New router w/ actual QoS, 2.4+5GHz, wired

albegadeep

Occasional Visitor
I'm looking for a new router, since my RT-ACRH17 is both flakey and its QoS settings don't actually do anything. Here's some info about my network and needs:

Download speed up to 100 Mbps, upload up to 20 Mbps - continuous for days if needed, not "can handle in short bursts". Home network but with small server, used as internal file/backup server. 2.4 and 5 GHz networks (not all my stuff can do 5, and the extra range of 2.4 is helpful), in-network and guest for each. 2 wired connections (1 server, 1 desktop, each on fixed IPs). Wired uplink connection to modem. DHCP for all wireless connections.

I want the non-guest devices to be able to talk to each other (wired and wireless), while guest wifi connections shouldn't be able to see them. I want outgoing connections from the server (local fixed IP) going to remote port 443 (IP varies) to be lowest priority, but not simply bandwidth-throttled. Being able to restrict bandwidth on specific other devices (like iPads) would be nice, but is not required.

In other words, pretty basic requirements except for the ability to assign priorities to certain machines or types of traffic. (Priority-based, not bandwidth-throttling, so it can use the full bandwidth available after other devices' usage.)

Do you have any recommendations for a router that would fulfil these needs?
 

bbunge

Part of the Furniture
First recommendation is the Asus RT-AX86U with the RT-AX86S as second. Both have the same radios while the AX86U has more RAM and processor cores. Both support the custom Merlin firmware but the new Asus "388" code base firmware is great for most folks. The router can be managed from a very good Android or iOS app. While using the router as a NAS isnot usually recommended, it can be done and the router has at least one USB3 port.
I run on a 100/100 FIOS connection. Have had my AX86U for about 1 1/2 years. When I do heavy downloads the other family members do not complain even when streaming videos. So the Asus Adaptive QOS seems to be working for me.
There are other routers to choose from. You could go with an AC router but the AX is the current technology and should serve you for several years
 

albegadeep

Occasional Visitor
Thanks for the info; I'm looking at the RT-AX86U. Can anyone else confirm that QoS works properly on these? At 100/100, you might not notice, but my old connection (1.8 up) was nonfunctional except for the computer set as lowest priority, when it was generating heavy traffic.
 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
You might want to take a look at OpenWRT as it reads well for QoS. I would think any of the small business routers would have good QoS. Any of the Cisco 8xx and 9xx wireless routers would have great QoS low bandwidth processing but would meet your requirements. Cisco has so many versions, so it just depends on requirements.

Running a wired router and a wireless AP on top is not much different than running a wireless router. This would open up a lot more possibilities for good QoS. The consumer routers are going to be limited.
 

albegadeep

Occasional Visitor
Posting this as a followup:
I did get an ASUS RT-AX86U, and so far it's been a solid router. My main beef is that I didn't know before purchase that most of the "advanced" features (like AiProtection, Traffic analyzer, Apps analyzer, and Adaptive QoS) send data to Trend Micro, which requires me to agree to their privacy policy. (Declining turns off these features.) The router collects and sends to Trend Micro, among other things (it's a long list):
MAC addresses and device IDs
URLs, domains, and IP addresses of websites visited
Mobile/PC environment
Network architecture/topology and network telemetry data

Trend Micro expressly states they use some of this info for marketing, and share it with "affiliated companies, resellers, distributors, vendors, service providers or partners" (none of which are specified). As far as I can tell, there are no restrictions at all as to what they can do with users' information (personal info, browsing history, etc.) if they're outside the UK and EEA. Looks like selling it to a "partner" would be permitted.

No thanks; I'll pass on the "advanced" features in favor of privacy. I may look at Merlin and OpenWRT, to see if they can provide more features without selling my browsing history.
 

dave14305

Part of the Furniture
With Merlin you could easily use CAKE at your modest download/upload bandwidth. That wouldn’t require an Trend Micro EULA.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
The router collects and sends to Trend Micro, among other things (it's a long list):
MAC addresses and device IDs
URLs, domains, and IP addresses of websites visited
Mobile/PC environment
Network architecture/topology and network telemetry data
:
Trend Micro expressly states they use some of this info for marketing, and share it with "affiliated companies, resellers, distributors, vendors, service providers or partners" (none of which are specified).
This is incorrect and a common misunderstanding. What you are reading is Trend Micro's Global Privacy Notice. This is a catch-all notice that covers all of Trend Micro's products and services around the world. For example, how can it collect "Windows event log content" and "Screen capture of errors". It's no different than all those other generic licence agreements that everyone agrees to all the time.

The more relevant information is in this link. There you can see what data they may actually collect:

Source IP address
Destination IP address
URL
File name
File path
GUID (Globally Unique Identifier) is a hashed value of your router MAC address and components information. Your collected data can be mapped to the GUID, but that data cannot be mapped to you or your router.

This is the same sort of information that every cloud based antivirus product processes. That's not to say that you want to send Trend Micro this data. You're probably already sharing it with Microsoft or Google and don't want anybody else to have it.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Why is Web History tied to the TrendMicro engine and requires data collection agreement?
If you want a definitive answer you'll have to ask Trend Micro. Presumably it's because it's data that's processed by the same software engine that provides their other functions, e.g. Web Reputation Service. So maybe they don't actually collect any data for that function but they're just using a single licence agreement to cover everything rather than breaking it down into individual components.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
So maybe they don't actually collect any data

Maybe is equal to we don't know. It can be done locally with no TrendMicro involvement for sure.

Also - Device Recognition allows the product to identify devices connecting to the home network. Data collected - IP address.

Can you tell what device has IP address 192.168.144.12 on my network?

Anyway, personal choice to enable or disable. What's more important is this:

I didn't know before purchase

Here is the official page with RT-AX86U specifications. No word about data sharing with 3rd party company.

 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Maybe is equal to we don't know.
Indeed. There are lots of posts from conspiracy theorists and trolls. But as far as I know none of them have actually bothered to do any data analysis. They just point at a general licence agreement and claim the sky is falling.

It can be done locally with no TrendMicro involvement for sure.
Asus could have done that, but obviously it was easier for them to use the functionality of the Trend Micro engine as they were already licencing it for the other components.

Here is the official page with RT-AX86U specifications. No word about data sharing with 3rd party company.

Yeah and no word about data sharing in the advertising of just about every other piece of software currently produced. Welcome to the modern world.
 

dave14305

Part of the Furniture
But as far as I know none of them have actually bothered to do any data analysis.
Some wanker took a shot at it once.


Anyone worried should tcpdump any traffic on the WAN going to ntd-asus-2014b-en.fbs20.trendmicro.com and see that there's little chance they're slurping up all your browsing history if you're only using Adaptive QoS. The size of the data captured doesn't support that.

If you use Web Reputation Service (e.g. AiProtection features), then the behavior would be different, like you mention with any cloud/crowd-based security feature.
 

BreakingDad

Very Senior Member
index.jpeg


I'm safe.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
This conversation is similar to another:


Just sharing opinions for things we don't know for sure. Some feel free to categorize people with different opinion than their own in the process.

I'm safe.

I know. This is your Skynet bug reflecting blanket. ;)
 
Last edited:

bdub76

Regular Contributor
I’d recommend a Protectli device with openWRT or OPsense, so you can do actual QoS. And then use a switch with a dumb AP.
 

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