[Official Release] AiMesh Firmware v3.0.0.4.384.20308 for All Supported Products

sl4fko

Regular Contributor
And how do I perform this?
 

Grisu

Part of the Furniture
SSH to router, list NVRAM, turn on/off 2.4G, list NVRAM again and have a look what has been changed.
Then SSH to node and change this value.
nvram show | sort
to limit output use: nvram show | grep -E 'wl0' | sort
maybe something like this: nvram set wl0_radio=0
to save it: nvram commit
 
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Neil62

Senior Member
My 2xRT-AC86U 3.0.0.4.384_81351 AiMesh with SB6141 cable modem is on main level with a 77' wireless backhaul. The house router covers (3) 1650 sq ft levels; the detached garage node covers 1750 sq ft; brick construction. Both cover 2-acre lot. The backhaul signal is 3 bars 5G. Roaming Assistant node steering is enabled with defaults. Smart Connect node band steering is disabled. The SSIDs are separate. The channels are fixed. AiProtection is enabled.

OE
Really great notes, thank you very much for taking the time to create it. Just a question for yourself do have both Multi-User MIMO and Enable IGMP Snooping, disabled or enabled across both bands?
 
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OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Really great notes, thank you very much for taking the time to create it. Just a question for yourself do have both Multi-User MIMO and Enable IGMP Snooping, disabled or enabled?

You're most welcome.

Defaults unless noted otherwise, so both enabled by default. I have not had reason to look into those settings... something to learn about.

OE
 

CaptnDanLKW

Senior Member
Finally some RT-AC86U Smart Connect love. Fixed Channels with SC may help a lot of people who try SC but eventually turn it off in frustration. Can't wait for Merlin's inclusion of this GPL into a future release.
 

unclebuk

Senior Member
My 2xRT-AC86U 81792 AiMesh with SB6141 modem is on the main level with a 77' wireless backhaul. The house router covers (3) 1650 sq ft levels; the detached garage node covers 1750 sq ft; brick construction. Both cover a 2-acre lot. The backhaul signal is 3 bars 5G. Roaming Assistant node steering is enabled with defaults. Smart Connect node band steering is enabled with same SSIDs and fixed channels. AiProtection is enabled. A USB 3.0 HDD is attached in 2.0 Mode.

This replaced a 2xRT-AC68U AiMesh with a backhaul signal of 2-3 bars (no WiFi Range Boost... backhaul would drop). Smart Connect is not supported on AC1900/AC68/AC66 B1; the SSIDs had to be separate.

Speedtest.net results...

My install notes:
o ASUS AiMesh = router/AP + nodes = root node + remote nodes
Use the highest spec router as the root node.
A site router is required when the root node is in AP Mode.


AiMesh uses performance routers with features including Asuswrt-Merlin, extends the network, improves roaming, centralizes management with auto configuration of WLANs and wireless backhauls, maintains fast/dedicated wired/wireless backhauls, and can be self-recovered and incrementally upgraded (router = node = router).

OE
Awesome detail and very informative.

Quick question: what is meant by "site router" (A site router is required when the root node is in AP Mode.)

Thank you.
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Awesome detail and very informative.

Quick question: what is meant by "site router" (A site router is required when the root node is in AP Mode.)

Thank you.

ASUS AiMesh = router/AP + nodes = root node + remote nodes
A non-AiMesh site router is required when the root node is in AP Mode.

'Site router' means some other non-AiMesh router on site performing the routing for the network that includes an AiMesh in AP mode.

The mesh root node is the node that is controlling the mesh system. An AiMesh root node can be in either router mode or AP mode. If it is in AP mode, then you need an upstream router to wire it to. This upstream router is not of the AiMesh... it's just the site/location/network router.

AiMesh can be tricky to discuss because it's a bunch of routers to begin with.

I'm not an authority on this... it's just that if I want to document things learned to share with others, then I have to adopt some terminology... subject to change, of course.

OE
 

unclebuk

Senior Member
ASUS AiMesh = router/AP + nodes = root node + remote nodes
A non-AiMesh site router is required when the root node is in AP Mode.

'Site router' means some other non-AiMesh router on site performing the routing for the network that includes an AiMesh in AP mode.

The mesh root node is the node that is controlling the mesh system. An AiMesh root node can be in either router mode or AP mode. If it is in AP mode, then you need an upstream router to wire it to. This upstream router is not of the AiMesh... it's just the site/location/network router.

AiMesh can be tricky to discuss because it's a bunch of routers to begin with.

I'm not an authority on this... it's just that if I want to document things learned to share with others, then I have to adopt some terminology... subject to change, of course.

OE
Acknowledged.

One other question: what's this in reference to:
"The remote node limit was 4 star nodes, or 3 star nodes plus 1 daisy-chain node max.

Excuse the interrogation.
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
One other question: what's this in reference to:
"The remote node limit was 4 star nodes, or 3 star nodes plus 1 daisy-chain node max.

An early AiMesh FAQ on Asus.com that no longer exists suggested these limits for connecting nodes to the router. I'm sure there are still real limits to the number of nodes your can connect, and how you can connect them, but they are probably not worth trying to quantify beyond 'use common sense, it's a consumer mesh system', or 'if it doesn't work, it's too many'.

Also, the FAQ was a bit ambiguous when it comes to trying to determine how wireless backhauls might choose to interconnect the nodes.

However, it remains a fair consideration... number of nodes and their topology... so I mention it to keep it in mind.

As it turns out, you don't need many nodes to blast WiFi all over the place... 2 or 3 will likely cover it. So, the original somewhat nebulous FAQ is not missed.

I suggest the ideal limit is 4 remote nodes wired to the router/root node for a star topology.

My notes are brief to keep them brief, and because the forum imposes a character limit that keeps shaving them down.

OE
 

unclebuk

Senior Member
An early AiMesh FAQ on Asus.com that no longer exists suggested these limits for connecting nodes to the router. I'm sure there are still real limits to the number of nodes your can connect, and how you can connect them, but they are probably not worth trying to quantify beyond 'use common sense, it's a consumer mesh system', or 'if it doesn't work, it's too many'.

Also, the FAQ was a bit ambiguous when it comes to trying to determine how wireless backhauls might choose to interconnect the nodes.

However, it remains a fair consideration... number of nodes and their topology... so I mention it to keep it in mind.

As it turns out, you don't need many nodes to blast WiFi all over the place... 2 or 3 will likely cover it. So, the original somewhat nebulous FAQ is not missed.

I suggest the ideal limit is 4 remote nodes wired to the router/root node for a star topology.

My notes are brief to keep them brief, and because the forum imposes a character limit that keeps shaving them down.

OE
Excellent, much appreciated. I am starting to better understand AIMesh and how to implement it.
 

takalti

Occasional Visitor
Thanks for this. One thing I will note is that if I attempt to turn off:
- disable Airtime Fairness per band (incompatible with some adapters)
- disable Universal/Implicit Beamforming per band (proprietary/problematic)
I get a message saying my Lyra Trio's do not support that option (my current setup is a DSL-AC68U on .386 with 2x Lyra Trio nodes on .384).

My 2xRT-AC86U 9.0.0.4.386_40577 AiMesh 2.0 RC2-7 beta with SB6141 cable modem is on main level with a 77' wireless backhaul. The router covers (3) 1650 sq ft levels; the detached garage node covers 1750 sq ft; both cover a 2-acre lot; brick construction. The 5.0 backhaul DN/UP PHY rates are 877/780 Mbps (3/3 and 3/4 bars). Roaming Assistant node steering is enabled with defaults. Smart Connect node band steering is enabled with same SSIDs and fixed channels. AiProtection is enabled.

This replaced 2xRT-AC68U with a 5.0 backhaul signal of 2/4 bars. Smart Connect is not supported on AC1900/AC68/AC66 B1; the SSIDs should be different.

Speedtest.net results...

My install notes:
o ASUS AiMesh = router/AP + nodes = root node + remote nodes
Use the highest spec router as the root node.
A non-AiMesh router is used when the root node is in AP Mode.
Mixing routers/firmware, wired/wireless backhauls, and star (ideal)/daisy-chain topologies is permitted.
o AC86U, AC68U, N66U
o Reset FAQ, Reset Button/webUI Restore, WPS Button Hard Reset
o AiMesh FAQs, Lessons, Insights, Speeds, Beam Forming, Roaming/Secrets, Smart Connect, Troubleshooting/Addendum
o Use a UPS to protect network and firmware upgrades*

o Power OFF router and modem
o Wire router WAN to modem (blue tape/cable*), and router LAN to PC
o Power ON router and wait for it to settle (power cycle/drain)
o Hold router Reset until Power LED flashes slowly and wait (factory default reset)
o Power ON modem and wait
o Browse to router.asus.com or 192.168.50.1 or 192.168.1.1 and login to router webUI when required (default credentials are admin, admin)
o Perform router Quick Setup for firmware check/upgrade (see version link for release notes)
o Perform router Restore w/Initialize and wait (factory default reset w/initialization AFTER firmware upgrade)
Reset Button/webUI Restore clears settings in NVRAM; reboot restores factory defaults from CFE.
WebUI Restore w/Initialize also clears logged data in /jffs folder.
o Power OFF router and modem

o Repeat above for node except keep power ON for AiMesh install
o Disconnect node and place near router (77' works here)

o Wire router WAN to modem (blue tape/cable*), and router LAN to PC
o Power ON router and wait
o Power ON modem and wait
o Perform router Quick Setup and configuration:
Disable Smart Connect and set different SSIDs and fixed, non-DFS channels for more predictable/stable WiFi (avoids band contention and Auto/DFS channel disruption, and allows segmenting clients across WLANs).
Otherwise, enable Smart Connect with same SSIDs.
- set 2.4 WLAN to OE-24, n, 20 MHz, ch 1,6,11 (or 1,5,9,13), WPA2-AES*
- set 5.0 WLAN to OE-50, n/ac, 20/40/80 MHz, ch 36-48 52-144 (DFS) 149-161 165, WPA2-AES*
- do not hide SSIDs (speeds client connection)
- confirm ALL bands are broadcasting (required to add node)
- set Roaming Assistant 2.4 RSSI threshold to -62 dBm (2.4/5.0 defaults are -70/-70 dBm)
- disable Airtime Fairness per band (incompatible with some adapters)
- disable Universal/Implicit Beamforming per band (proprietary/problematic)
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Thanks for this. One thing I will note is that if I attempt to turn off:
- disable Airtime Fairness per band (incompatible with some adapters)
- disable Universal/Implicit Beamforming per band (proprietary/problematic)
I get a message saying my Lyra Trio's do not support that option (my current setup is a DSL-AC68U on .386 with 2x Lyra Trio nodes on .384).

I wonder if that means the AC68 setting could not be applied to the Lyras because they don't have the feature, or because they do not allow it being changed. I suspect the Lyra hardware does not support those features. You could remove one to reset it and login to its webUI to find out... are forget about it.

Lyras feel niche and neglected to me, so I would downgrade all-around to firmware that works and wait for WiFi 6e to upgrade; or replace them now with AC86U or AC66U B1 or AX something, if you must.

OE
 

takalti

Occasional Visitor
Yeah thats the way I am heading. Good idea ref the setup - I might reset the lyras and then make the settings changes before adopting them and see what happens.
 

takalti

Occasional Visitor
replaced them with an AC86U (and moved the 68U to a node). Fingers crossed! Once the new 386 Merlin is out I will give that a go but will stay on stock till then.
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
replaced them with an AC86U (and moved the 68U to a node). Fingers crossed! Once the new 386 Merlin is out I will give that a go but will stay on stock till then.

So you moved the DSL-AC68U off the WAN connection? Good move, if you don't need its DSL modem. :)

OE
 

takalti

Occasional Visitor
Yes I did. I initially bought it because I was on a FTTN connection which needs the VDSL capability. We are now in a house with FTTC, so has a PPPOE WAN connection to the router.

So far things havent gone well - the best solution has been to run the AC86U stand alone and leave the 68 off. For some reason when it is on as an AImesh node our chromecasts have issues (buffering). am working on some troubleshooting now though, but need to work my timing around when the family is not using the network.

Edit: seems to be better now - I actually took the time to go through the settings: universal beamforming and airtime fairness off. bound some devices (that dont move) to their nearest point, and rebooted the whole lot. It did occur to me that I hadnt done a single reboot after the initial setup. See how it goes for a few days, but right now no-one is complaining!
 
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OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Yes I did. I initially bought it because I was on a FTTN connection which needs the VDSL capability. We are now in a house with FTTC, so has a PPPOE WAN connection to the router.

So far things havent gone well - the best solution has been to run the AC86U stand alone and leave the 68 off. For some reason when it is on as an AImesh node our chromecasts have issues (buffering). am working on some troubleshooting now though, but need to work my timing around when the family is not using the network.

Edit: seems to be better now - I actually took the time to go through the settings: universal beamforming and airtime fairness off. bound some devices (that dont move) to their nearest point, and rebooted the whole lot. It did occur to me that I hadnt done a single reboot after the initial setup. See how it goes for a few days, but right now no-one is complaining!

A system reboot is helpful.

Regarding the buffering issue, determine how the device is connecting... node, band, link speed... my Chromecast Gen2 has no problem connecting to the nearest node, 5.0, at 400+ Mbps... so no buffering. Buffering suggests a 2.4 band connection.

This is an ancient thread... I'm running the RC2-7 beta firmware... it seems to need the 2.4 Roaming Assistant RSSI threshold raised to around -62 for my 2-node spread.

OE
 

takalti

Occasional Visitor
hmm... I just realised that the firmware available on the Asus website for Australia is lower than the RC firmware located here. Is there a regional difference in the firmware, or does the region setting in the firmware itself adjust the parameters? Might have to update it.
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
hmm... I just realised that the firmware available on the Asus website for Australia is lower than the RC firmware located here. Is there a regional difference in the firmware, or does the region setting in the firmware itself adjust the parameters? Might have to update it.

I don't know the ins and outs of firmware regionalization... but I would assume the RC beta firmware here is only listed here and nobody has cautioned not to use it down under, for example. I would be concerned that it may not be ready yet/ever for the DSL 68U.

OE
 

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