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Featured Tenda MW6 Nova Whole Home Mesh WiFi System Reviewed

Discussion in 'Wireless Article Discussions' started by thiggins, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
    Tenda's Nova Whole Home Mesh WiFi System is the least expensive three-node Wi-Fi System you can buy. And it works.

    Read on SmallNetBuilder
     
  2. Mikefromnj

    Mikefromnj New Around Here

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    In the review it says that the Tenda MW6 supports ethernet backhaul. In the list of cons it says it does not. Does anyone know which is correct? Thanks

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2018
  3. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    My error. Ethernet backhaul is supported. I've corrected the review.
     
  4. Razor512

    Razor512 Senior Member

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    For the 5GHz results, I always wonder how some devices are able to break away from the pack and maintain a high throughput even with a weaker signal. Are they configured to simply force a higher PHY rate and balance retransmissions with overall throughput as long as the data is not corrupt, or is there something more going on?
     
  5. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    You can force MCS rate higher more aggressively at the risk of causing TCP/IP retransmissions, which will reduce throughput.

    I'm not sure what is going on here.
     
  6. Razor512

    Razor512 Senior Member

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    It is just one of the weird things with WiFi. For example if monitoring the throughput on a second by second basis, some file transfers may start off at a higher speed and then slowly level off at a lower rate, and the same behavior can be seen if doing a basic throughput benchmark. In the case of WiFi, if I start a transfer and for the first 4 seconds, it is transferring at 70MB/s and then gradually drops down to around 65MB/s, what was the router and client doing to get that initial higher speed? Why couldn't it just keep doing whatever it was doing to hold the initial 70MB/s since the first few MB of the resulting file did not get corrupt?

    There is obviously something that the AP and client does not like about the transfer rate being used, if can manage a higher transfer rate for a few seconds, then why not just keep that speed.
     
  7. thiggins

    thiggins Mr. Easy Staff Member

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    Drag and drop file transfers are not a good tool to look at second-by-second throughput. Windows, for instance, has a lot happening behind the scenes, such as using multiple threads, changing TCP/IP paramaters and other things that will affect throughput during tranfers.

    Before you use a tool to look at Wi-Fi performance, you should baseline it using Ethernet first.
     
  8. Razor512

    Razor512 Senior Member

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    It is something that I have noticed on a number of routers reviewed in the past, where some would be very consistent, but some others will have a few seconds of a higher throughput, then it will drop slightly over the course of a few seconds, and then level off for the remainder of the test. (back when you used to post graphs from ixchariot).
     

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