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Need Advice on Supporting Two Networks In Small Office

Discussion in 'Other LAN and WAN' started by bbsam, Mar 26, 2020 at 3:55 PM.

  1. bbsam

    bbsam New Around Here

    Joined:
    Wednesday
    Messages:
    2
    Good afternoon.

    For our office, we have two networks. One we have had for many years via a DSL service provider because fiber is not available in our area. The other network is set up using a cable ISP for another department in our office. Our DSL option no longer serves our needs. I need to either split the cable network to support two private networks (if possible), or I'd have to get another modem/router to have two separate networks again.

    I'd prefer the first option. Can I add a second router to the cable network, and configure it so that I have a network A and, perhaps, sub network A2 so that devices on A cannot see devices on A2 and devices on A2 cannot see devices on A? If yes, can the router that serves A2 be connected to router A wirelessly or only wired?
     
  2. CaptainSTX

    CaptainSTX Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    May 2, 2012
    Messages:
    2,392
    You probably need to set up VLANs to accomplish what you want. Your requirement for separation is exactly what they are designed to do.

    Just having a second router behind the first (double NAT) will result in devices on A not being to see devices on A2 but devices on A2 being able to see devices on A.

    How easy it will be to set up VLANs depends on the hardware you use and the firmware it is using. Some router OS support setting up VLANs using the GUI such as Tomato. With certain other routers and firmware it may be possible to use a script to create VLANs.

    The simplest solution maybe to purchase a smart or managed switch where the VLANs can be setup.

    Before anybody can make more precise suggestions you need to provide more detailed information about the physical separation between the two networks, how many devices connect to each and how they connect (WiFi or Ethernet). Also will it be possible for you to run an Ethernet cable between A & A2.
     
  3. bbsam

    bbsam New Around Here

    Joined:
    Wednesday
    Messages:
    2
    5y
    Thank you for your reply. If A2 can view A but A cannot view A2, I could live with that. A2, in this scenario represents our legacy network. It is far more necessary to secure A2 than A. That being the case, is it as simple as a second router? Is DHCP enabled good enough for A to assign ipaddress range for A2, and A2 be isolated from access from A?

    The projected distance between A and A2 would be about 50-75 feet. I could run an ethernet cable from A (router-switch) to A2 (router-switch), but I'd rather be wireless, if possible. A would support 4 wired devices and two wireless. A2 would support 3 printers and 3 pcs.