MoCA // Whole Home Partially Working

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icorn25

New Around Here
See attached wiring diagram for reference.

I have fiber coming into my home. The modem is placed at the fiber POE at the outside of the home (I guess that’s how they do it in SoCal). From the modem I have my first MoCA device splitting to the existing Coax cabling in the home. 1 of 3 of the receiving MoCA devices works properly. I only know that because it is connected to the router and we have blazing fast 200 Mbps wifi speeds (that is the speed that we pay for).

One of the other devices is connected to an Apple TV and that wired connection is only getting 80Mbps speed. And the third device is connected to a Samsung smart TV and it cannot even find an IP address.

All of the lights light up, indicating power and connection, but I can’t figure out what the issue is with the two lack-luster MoCA devices.

I hope y’all can help!
 

Attachments

  • MOCA Network wiring Diagram_ERE.pdf
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degrub

Very Senior Member
Isn’t the apple tv device equipped with a 100 Mbit/s port ?

what happens if you connect an ethernet cable to a laptop at each of the moca nodes that are having issues ?

then there is this issue with the two types of moca modems

So how is the router providing dhcp addresses to devices on the moca coax network ? I assume the router is connected to the moca modem via the router’s wan port ?

it might be easier if you place the router at the ont gateway and then connect the moca modem to a lan port on the router. Or is the ont providing dhcp services ?
 
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krkaufman

Very Senior Member
we have blazing fast 200 Mbps wifi speeds
Sidebar: FYI... It's good to be getting what you're paying for, but you may also want to use a couple PCs/laptops with built-in Gigabit Ethernet ports to perform LAN speed testing between the MoCA devices, to gauge whether the MoCA devices are netting what they should (that is, once the obvious hiccups are resolved and your Internet download becomes the test bottleneck).

Common utilities used for LAN speed testing include: iPerf, and LAN Speed Test from Totusoft.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
Beyond the likely culprit (the Broadcom 2.0/MaxLinear 2.5 conflict highlighted by @degrub), you may also consider a tweak to your setup:
  • Replace the Neoteck splitter with a model designed for MoCA, rather than a splitter marketed for satellite setups. ('gist: A splitter can't be optimized for both satellite service and retail MoCA hardware. See here.)
  • Consider rearranging the coax connections so that all MoCA nodes are hanging off the splitter outputs, with the splitter input capped with a MoCA filter and 75-ohm terminator. (e.g.)
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
it might be easier if you place the router at the ont gateway and then connect the moca modem to a lan port on the router. Or is the ont providing dhcp services ?
Yeah, I'm a bit puzzled by the various terms used in the OP and diagram...

"fiber POE"
"modem"
"Gateway"
"Router"

I'm assuming "modem" may be the ONT (Optical Network Terminal) at the "fiber POE" (point-of-entry), with the Gateway being the device acting as their primary home network router ... with a second router linked via MoCA, but configured strictly as a wireless access point.

But just assuming.
 

John_

New Around Here
Just my recommendations:
Put the router between the Gateway and the first 7250. If you need additional Ethernet ports where the router is currently, use a switch. (Unless you are just using the router as an access point or switch.) There should only be one device handling DHCP on a network.
Consider changing the 6 way splitter for a 3 way. The more ports on a splitter the more dB drop. -5.5dB on a 3 way, -11dB on a 6 way. dB uses a logarithmic scale not linear.
Make sure there aren't any other splitters along on the coax lines to other rooms. (Basement ceilings or attic.) If there are you need to change those to MOCA compatible splitters too.
 

icorn25

New Around Here
This is great advice everyone, thank you. I was able to check one issue off the list. @degrub you were right. The apple TV's ethernet port is 100Mbps. I connected my laptop and was getting full speed. I am still unable to connect the smart TV in the bedroom. It states that there is an IP and DHCP issue.

I will try moving the router next to the gateway, before the 7250. It is used as our access point, so I was trying to avoid moving it into the garage where our wifi may suffer. I would give it a try. I will also try replacing the coax splitter with your recommendations.

Thank you!
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
either 1) turn off the wifi in the router when you move it and install an AP to replace the central wifi or 2) set the router to AP mode and add another router at the gateway.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
I am still unable to connect the smart TV in the bedroom. It states that there is an IP and DHCP issue.
Similar to the Apple TV location, did you try your laptop connected to this MoCA adapter?

Separately, there remains confusion over the terms "gateway" and "router." What is the model # of your "gateway" device? Is this gateway functioning as your primary router (firewall, NAT, DHCP server, etc)? Or is this "gateway" device just the fiber terminal, supplying the Ethernet WAN connection? (If the latter, it may explain the DHCP assignment issue -- though I'd have thought the router or Apple TV would have a similar issue., assuming your provider only hands out a single WAN IP per location.)
 
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