometime today. And oddly, the Asus configuration page says the internet is connected. just none of the devices get any internet. Basically, all the Asus stuff is going up on ebay soon
 

miniterror

Regular Contributor
I wish my Asus system still worked. Just had another internet disconnect this morning. All the kids and wife scrambling to use a mobile connection for work and school. Reboot, then wait for the next internet disconnect. Which will no doubt be sometime today. And oddly, the Asus configuration page says the internet is connected. just none of the devices get any internet. Basically, all the Asus stuff is going up on ebay soon
If the asus states it still has internet im starting to think its a different problem thats causing your outages.
Could it be a DNS server problem?
You can test this easy to set 2 different DNS servers in the WAN page, i personally use 1.1.1.2 and 9.9.9.9
 

ces1965

Occasional Visitor
If the asus states it still has internet im starting to think its a different problem thats causing your outages.
Could it be a DNS server problem?
You can test this easy to set 2 different DNS servers in the WAN page, i personally use 1.1.1.2 and 9.9.9.9
Thanks, I'm going to try this. Just for the record, when I started having problems with my Asus setup a few months ago, the Asus configuration page did show a disconnect from the internet (Verizon Fios ONT). But switching to Asus-WRT seemed to solve that problem. Then I started having the problem where every device on the network (wired and wireless) would lose an internet connection, such that the iphones would prompt the user to switch to cellular. That's the problem that's been plaguing me for the last week or so, every day. The problem is resolved by a reboot of the main Asus router (all my others are AiMesh nodes).

UPDATE - this didn't work. I set the DNS servers as indicated, but the internet connectivity lasted about 45 minutes and then everything disconnects again.

Any chance it's my ONT?
 
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