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Only achieving 10% of my gigabit plan

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skarz

New Around Here
I have a Gigabit plan through Wave Broadband and I can only actually achieve 10% of those speeds. My moden is a Hitron CGNVM-3589 which is in residential gateway mode. My router is an Asus RT-AC66U with AsusWRT-Merlin installed. I tested my Internet with my 20011 MacBook Pro both wired and wirelessly. I even plugged my MBP directly in to the modem to see if the router was the bottleneck. All networking cable is Cat5e. I live in a rural area and the only router I can see other than my own is the one my neighbor has in his barn. All tests were done on speedof.me and dslreports.com. House was built in early 80's.

Wired: ~120Mbps
Wifi: ~80Mbps


Any tips or suggestions you have to boost my connection speed would be greatly appreciated. Otherwise I'm spending the extra $240 a year for nothing.
 
Have tried your MacBook Pro some where else to make sure it can run at wired GIG speeds? I doubt wireless will run that fast.
 
Not clear if the 120Mbps is directly connected to your modem or not. If it is directly connected to your modem, you may need to reset your modem after the speed bump up. That's the way that it works around here if you have cable broadband. You don't see speed increases until the modem has been reset. According to what I see on the internet, the modem itself has 32 bonded channels, so the modem can support the 1Gbps speed, assuming that it's working right.

If the 120Mbps is connected to your router, I'd reset that router to defaults and see what the wired speed is without changing any settings. It may just be that the RT-AC66U (an old router) may be on its last legs, and it's going as fast as it can *smile*. If you can try another router that can do 1Gbps, and see if that works, that would be great. Again, just reset a test router to factory defaults and don't change any settings. I have a feeling that you'll end up replacing the RT-AC66U router.

According to what I see online, the MacBook Pro 2011 supports 1Gbps wired connection, and you're far from seeing that. I think that I'd focus on getting the wired connection speed up to 1Gbps, and then work on the wireless connection speed.
 
Not clear if the 120Mbps is directly connected to your modem or not. If it is directly connected to your modem, you may need to reset your modem after the speed bump up. That's the way that it works around here if you have cable broadband. You don't see speed increases until the modem has been reset. According to what I see on the internet, the modem itself has 32 bonded channels, so the modem can support the 1Gbps speed, assuming that it's working right.

If the 120Mbps is connected to your router, I'd reset that router to defaults and see what the wired speed is without changing any settings. It may just be that the RT-AC66U (an old router) may be on its last legs, and it's going as fast as it can *smile*. If you can try another router that can do 1Gbps, and see if that works, that would be great. Again, just reset a test router to factory defaults and don't change any settings. I have a feeling that you'll end up replacing the RT-AC66U router.

According to what I see online, the MacBook Pro 2011 supports 1Gbps wired connection, and you're far from seeing that. I think that I'd focus on getting the wired connection speed up to 1Gbps, and then work on the wireless connection speed.
Have tried your MacBook Pro some where else to make sure it can run at wired GIG speeds? I doubt wireless will run that fast.
The ASUS AC66U sports a single core broadcom MIPS at 600Mhz which does around 100Mb/s of NAT without hardware acceleration, this seems to be the case of what the OP is experiences. It has nothing to do with the connection, rather the CPU is fully utilised. A new router is needed for those speeds but it is unlikely you'll ever get that on wifi from a single client.

Some macbooks come with 3 channel wifi AC and other laptops, rarely. So most common are single and dual channel. On average you'll see 50% of your rated link speed during a good day. To put this into perspective, if you're connected to your router and the link speed shows 400Mb/s, expect 200Mb/s. For 3 channel wifi AC expect between 600-700Mb/s practical on a good day with the highest speed as your link speed, thats if both the laptop and router is 3 channel.

You do need a router that supports your connection. Pick based on your skill and feature needs, avoid brands like dlink.
 
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