Now that the age of Gigabit Wifi/2.5GBe is here does merlin have plans on supporting JumboFrame 9000 and beyond?

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dhendodong

Occasional Visitor
Now that the age of Gigabit Wifi/2.5GBe is here does merlin have plans on supporting JumboFrame 9000 and beyond?
 

AndreiV

Very Senior Member
Does the ASUS stock firmware support this?

Merlin can only work around what ASUS provide.
 

dhendodong

Occasional Visitor
Does the ASUS stock firmware support this?

Merlin can only work around what ASUS provide.
AFAIK asus already has the 1500 mtu by default and, there are some few tutorials where you can make a script and put that on your startup script to have a customized mtu i just was just wondering if ever it will be implemented in a way where you can choose your desired mtu on the mtu drop down menu where currently 1500 is the only choice i hope one day there will be several choices of mtu there.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
There's always been the option to enable Jumbo frames, even in stock firmware. LAN > Switch Control.
 
Last edited:

dhendodong

Occasional Visitor
Using jumbo frames only adds load to the router when it has to fragmet outgoing packets. Or those packets will get fragmented more downstream.
By putting a larger payload into each frame, the CPUs have fewer frames to process. In return, this can reduce the amount of heat the network devices generate.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
i believe its only for 1500 mtu which is very outdated nowadays
Jumbo frames and MTU are different things. You can already use jumbo frames for LAN to LAN traffic if you want to.
 

dhendodong

Occasional Visitor
Jumbo frames and MTU are different things. You can already use jumbo frames for LAN to LAN traffic if you want to.
In computer networking, jumbo frames are Ethernet frames with more than 1500 bytes of payload, the limit set by the IEEE 802.3 standard.[1] Commonly, jumbo frames can carry up to 9000 bytes of payload, but smaller and larger variations exist and some care must be taken using the term. Many Gigabit Ethernet switches and Gigabit Ethernet network interface controllers and some Fast Ethernet switches and Fast Ethernet network interface cards can support jumbo frames.[2]

 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
In computer networking, jumbo frames are Ethernet frames with more than 1500 bytes of payload, the limit set by the IEEE 802.3 standard.[1] Commonly, jumbo frames can carry up to 9000 bytes of payload, but smaller and larger variations exist and some care must be taken using the term. Many Gigabit Ethernet switches and Gigabit Ethernet network interface controllers and some Fast Ethernet switches and Fast Ethernet network interface cards can support jumbo frames.[2]

Exactly my point.
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
Using jumbo frames only adds load to the router when it has to fragmet outgoing packets. Or those packets will get fragmented more downstream.
yes, and further, every device on a network has to be able to use the same size of frame or the fragmentation slows everything on the network (LAN) down, which makes the WAN connection seem slower.

BUT if OP is located somewhere that their ISP has brought them a direct (fibre?) connection with native IPv6, and all of their network's clients/devices are new/modern, enabling jumbo frames on their router and those clients/devices might not be as much of an issue as we're saying it can be...and that's the key: running a single stack v6 network with modern devices configured to be able to handle whatever size of jumbo frames (that wiki should be read (especially the jumbogram link) by everyone - it's not just 1500 and jumbo: there are various jumbos to choose from lol) is smallest for the devices in question. It's a different kind of network and connection tuning, and increasingly available and possible in some places. This is forward thinking AFAIC, that could eventually become "normal" for SOHO networking...and with the transition to IPv6, it'll be like the internet is new all over again as some things aren't transitioned yet and then POP! they are.

(I wonder if OP is in Taiwan by chance. my next guess is South Korea)
 

John Davis

Regular Contributor
On the WAN side ( which is where jumbo frames would be most useful - specially for people having to run pppoe upstream on gigabit connection where using minii-jumbos would allow them to avoid a 1492 mtu ) the kernel iis currently not compiled with the flags to allow this.

I asked Rmerlin about this and since he’s not building a custom kermel that is something ASUS themselves would need to fix
 

dhendodong

Occasional Visitor
actually for my use case i want to implement it on my LAN i notice that when using iperf with my 2 NAS with 1500 and 9000 mtu on a 2.5gb network the speed difference is very high 1500/no jumbo frame i get speed between 1.8-2.2gbit while on 9000 i get steady 2.5 to 2.8gbit.
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
actually for my use case i want to implement it on my LAN i notice that when using iperf with my 2 NAS with 1500 and 9000 mtu on a 2.5gb network the speed difference is very high 1500/no jumbo frame i get speed between 1.8-2.2gbit while on 9000 i get steady 2.5 to 2.8gbit.
~600Mbps is not insignificant...that's 75MBps...
You need to look at NIC config for all your devices and find the highest frame size they all support, and set that for them. might be tough for wifi-only clients
On the WAN side ( which is where jumbo frames would be most useful - specially for people having to run pppoe upstream on gigabit connection where using minii-jumbos would allow them to avoid a 1492 mtu ) the kernel iis currently not compiled with the flags to allow this.

I asked Rmerlin about this and since he’s not building a custom kermel that is something ASUS themselves would need to fix
then we need to start agitating over on that forum ;-D
 

dhendodong

Occasional Visitor
~600Mbps is not insignificant...that's 75MBps...
You need to look at NIC config for all your devices and find the highest frame size they all support, and set that for them. might be tough for wifi-only clients

then we need to start agitating over on that forum ;-D
yes but it is not stable sometimes it even drops lower and i am confident CPU is not the bottleneck its a ryzen multi threaded cpu, ssd also, and i noticed on 9000 mtu speed is very stable on iperf
 

heysoundude

Very Senior Member
diversion for network ad-blocking, SkyNet for firewall, unbound for DNS, ntpMerlin for clock...?
It could be that one of them is possibly mis-configured or can't handle larger sizes...
 

John Davis

Regular Contributor
actually for my use case i want to implement it on my LAN i notice that when using iperf with my 2 NAS with 1500 and 9000 mtu on a 2.5gb network the speed difference is very high 1500/no jumbo frame i get speed between 1.8-2.2gbit while on 9000 i get steady 2.5 to 2.8gbit.

it's your NIC - I get a sustained 2.37gbits/sec on iperf3 from my desktop pc to my 2.5gbe equipped NAS without jumbo frames.

I initially started with a realtek 2.5gbe nic which was hopeless, and briefly tried an aqc107 based card (not much better - though hopefully they've improved their driver support in the last 2 years) - since I went to an intel 10gbe card zero issues

not quite sure how you're getting 2.8gbit/s over a 2.5gbit/s link either.....
 

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