Question regarding Gaming port on Asus Routers

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Hey guys, I was hoping someone could give me some clarity on the Gaming port priority feature Assus offers on their routers.
From my understanding, Port 1 on the LAN is also the gaming port which will prioritize traffic for gaming. This part I'm clear about, what I'm unclear about is, is it on automatically and not able to physically be disabled? Reason being is, I don't have a single device connected to LAN 1, that's where I connected the switch with all of my wired devices. I raise the question because of the following:
When I'm am streaming internet content say on one of my Apple TVs, and then do something else, at the same time, say run a speed test on the Mac, or a wireless device, the speedtest is slower, and I don't remember this ever happening on the Non Asus routers I've used that didn't have this game port feature. Since I don't need the feature, I've made sure to disable all UPNP, and game features in the web UI.

The settings I've disabled are as follows:
WAN enable UPNP set to disabled
GFORCE Now UPNP set to disabled
UPNP Media server set to disabled.
ALL visible forms of QOS are also disabled, as well as AI Protection, any kind of parental controls, or traffic settings.

I've also noticed this only seems to happen when streaming internet content, not when streaming over the LAN say from Plex, to one of the TVs.
When I say the speed on the secondary device is slower, I'm not talking real drastically slower, I'm talking dropping from betwee 920 to 940 Mbps down to somewhere in the 800's to high 700's.

So, my last questions are:
1. To avoid triggering this function, would using a different LAN port, other than 1, be the solution, or have I missed a setting? Thanks
It's not a huge issue, and it doesn't seem to affect network performance on the surface, I just happened to notice it when testing speeds after I had some real activity going on the network to see how much bandwidth I was actually pulling in the different things I might do simultaneously.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Realize this is purely a guess on my part. It's difficult to know exactly what's going on inside the OEM firmware when it comes to a feature like this, but I can venture an educated guess.

Most likely that LAN port has been assigned to its own ethernet segments and IP network, separate from the rest of the LAN ports. Then QoS is used to give it higher priority based on that IP network.

Of course, it could be used for ANYTHING that needs higher priority, such as other realtime apps (e.g., VOIP).

What I don't know is if you can necessarily disable it. That's something you'd have to determine by locating that option in the GUI. And simply disabling other features you believe to be related (e.g., QoS, UPnP) may NOT be sufficient. Despite your best efforts, perhaps QoS remains active at all times.

The problem w/ QoS is that it typically disables CTF, and CTF is necessary to get the FULL bandwidth available from your ISP. But neither CTF nor QoS affect the performance of local access between devices, only the internet.

In short, it *seems* like QoS is enabled, and by extension CTF is necessarily disabled (or at least disabled for that one port) at all times.

That's why I tend to shy away from features like this. What they offer may work against you if you don't actually need or use it as intended, esp. if they don't offer a way to explicitly and fully disable it.

Again, I'm just speculating based on your personal observations. It could be something completely different for all I know.
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Realize this is purely a guess on my part. It's difficult to know exactly what's going on inside the OEM firmware when it comes to a feature like this, but I can venture an educated guess.

Most likely that LAN port has been assigned to its own ethernet segments and IP network, separate from the rest of the LAN ports. Then QoS is used to give it higher priority based on that IP network.

Of course, it could be used for ANYTHING that needs higher priority, such as other realtime apps (e.g., VOIP).

What I don't know is if you can necessarily disable it. That's something you'd have to determine by locating that option in the GUI. And simply disabling other features you believe to be related (e.g., QoS, UPnP) may NOT be sufficient. Despite your best efforts, perhaps QoS remains active at all times.

The problem w/ QoS is that it typically disables CTF, and CTF is necessary to get the FULL bandwidth available from your ISP. But neither CTF nor QoS affect the performance of local access between devices, only the internet.

In short, it *seems* like QoS is enabled, and by extension CTF is necessarily disabled (or at least disabled for that one port) at all times.

That's why I tend to shy away from features like this. What they offer may work against you if you don't actually need or use it as intended, esp. if they don't offer a way to explicitly and fully disable it.

Again, I'm just speculating based on your personal observations. It could be something completely different for all I know.
Well, since I only use ONE LAN port on the router to go to my switch, which then manages the rest of the wired network, simply changing the port would probably just eliminate this question. I mainly used port one out of logic since it's the first port. I setup my network this way because it's much easier to deal with, only 3 plugs for the router this way. Power, WAN to Modem, and then LAN to switch. Then the switch eliminates really long runs because it's in a more centralized location than the router is able to be. Anyway, I was mainly asking out of curiosity here. When I initially set up the router, I used LAN port 2, I'll put the switch back on that port and see if I still notice the slight slow downs when using multiple devices.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Under normal circumstances, one LAN port is identical to another. ASUS has simply decided to treat LAN port #1 differently, giving it higher priority. But if you can live w/o the port, yeah, just ignore it and use the others.
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Under normal circumstances, one LAN port is identical to another. ASUS has simply decided to treat LAN port #1 differently, giving it higher priority. But if you can live w/o the port, yeah, just ignore it and use the others.
I'll just wait until I have a game console, or something and connect it directly to that port. The rest of my devices that go through the switch don't need any special priority. I moved the switch connection back to LAN 2.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
OK, did a couple speedtests from the Mac while streaming video from YouTube on the Apple TV 4K at the same time, and it's a much better result, than when using LAN one: https://www.speedtest.net/my-result/d/448097794
These were the results right after switching ports without any other major activity on the router: https://www.speedtest.net/my-result/d/448096531
"much better"? That looks well within the normal margin of error for the speed test.

FWIW I've never been able to detect any difference between LAN port 1 and the other ports. I've assumed that's because I don't have QoS enabled.
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
"much better"? That looks well within the normal margin of error for the speed test.

FWIW I've never been able to detect any difference between LAN port 1 and the other ports. I've assumed that's because I don't have QoS enabled.
I didn't post the results that were worse. I did that test about a week ago. Those results were down in the 700-800 range while streaming at the same time. The two I posted above, yes are more in the normal spec of things.
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
@ColinTaylor : The thing to remember here is, most of the routers I've used prior to the Asus, were much simpler, meaning they didn't have all the settings the Asus did, and either just did things automatically, or didn't support certain features. So, whenever I run into a glitch now, it's just a matter of learning which setting controls that, or which feature is on / off that should be in the opposite state than it is to correct whatever the problem is.
The last time I used any kind of advanced router software was close to 3 to 5 years ago (give or take) when I ran DD-WRT on a Netgear Nighthawk R7000. So, in using the router day to day, I'm still running into things I've been out of practice dealing with for a while, or am going on outdated info on how to correct the problem.

That, and I've only had gigabit Internet for a couple months compared to years of 400, and 200 Mbps packages before that. So with that said, having the faster speed has taught me things I need to be aware of, that I didn't need to, or noticed prior to the upgrade.
 
Last edited:

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Like you I'd also like to know how the gaming port on my router is meant to work, even if I never make use of it. I tried testing it again just now using a similar test setup to yourself. Again I could find no discernible difference between the ports. But then my maximum internet speed is 660Mbps so perhaps it only becomes apparent at higher speeds.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
Like you I'd also like to know how the gaming port on my router is meant to work, even if I never make use of it. I tried testing it again just now using a similar test setup to yourself. Again I could find no discernible difference between the ports. But then my maximum internet speed is 660Mbps so perhaps it only becomes apparent at higher speeds.

Does the use of LAN port #1 result in a different IP network being assigned from the other LAN ports?

P.S. I'm assuming the feature is enabled on LAN port #1 at the time (NOT even sure if you can enable/disable it at will).
 
Last edited:

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Like you I'd also like to know how the gaming port on my router is meant to work, even if I never make use of it. I tried testing it again just now using a similar test setup to yourself. Again I could find no discernible difference between the ports. But then my maximum internet speed is 660Mbps so perhaps it only becomes apparent at higher speeds.
or the particular time / day I did the test the speeds could have been affected by multiple factors as well. I'm also going to have another look at the coax splitter, I have a funny feeling the Spectrum Tech when he put it back together after testing cable speed may have put the wires on the wrong ports that may have caused issues. Most of splitters I'm familiar with are a Y configuration. One input and two outputs. There is no wire on the side that should be typically be the input and both cables are on the side that would typically be the two outputs
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
Does the use of LAN port #1 result in a different IP network being assigned from the other LAN ports?
No. LAN port #1 is exactly the same as the other LAN ports in terms of its network configuration. If there's something different about it it's not visible in the user space (e.g. it's inside a kernel module). That's why I said maybe it's only active/visible when QoS is enabled. That's something I don't know because I never use QoS.
 
Last edited:

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Splitter is fine, I had looked at it wrong when I cleaned up initially after they had given me the new modem with the 2.5G port they give out for the gigabit package.

EDIT: Just a note: They gave me a splitter because I have good strong signal coming in, that's actually slightly too high which can also cause problems. So, the splitter is there to attempt to lower it enough into more overall acceptable range. By the way, I haven't really talked in detail, but what does high signal do, when it comes to not being a good thing, can it burn out the modem internals?
 
Last edited:

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Too high a signal distorts.

The 'modem' is designed for (a worse) average signal.
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Too high a signal distorts.

The 'modem' is designed for (a worse) average signal.
Thanks, as long as I've been using cable internet, I haven't had a really detailed understanding on how things should be working / set, so while I've had an overall stable connection, I just haven't been aware of things to check such as things like this to see if maybe some of the speed fluctuations might be connected to an overly high signal, even with the splitter. I would gather, distortion could also cause jitter and other spikes, and dips, or are those other issues not related to signal ? The good news is, I don't have any packet loss, and any jitter I have, isn't extremely high, but if there are things I can check on my end, that maybe I haven't that could improve things, even a little, I'll do that.

In my situation, there are only a few things I could check though, mainly the connection to the modem, as the coax line comes in through the wall from outside. There is no jack, it's a straight run from the box, which is up on a pole, I can't get to.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Think of it a little bit like a microphone with the gain set very high and the mic capsules only capable of having low to mid-volume (vocal) capabilities. While a (screaming) heavy metal band may sound good with this setup, it may be less than ideal for a singer with a more pure voice like Anne Murray. With the latter, all the nuances may be lost, with the former, that breakup of the original signal (the actual voice) may enhance a particular song, even if the output isn't a photocopy replica of the original signal (the voice).

With an ISP connection, we don't want any distortion at all. Anything near the middle of what the modem expects is where I would strive to get the signal strength set to. Significantly more, or less, and the modem is simply less capable of giving the maximum the ISP can offer.
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
Think of it a little bit like a microphone with the gain set very high and the mic capsules only capable of having low to mid-volume (vocal) capabilities. While a (screaming) heavy metal band may sound good with this setup, it may be less than ideal for a singer with a more pure voice like Anne Murray. With the latter, all the nuances may be lost, with the former, that breakup of the original signal (the actual voice) may enhance a particular song, even if the output isn't a photocopy replica of the original signal (the voice).

With an ISP connection, we don't want any distortion at all. Anything near the middle of what the modem expects is where I would strive to get the signal strength set to. Significantly more, or less, and the modem is simply less capable of giving the maximum the ISP can offer.
OK, audio I understand, so from that prospective I hear what you're saying. Right now, everything is fine, in fact after I did what I did last evening, this morning when I checked things, the Speedtest was quite smooth. If I need to get the signal down any lower, what would happen if I added an additional splitter? I have two, but am only using one. I don't think I'll need it, so my question is mainly out of curiosity.
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
EDIT: Just a note: They gave me a splitter because I have good strong signal coming in, that's actually slightly too high which can also cause problems. So, the splitter is there to attempt to lower it enough into more overall acceptable range. By the way, I haven't really talked in detail, but what does high signal do, when it comes to not being a good thing, can it burn out the modem internals?
It's quite common for an incoming cable signal to be higher than required. The technician will measure the signal during installation and fit an attenuator of the appropriate value to lower the signal to within the correct operating range. Some splitters also have attenuated outputs so can be used as alternative to a dedicated attenuator.

53040800_icx6c2420d0fd45ba3fcfd348724b33c_1.jpg30x4-13203_01.jpg
 

iFrogMac

Senior Member
It's quite common for an incoming cable signal to be higher than required. The technician will measure the signal during installation and fit an attenuator of the appropriate value to lower the signal to within the correct operating range. Some splitters also have attenuated outputs so can be used as alternative to a dedicated attenuator.

View attachment 42857View attachment 42858
Right, that's why I'm not real concerned, since everything is working, and I'm getting the speeds with in the spec of what I'm paying for. Last evening I checked the splitter as I said, and found it was fine, I had looked at it wrong the first time. I noticed the cable to the modem had gotten loose, so I tightened that, made sure the cables on the splitter were also tight, so after doing those checks, things seem to be operating normally. I was more curious about why cable users seem to see more spikes and dips in speed tests over fiber, or other connection types. I don't think it's just me though, I think, it has to do with how cable networks operate. However, it never hurts to make sure I've covered everything I can do on my end to make sure it's as best as possible.

Thankfully, it looks like I have. Plus, the faster I've gone, the more sensitivity I've observed as well.

That's a big part of why I'm asking more questions now, than when I had the slower packages because I'm seeing more types of behavior differences now, than I did before.
 

Similar threads

Latest threads

Sign Up For SNBForums Daily Digest

Get an update of what's new every day delivered to your mailbox. Sign up here!
Top