Network Profile Name in Windows

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vrapp

Senior Member
On a Windows computer connected to the router by Ethernet, Windows chooses the name of the network ("network profile" in Windows terms), it appears, as the name of the first wireless network on the router. This name is probably somehow being reported by the router. This process is described in this article: https://www.howtogeek.com/364291/ho...he-active-network-profile-name-in-windows-10/ . I think it should be rather the name specified in router's UI under LAN/LAN IP/Host Name


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ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
So what is your point? :confused: This is a Windows 10 "feature". Complain to Microsoft about it.
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
On a Windows computer connected to the router by Ethernet, Windows chooses the name of the network ("network profile" in Windows terms), it appears, as the name of the first wireless network on the router. This name is probably somehow being reported by the router. This process is described in this article: https://www.howtogeek.com/364291/ho...he-active-network-profile-name-in-windows-10/ . I think it should be rather the name specified in router's UI under LAN/LAN IP/Host Name


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Yeah, that's a Windows 10 quirk... you can Google it. Wait awhile and it will change after some network reconnect action. You can find the name in the Registry and change it to whatever you want... but it will change again for no good reason, so not worth mucking around with in the Registry... I just live with it, courtesy one more stupid thing Windows 10 does.

OE
 

vrapp

Senior Member
Windows 10 wouldn't magically find out the name of the wireless network the router has created, being connected to the router by Ethernet. Apparently "1719" had been "told" by the router during some initial negotiation. I think it should have told HOMELAN instead.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Windows 10 wouldn't magically find out the name of the wireless network the router has created, being connected to the router by Ethernet. Apparently "1719" had been "told" by the router during some initial negotiation. I think it should have told HOMELAN instead.
Has this PC ever connected to the 1719 wireless SSID?
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Windows 10 wouldn't magically find out the name of the wireless network the router has created, being connected to the router by Ethernet. Apparently "1719" had been "told" by the router during some initial negotiation. I think it should have told HOMELAN instead.
Google it and learn... saves arguing needlessly about it. I certainly can't explain Windows network profile naming logic.

OE
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Yes, it has.
Then is will remember it from then.
...actually, no. It was in the past, but since then there was fresh installation of Windows on this computer.
In which case I expect Windows 10 is doing the same thing it did with Windows 7 Network Map, using the LLTP protocol to discover network information (like SSIDs) and applying it in Microsoft's typically broken way.

I just did a Wireshark capture on my Ethernet-only PC and could see that two devices on my network were "spilling the beans" on what SSIDs they were connected to.
 

vrapp

Senior Member
Thanks - very interesting implementation! I wonder if Microsoft has limited this spilling the beans to the local network, in this cloud-enabled age.
 

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