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Most stable connection at range for local Xbox streaming?

Discussion in 'Wireless Buying Advice' started by brailyne59, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. brailyne59

    brailyne59 New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    2
    Hello everyone at SNB

    I'm looking to maximize performance of streaming from a local Xbox One X server on ethernet to a wireless (wi-fi AX 2x2, surface laptop 3) client.

    The data used for this is about 20mbps for 1080p/60fps.

    My network configuration:
    • Current router is a Linksys WRT3200ACM
    • ~20 clients, a few active at the same time
    • Not too much wifi channel interference from neighbors
    • Target primary client is at a range of 55 feet and beyond one inside sheetrock wall

    From looking at data on SNB:
    Based on the Router Ranker, the NETGEAR Nighthawk X4S (R7800) has the best average downlink speeds (and #1 at many other metrics)

    Based on the Router Charts, the ASUS AC2600 has the best 5ghz minimum downlink speeds, followed by the X4S. The best 2.4ghz minimum downlink speeds go to the Phicomm AC 1900.

    What I've tested so far:
    So far I've compared the WRT3200ACM performance to a Netgear RAX200. The RAX200 performs significantly better, however, the biggest problem with it is that it's not ready yet and very unstable.

    I'm wondering which metrics are best to compare for my target use case, and if these AC routers provide a more stable connection at range than any of the AX routers.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Trip

    Trip Very Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,148
    The R7800 may be your best bet for an all-in-one. Be aware, though; Netgear's factory firmware often leaves much to be desired in the stability department. Installing OpenWRT to get the desired long-term performance.

    Beyond an all-in-one, if your place is large enough, have you considered running distributed wifi via two or more hardwired APs, or a whole-house mesh system if you can't hardwire? Chances are either would help to get more usable signal closer to surface laptop, wherever it happens to be, delivering more bandwidth to the distant areas of your house than an all-in-one could.
     
  3. brailyne59

    brailyne59 New Around Here

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2020
    Messages:
    2
    Hello Trip,

    This R7800 sounds great, I would have never considered it if not for SNB. I'll have to get one and start testing with it then, thank you for the advice!

    My place is only ~1200sqft total across two floors, but I would be very interested in a mesh system (or a dedicated AP only) if it would improve performance for this case.

    Is there a high performance mesh system where the connection would be significantly stronger than the direct connection, if the 2nd meshed router would only be ~8 feet closer, but in line of sight of the client ?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Trip

    Trip Very Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,148
    Regarding multiple radio locations, yes, you will probably have higher wireless signal strength, especially at the edges of the home, but also the amount of throughput (Mb/s) should improve, as well -- presuming you've picked the right mesh product and/or can hardwire conventional APs via ethernet or MoCa.

    That part about the right product is important. If you bought a cheap wireless mesh product, let's say dual-band with flaky firmware, you actually might end up with worse client performance, in both speed and latency, versus a single, well-placed all-in-one. If, however, you put in a tri-band system with real-time backhaul optimization and traffic flow management, like Eero Pro, you may indeed be better off.

    At only ~1200 square feet, though, your place is likely too small to accommodate much more than a single radio cell -- maybe two radio locations if they're placed at the extreme ends/floors of the house (put too close together, they'd probably cause too much co-interference and actually make things worse).

    So I'd probably stick with a top-end all-in-one like the R7800. If it falls short on wifi range/throughput, return it within a week or two, and put in a mesh system perhaps.