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Roaming assistant

Discussion in 'ASUS Wireless' started by cdikland, May 16, 2019.

  1. cdikland

    cdikland Regular Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2013
    Messages:
    171
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I have never got this feature to work. Basically, I have 2 access points (AC68U) and 1 router (Ac86U) with same ssid but each with different channels (1,6,11). The Roaming Assistant is enabled on all with a switch over value of -70db. Well, I have wifi devices as low as -86DB and none ever switch to a AP closer by. In the case of the -86 device, I turned off the radio it was connected to and it then switched to an other AP and the RSSI shot up to -46db. Shutting off radio(s) is the only way I found I can "move" a device with a weak signal to another AP. Surely there must be a better way??


    Merlin FW : 384.11
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
  2. OzarkEdge

    OzarkEdge Very Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2018
    Messages:
    1,240
    Location:
    USA
    You could try stock firmware, AiMesh (requires stock firmware), and separate SSIDs (68Us do not support Smart Connect node band steering). This will use the same channel across the mesh for each band. Maybe your clients will roam better... maybe much better.

    OE
     
    Kingp1n and cdikland like this.
  3. s3n0

    s3n0 Occasional Visitor

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Messages:
    48
    Location:
    Slovakia
    The problem could also be on the client's side. Try to connect with the client to the secondary WiFi router. Then enter the password and save it (if you haven't already).

    Even if you use the same password and the same security for both wifi networks, the MAC address is different and some systems may also create a wifi list based on the MAC address. In other words, another MAC means another WiFi connection in the saved list. Some old operating systems retain many information about WiFi connection based on SSID but also MAC addresses. Since the MAC address is different in both cases of your two routers, the mobile device will not connect unless both of your routers are stored in the list of available WiFi. The WiFi list can also be based on other parameters (depending on the firmware in the mobile wifi device).

    I mean to say that not only a WiFi router must have support for roaming, but also a WiFi client should be able to handle or expect to use WiFi roaming.

    Some wifi devices (smartphones) have this feature built-in and must be enabled. On the other hand, other WiFi devices do not have this feature, so in this case it depends on how weak the signal will be processed in these devices.

    The roaming feature does just that, kicking the wifi client out of the router if the wifi signal is very weak. However the firmware can do that it will be cautiously trying to connect at least 3 times to the same SSID and then it will trying another available SSID in order (from the stored wifi list). So if the firmware does not assume the existence of possible roaming in your home, it tries to connect even after kicking it back to the same WiFi SSID / MAC from which it was just kicked out.

    Unfortunately, I'm not sure what roaming feature in your device (in your wifi client) is processing.
     
  4. EventPhotoMan

    EventPhotoMan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2018
    Messages:
    414
    With only two access points, why do you want this feature?

    Eg: if 192.168.1.1 is in the front of my house, and 192.168.1.2 is in the back of my house...
    If I go from 192.168.1.2 and get closer to 192.168.1.1; yes the device should flip over at -75 threshold (of what ever you set it at)
    The problem also happens when to continue past 192.168.1.1 and are going out of range of 192.168.1.1, (on the opposite side of 192.168.1.2) you will loose the signal too soon then normal, because of the roaming assistant.

    My suggestion is not to use the option, unless to are using four or more access points.
     
  5. EventPhotoMan

    EventPhotoMan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2018
    Messages:
    414
    I have more that 4 access points, and I find the devices boucing anyways from access point to access point.
    You can almost follow my iPhone from AP to AP... tracking

    Also, my 2.4 has considerable more range them my 5GHz. My SSID are all the same, therefor my iPhone will find the 2.4 first outside my home and as I go into the house, the 5G with automatically be picked up.
     
  6. EventPhotoMan

    EventPhotoMan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2018
    Messages:
    414
     
  7. EventPhotoMan

    EventPhotoMan Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2018
    Messages:
    414
    I'm not totally agreeing with your answer. Unless I'm corrected, it have noting to do with the client.

    As soon as the access point reaches the threshold of the signal strength, say -75db, it should disassociate.

    What I'm not sure about is how the access point decides when a consistant -75db is reached.

    Either way with only two access points, I would not use with feature.