1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice

Welcome To SNBForums

SNBForums is a community for anyone who wants to learn about or discuss the latest in wireless routers, network storage and the ins and outs of building and maintaining a small network.

If you'd like to post a question, simply register and have at it!

While you're at it, please check out SmallNetBuilder for product reviews and our famous Router Charts, Ranker and plenty more!

Featured Qualcomm introduces their first 802.11ay 60GHz chipsets

Discussion in 'General Wireless Discussion' started by Balance, Oct 16, 2018.

  1. Balance

    Balance Occasional Visitor

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    qualcomm_logo.jpg
    Qualcomm announced today their first 60GHz Wi-Fi chipsets based on the 802.11ay-draft specification.

    QCA64x8 series (QCA6438 and QCA6428) for fixed infrastructure and QCA64x1 series (QCA6431 and QCA6421) for mobile devices will provide 802.11ay connectivity. Qualcomm is working together with Facebook to use the chips in their Terragraph network.

    They don't talk about the technical specifications. 802.11ay adds MIMO and OFDMA to 60GHz for example, it pretty comparable to 802.11ax but with channels of 2 GHz wide on 60 GHz. Real world speeds of 20 Gb/s should be reachable, which enables lossless wireless display transfers for example.

     
  2. Razor512

    Razor512 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2012
    Messages:
    442
    Well 802.11ad was rather short lived. It seems like they are shooting them self in the foot with the 60GHz band. Tons of promises but nothing seems to get done with it due to companies being scared to make client devices.
     
  3. Fatawan

    Fatawan Occasional Visitor

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    How practical will this be? Won't a sheet of paper block a 60 GHz transmission? I think about these things as I am building a new house, and wiring it in the best future-proof way that I can. Even if we end up with AP's in every room for 60GHz wireless, the signal would get blocked by virtually anything. Where is deployment practical?
     
  4. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    13,631
    Think of 802.11ad/ay as super fast Bluetooth. It's intended as high bandwidth point-to-point connection for peripherals like laptop docks and VR headsets.
     
  5. RMerlin

    RMerlin Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2012
    Messages:
    28,550
    Location:
    Canada
    I wish they stopped using the "Wi-Fi" labeling with 802.11ad/802.11ay. It's causing nothing but confusion among consumers (but then, maybe that's the intended goal).
     
  6. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    13,631
    I understand your point. But one of the key features of ad/ay is that they work more like Wi-Fi than Bluetooth. In Windows the ad connection is made via the Wi-Fi settings, not Bluetooth or something else.

    This technology would have gone the way of Wireless USB and other 60 GHz technologies if the WFA had not brought it into its tent...
     
  7. sfx2000

    sfx2000 Part of the Furniture

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2011
    Messages:
    13,579
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    I still remember being at the IEEE Plenary in Atlanta many years back when the initial discussions started in earnest for the 60GHz PHY...

    There are good use cases for the 11ad/ay, although with the WiFi branding by WFA, those use cases are not as clear as they could be.

    IEEE did a good job of integrating the 60GHz PHY into the 802.11 MAC, so this made driver support fairly straightforward to implement...

    No doubt - but the USB Implementers Forum has a bad track record of integrating Wireless into their specs - to whit, the WiMedia (UWB) stuff from the mid-2000's... WiMedia did get into IEEE, over in the 802.15.4WG, but it really should have been assigned to 802.11 - part of that was politics, as it always is...

    UWB easily did 200Mb/s - even two buildings away :D

    UWB had 7.5GHz of spectrum (11ad only has 2.16GHz per channel, 11ay can bond up to 4 for 8.65GHz) - so Shannon says it was going to have some decent performance... and it was in the noise floor - see below:

    Screen Shot 2018-10-17 at 4.11.21 PM.png

    But it ran afoul of other 802.11 and 802.15 efforts, and kind of died... and it took out more than a few silicon startups when things failed to get standardized -- UWB never really went away - there are companies still developing product around the UWB Impulse Radio mode for fine grained positioning - starting to see more of that in the robotics space these days...
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2018