Moca adapters, multiple set up how?

pcumming

New Around Here
If I were to add a MoCA adapter to my router and to the coax I realize I would use another bonded MoCA adapter somewhere else in the house.
1. I also assume I could connect a device via Ethernet directly to that MoCA adapter. Correct?

2. Now what if I wanted to add another MoCA adapter or two more in other rooms? How would the router know how to divvy up the IP addresses? Or would I need some sort of switch where are all the coax cables connect outside the house? Thank you very much for helping this newbie. Peter
 

5stringdeath

Regular Contributor
The MOCA adapter hooked to your router just passes the traffic. Your router will hand out DHCP just fine.

The only odd thing you'll see is in traffic stats multiple clients looking like they are on the same Ethernet port on the router, cause technically they are.

I have three in my house. One at the router, two in other rooms. In the living room I have a small switch after the MOCA to wire up all my consoles and crap. They all work well and fully take advantage of my Gig FiOS. Lightens the wireless load too.

They are a great solution. I don't think many people use them due to obscurity or cost, as they are more expensive than Powerlines and other more advertised solutions. I love mine.
 

pcumming

New Around Here
Thank you. So to reiterate if I had 5 Moca adapters attached to each coax outlet in the house I would not need a switch or anything else because even though the 1st Moca is attached to my main router , the router would hand out multiple IP's to EACH Moca through the one ethernet connection to the main router?

Thank you again
Peter
 

5stringdeath

Regular Contributor
That's correct. I'm not even sure the MOCA adapters get an IP .. I don't see any in my router list. I think they just act as "switches" directing traffic. Someone smarter than me can probably be more technical :) . So your router is handing out IP's to your actual devices like normal.

Just keep in mind that most MOCA adapters only have a single ethernet port, so if you do have more than one device in a given room you want to connect you would need to buy a little 5 port switch or similar.
 
Last edited:

degrub

Very Senior Member
moca adapters are MODEMs. They convert an ethernet based signal on twisted pairs into a signal on a coax cable and vice versa. Most have a pass through port for analog cable tv / antenna signal.
Most cable simple installations are a "star" in physical arrangement all meeting at a common splitter that takes as input the cable company's signal from outside the house.
With two way communication required for digital cable and for MOCA, the splitter has to pass signals in both directions. If you are starting from a digital cable installation, the only question is the specific frequency range of the cable co.'s splitter. Unless it is MOCA 2 rated, it likely will not allow the MOCA 2 modem signals to pass through.

So you may have to replace the splitter with a MOCA 2 rated splitter.Also any other splitters in the cabling will have to be replaced.
You also will need a MOCA signa;l block filter inserted between the cable co outside source and the splitter in port to prevent your moca signal from going outside the house.

There are plenty of threads in this forum recommending specific splitters and how to install. Read please. There are also support guides at some of the digital cable co support pages for how to coexist with their existing network. it may be partially moca based. If you are not using digital cable tv or cable internet service the conversion will be simple.
 

5stringdeath

Regular Contributor
You also will need a MOCA signa;l block filter inserted between the cable co outside source and the splitter in port to prevent your moca signal from going outside the house.
In my case the coax is only internal. I have FIOS externally. Everything happens on my LAN
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
is anything connected to the coax ?
sketch up a map of the coax layout with all devices, model #s, that are connected shown.
you and we will need that to identify issues and help you.
 

pcumming

New Around Here
Thank you all very much. I understand about the POE filter and appropriate splitters as well as F Caps. I do not have any DTV coming in, just internet via Spectrum on the coax to Spectrums Arris cable modem to crappy Sagemcom router to be replaced eventually. I do have a point to point (ethernet) AP to a Nighthawk 8000p Router.


****So all in all is it safe to say if my wiring is fine in house (no extra splitters) and I have 4 Moca adapters-that I do not need anything else in the 3 rooms where I have the Moca to Ethernet adapters (connecting just one ethernet device per room) and there should be no IP conflicts since that one ethernet connection to the router/cable modem should handle it all?????????????
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
yes.
The moca modems do not have anything to do with IP assignment.
They are similar to an unmanaged switch.
In fact, you could put a 5 port ungmangaged switch directly connected to the ethernet port of the moca modem and have 5 very happy devices. :)
 

Robert Tomas

New Around Here
If I were to add a MoCA adapter to my router and to the coax I realize I would use another bonded MoCA adapter somewhere else in the house.
1. I also assume I could connect a device via Ethernet directly to that MoCA adapter. Correct?
2. Now what if I wanted to add another MoCA adapter or two more in other rooms? Peter
Here is a graphic on how you could do the multiple Moca adapter install. Took many trial & errors, diagram versions and many helping consults to get to this V11. Mine has been in for about 5 months and I love having this stable wired solution rather than using wireless.

As you can see you could add as many Moca adapters as you have cable runs; or as many ethernet drops as you have switch outputs to add to any of the moca adapters. As I have been told in the past, you use 1 Moca Adapter to insert the signal into the coax cabling system and additional moca adapters to convert the signal back to ethernet. Some modems or gateways will have the Moca capability built-in, negating the requirement for the first moca adapter. The basic requirement that I misunderstood early on in my efforts is that the Moca must be inserted IN FRONT of the modem. You also have to be using Moca capable splitters (correct frequencies and bi-directional) on your coax to pass the signal both ways. If your going to spend $$$ on Moca adapters another 10-12$ for quality splitters is worth it. I used BAMF, but there are others.

 

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