Need a little help setting up my MOCA network

afterburn999

New Around Here
I recently bought a set of these Translite Global Moca 2.5 adapters. I tried setting it up in my room according to the tutorial video on their youtube page but I don't actually have a second wall jack leaving my room.


The way it's set up is Coax in from outside junction box > Coax Splitter In > Coax Splitter Out > Cable Modem > Ethernet to Router

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B08PMRCQV1/?tag=smallncom-20

I bought a couple of these splitters and I replaced my existing ones around my house.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07RB61LR9/?tag=smallncom-20

Is it possible for me to set up a connection?

Apologies if I created the thread wrong or confusing. I can take additional pictures of my set up.

Just trying to get one Moca connection set up from the Upstairs computer room to the basement.
 

afterburn999

New Around Here
Start off simple and get the MOCA setup working in a test setup. Test in the room where your router is. This is where one of the MOCA adapters is going to have to be.

TEST

1. Connect adapter 1 to a LAN port on your router.
2. Take a piece of coaxial cable and connect between adapter 1 and adapter 2.
3. Connect your upstairs PC to MOCA adapter 2 using an Ethernet cable.
4. Power up both MOCA adapters and confirm that the coaxial cable is working as a LAN cable. Indicator lights on adapters will give you a clue but try connecting to web sites and run a few speed tests. If everything checks out then you are ready to go into production mode and if you experience problems in the production mode you will need to trouble shoot you coaxial network but at least you know the adapters are working.

PRODUCTION (Before starting locate any splitters in your home and verify and/or replace them with splitters that will pass in excess 1 Ghz. Normal CATV splitters installed by a MSO may be limited to 900 Mhz.)

1. Upstairs connect both your cable modem and adapter 1. Use a splitter if necessary. Plug the LAN port on the adapter into a LAN port on your router. Plug your PC back into the router.

2. Now go to any coaxial cable outlet in your home and connect adapter 2 to it and then check for LAN connectivity by plugging a PC into its LAN port. Use a splitter if necessary to connect both adapter 2 and a TV.

3. For any coaxial terminations that aren't used install terminators to reduce signal leakage.

4. Inside your demarc point which is usually outside the house install a MOCA filter before the splitter feeding your upstairs and downstairs service points on the line side/incoming side of the splitter.

I tried the test section of this post and the MOCA connection works great between each other but when I take the second adapter to any other room in my house with an active Coax connection nothing happens. Could it be possible none of these connections are connected together at the cable junction box?
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
Could it be possible none of these connections are connected together at the cable junction box?
Exceedingly possible. If you only have Internet service, it's possible that the current modem connection is the only line connected.

A quick test, if/when you can afford to lose Internet connectivity, would be to try connecting your cable modem (just the modem) in the other locations, and see if it is able to sync w/ the provider.

Or, just head outside and check inside the box (and post a good wide-angle pic of what you find). You'd need to get inside there, anyway, to confirm a "PoE" MoCA filter is installed -- and to get one installed, if not.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
I bought a couple of these splitters and I replaced my existing ones around my house.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07RB61LR9/?tag=smallncom-20
It might be worthwhile drawing/posting a rough sketch of your coax plant, illustrating how the rooms and devices are connected, and where you have splitters (or other components). The above splitters aren't what is typically recommended for a MoCA setup (check the Holland GHS-PRO-M series, Verizon's MoCA 2.0 splitters), but I'm especially curious as to how a couple 6-way splitters would be needed.
 

afterburn999

New Around Here
Exceedingly possible. If you only have Internet service, it's possible that the current modem connection is the only line connected.

A quick test, if/when you can afford to lose Internet connectivity, would be to try connecting your cable modem (just the modem) in the other locations, and see if it is able to sync w/ the provider.

Or, just head outside and check inside the box (and post a good wide-angle pic of what you find). You'd need to get inside there, anyway, to confirm a "PoE" MoCA filter is installed -- and to get one installed, if not.

I'll test out the connection a bit later tonight when everyone goes to sleep see how it goes.

I've never opened our cable box before, is there a tool I need to open this?

I checked Amazon.ca and the only Holland splitters seem to only be available from the US. The only thing I am able to get here is a Holland PoE MoCA filter.
 

degrub

Part of the Furniture
just make sure the splitter znd anything else in the cable path has MOCA2 certified in its spec. You can find some that have built in amplifier if you have that with the existing splitter. MOCA usually does not need an amplified splitter as the modems have ample power.+

if you are using VOIP or may use in the future, you will want to investigate if the splitter needs a specific port to be rated to that spec.

You may need a separate MOCA2 POE filter for the inlet from the cable provider if the splitter does not have one built in.
 

afterburn999

New Around Here
So I checked the Coax outlets with the cable modem and they do seem to connect fine.

I made a diagram of how I am setting up my network, maybe I am doing something wrong?

House Network Map.png


This is what my cable box outside looks like, is there a special tool I need to get into this?
 

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degrub

Part of the Furniture
Maybe a screwdriver ?
I cannot see down into the circular area, but either a flat head or cross pattern will work.

it looks like one in one out, so i think you need to look downstream for a splitter.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
it looks like one in one out, so i think you need to look downstream for a splitter.
If the white line entering the box from below is the incoming line, there appear to be 2 black coax lines exiting the box from its bottom and looping around the right side of the box ... with one then exiting the pic at the top edge, but the other heading back behind the PVC pipe -- so there is likely a splitter inside this box. (I'm assuming the smaller black wire will be the ground wire.)

brightbox.JPG
 

afterburn999

New Around Here
Thanks I ordered the Terminal lock tool on Amazon, I'll update the post with more pictures when I get it.

The Black cable going up is the cable that goes directly in my modem and the one on the right goes directly into my main floor TV.

I also ordered a Holland Splitter and POE filter so we'll see what it looks like. I'm hoping there is not some cheap splitter somewhere in my house that leads to the basement covered in the walls.
 

degrub

Part of the Furniture
If you have two outs from that box, there is a splitter owned by the cable company inside.
Strictly speaking, you cannot touch it unless it is after the demarcation point which can be indicated by a label or similar inside or outside of the box.

If the second cable is only going to your TV and nowhere else in the house, then you should be able to use any other coax in the house by replacing the inside premises splitters.

you really want a layout map of the coax throughout the house, not just the wall plate connection locations.

Is the ISP modem DocCIS 3.0 or 3.1 ?
If 3.1 then you likely will have to shift the MOCA modems to Upper D bands as the lowest MOCA band usually conflicts with DocCIS 3.1 bands.
 
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afterburn999

New Around Here
Looks like everything is connected together so problem must be with a splitter around my house. I'll have to track it down somewhere.

I ordered a Holland Splitter and POE filter to replace the ones in this junction box. I don't think the existing ones will work for a MOCA network.
 

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degrub

Part of the Furniture
You would be correct. That splitter will not pass moca signals as they are higher frequency.
Note which cable is connected to the 3.5 dB loss port. You may need to match on the holland. Which device does the white cable go to ?

That 3 out splitter is functionally two two way splitters in series internally. That is how you get 3.5 loss on one port and 7 on the other two ports. If the holland matches or has all 3 as 3.5 dB loss, no issue for signal loss.
 

afterburn999

New Around Here
The White cable is the one going into the basement.

Is this the correct spot for the Moca filter? This is the cable coming from the demarc point on my lawn to the box.

1609919998918.png
 

degrub

Part of the Furniture
Yes. And sometimes you can get splitter/amps with the moca filter built in for the input port.

If that connection is sitting exposed to moisture - either in the box or outside you should look for a POE filter rated for outside service. Otherwise, find the weather seal caps you see there.

What is the white cable attached to inside the house ? is it the ISP modem ?

If you have an issue with signal strength to whatever is attached to the white cable you may have to use a moca 2 certified amp either a 0 dB loss type or one with a port with 3.5dB or less.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
Looks like everything is connected together so problem must be with a splitter around my house.
Or in how things are connected in that box ... but especially what appear to be the 2 MoCA filters, with one possibly blocking the MoCA link you're trying to establish. (Can't say for sure, not knowing what's connected to each output of the 3-way.)

I'd start by removing what appears to be a superfluous MoCA filter hanging off an output of the 3-way splitter, and see if you get different results.

See:
superfluous MoCA filter.png
(I'm guessing those are both MoCA filters, but you'd need to check the model #s to confirm.)
 
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krkaufman

Very Senior Member
I ordered a Holland Splitter and POE filter to replace the ones in this junction box. I don't think the existing ones will work for a MOCA network.
The pictured Antronix splitter can ~work~, in terms of allowing a MoCA connection, but the MoCA 2.5 network performance may suffer. (MoCA 1.1 required just 50 MHz, at 1125-1175 MHz, where attenuation isn't much different than for the cable signals; however, a MoCA 2.5 network requires 10x the bandwidth, 5 100 MHz channels, and so using splitters spec'd for the full MoCA Extended Band D, 1125-1675 MHz, and optimized for MoCA, is recommended for optimum performance.)


The White cable is the one going into the basement.
Odd choice by whoever hooked things up, given the equipment locations in your diagram. One would typically want the modem line connected to the low-loss output of this type of splitter (an unbalanced 3-way).

Making this change isn't required, but is recommended ... and should definitely be considered if/when replacing the Antronix w/ another splitter.


Is this the correct spot for the Moca filter? This is the cable coming from the demarc point on my lawn to the box.

View attachment 29160
That would be the optimum location, yes, but 6 inches further upstream is acceptable (where a MoCA filter appears to be installed).

If/when replacing the Antronix splitter, yes, get the "PoE" MoCA filter installed on the top-level splitter's input port.
 

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