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Thinking of deploying a MoCa 2.5 network, what else needs to be done?

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andydsm

Occasional Visitor
Greetings!

I've been thinking about ways to get LAN connectivity throughout my apartment and so far, from what I've been able to gather, MoCa seems to be my best bet.
A bit of information:
- All walls are either brick or concrete, so digging into them to swap the coax for LAN cables is off the table. The existing coax runs have to be used.
- I am located in the EU (concerning equipment recommendation, but might be able to import what's needed from the US)
- The coax runs, end to end are rather long probably over 35-ish meters. Mentioning this, in case distance might be of concern.
- The coax cables and splitters are quite old (20+ years), not the best quality, although I used to have a DOCSIS 200Mbps internet connection for many years, prior to the current FTTH setup and signal was quite good.

In a nutshell, the idea is to opt out of the current coax TV provider and convert the apartment's entire coax network to a MoCa 2.5 internal network, then completely disconnect the external feed as it will no longer be needed (Switching to IPTV).
I have a separate symmetrical 1Gbps FTTH connection that enters the apartment and terminates to a PON modem, connected to a router and that router should be the starting point for the projected MoCa network (I've attached a rudimentary, kinda ugly, paint made diagram of the end goal).

For additional context (from the diagram), Room 1 is where main router is located and where the 1st MoCa adapter has to be, Room 2 houses a splitter where a TV used to be, got no plans to connect anything there anymore nor plug any RJ-45 devices, so no adapter needed. It's going to be just a coax connection point.
Rooms 3 and 4 are where MoCa adapters 2 and 3 should be connected, respectively. In Room 3, I plan to connect a second router for better Wifi coverage, while Room 4 will only have an IPTV box connected to the 3rd MoCa adapter.

The questions are, apart from 3x MoCa 2.5 adapters what else do I have to buy, to make the network run reliably and trouble free?
Which MoCa 2.5 adapters should I get and can I get them to work correctly, if I get them from the US?
Any other suggestions/ideas welcomed :)
 

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Is the coax in the wall RG59 or RG6 ?
If it is the old std UK coax cables for TV distribution, then may not work at all due to different impedance required for MOCA (75 ohm). Search other threads here about the issue.
 
Is the coax in the wall RG59 or RG6 ?
If it is the old std UK coax cables for TV distribution, then may not work at all due to different impedance required for MOCA (75 ohm). Search other threads here about the issue.

I'm not in the UK, if that's of any meaning about what the cables might be.
How can I determine between the 2 or more types?
 
The coax should be embossed or have printing with the specification of type along with temperature rating of jacket or IEC compliance std, etc. Hopefully, you can access a 1 meter length somewhere as most cable i have seen has the marking at least every meter or less.
 
The coax should be embossed or have printing with the specification of type along with temperature rating of jacket or IEC compliance std, etc. Hopefully, you can access a 1 meter length somewhere as most cable i have seen has the marking at least every meter or less.
Does this print on the jacket, shed any light what type the cable is?
 

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should be more text with that, but that sort of thing is what you are looking for. Was that hanging loose from one of the runs of coax or is that a cable connected to wall plate termination ?
 
should be more text with that, but that sort of thing is what you are looking for. Was that hanging loose from one of the runs of coax or is that a cable connected to wall plate termination ?
That's the only printed text I could find on the jacket. That particular cable is the extension from the splitter in room 2, where a TV used to be hooked up and looks identical to the few cm of cable that I can see poking out of the wall. I've saved 3 more extension cables that used to be hooked up to stuff around the apartment and 2 are identical to the Commscope from my 1st photo, but 1 of the removed extensions says RG6 75 Ohm and looks different which leads me to believe the in-wall runs are that Commscope stuff and this extension might have been hooked from one of the splitters to a device, later on.
 

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You indicated that you currently have TV service over a DOCCIS 3.0 modem ? Please show a picture of the connection and model number/brand.

All of that looks like RG6.
How is the cable service set up ?
Is there a box on the exterior of your apartment where the cable comes in ? You may be able to find more printing/embossed marking on either your cable or the provider cable to the box.
Was this cable system supporting satellite TV ?

i think you can work on the assumption that it is RG6. MOCA prefers that. Any splitters ( including satellite ) likely will need replacing with MOCA2.0 certified splitters if you need to use them. Any open ports on a splitter will need a 75 ohm termination cap.
 
You indicated that you currently have TV service over a DOCCIS 3.0 modem ? Please show a picture of the connection and model number/brand.

All of that looks like RG6.
How is the cable service set up ?
Is there a box on the exterior of your apartment where the cable comes in ? You may be able to find more printing/embossed marking on either your cable or the provider cable to the box.
Was this cable system supporting satellite TV ?

i think you can work on the assumption that it is RG6. MOCA prefers that. Any splitters ( including satellite ) likely will need replacing with MOCA2.0 certified splitters if you need to use them. Any open ports on a splitter will need a 75 ohm termination cap.
I used to have a DOCSIS internet service for many years, but have upgraded to FTTH since 4 or so years, so there's no DOCSIS modem anymore.
The coax network is setup to support terrestrial cable TV service, exclusively. Currently, each coax connected TVs have their own set top box, which is connected via HDMI to the TVs themselves. When I had the DOCSIS internet service, there was an additional DOCSIS modem connected in Room 1, at a second coax connection point (not indicated on the graph), which is currently sitting unused.
The TV provider (and old ISP provider) has installed a box where the coax equipment is located, in the basement section of our building, where all the coax cables begin their runs towards each floor, then split to the apartments.
The cable service is currently entering the apartment from 2 entry points (I know it's weird, but that's how it was done 20 years ago) and after I "sunset" the current coax TV service subscription, I can easily disconnect the external feed that splits into the 2 entry points and just connect the 2 points to each other, to make the MoCa network internal only.

In short, apart from the 3x MoCa adapters, I will need MoCa certified splitters, which will additionally require 75 Ohm termination cap, on each unused connection point?
You've mentioned to look for MoCa 2.0 splitters, are those going to work at 2.5 speeds, or do I need to look for 2.5 certified splitters?

EDIT:
Another question regarding splitters, can any splitter with a wider frequency range (say 5 - 2400MHz), be used in a MoCa 2.5 network or is it necessary to be explicitly MoCa 2.X compatible?
 
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any open cable end, be it a splitter port or a wall plate should be terminated with the 75 ohm cap.
A MOCA 2 certified splitter is rated up to 1675 MHz, the top end of the MOCA bands.


If you are using a splitter for the head end of the multple branches, best practice is to put a MOCA POE filter on the input port to better manage the signals. Without it, you can get some minor waveform degradation. You may never notice it.

Using a splitter rated for a higher frequency may or may not work as it depends on what it was designed for and how they implemented it. If you have some, try them. If they don't work out, then you know where to head.

Holland is one manufacturer. There are others. Look for MOCA 2.x certified. Compatible may work also.
 
any open cable end, be it a splitter port or a wall plate should be terminated with the 75 ohm cap.
A MOCA 2 certified splitter is rated up to 1675 MHz, the top end of the MOCA bands.


If you are using a splitter for the head end of the multple branches, best practice is to put a MOCA POE filter on the input port to better manage the signals. Without it, you can get some minor waveform degradation. You may never notice it.

Using a splitter rated for a higher frequency may or may not work as it depends on what it was designed for and how they implemented it. If you have some, try them. If they don't work out, then you know where to head.

Holland is one manufacturer. There are others. Look for MOCA 2.x certified. Compatible may work also.

Thanks a lot for the info!
Feel like I have a grasp on what needs to be done and purchased, will be on the lookout for deals on MoCa 2.5 adapters, as they are quite pricy per unit and I'll need 3.
Regarding the splitters, I found these 5-2450MHz units locally, there's no in-depth specs on them, just a description they're suitable for cable tv and satellite tv applications. Should I even bother with those, or go straight for the proper stuff? My current splitters are up to 1000 MHz, so they will need to be swapped.
Could you please post a link or a photo of a 75 Ohm plug, so I can get an idea of what I should be looking for?

Thanks for all the help, once again!
 
the idea is to opt out of the current coax TV provider and convert the apartment's entire coax network to a MoCa 2.5 internal network, then completely disconnect the external feed as it will no longer be needed
Solid plan. Wholly isolated coax with connecting components upgraded to MoCA-optimized versions should get the job done.



Seems like you could just use another 3 GHz F-81 barrel connector in Room 2 (like at the outside junction) to streamline the connections.
 
Thanks for all your help guys, especially degrub :)
Will post an update once I setup the network, hopefully there will be no snags since from my understanding this use case is about as straightforward as it can be, with no complicators.
 
make sure the power supply adapters are universal on frequency and voltage as you may be using 220 V, 50Hz rather than the US 120V, 60 Hz power signal.
You will likely need at least a passive plug adapter
 
make sure the power supply adapters are universal on frequency and voltage as you may be using 220 V, 50Hz rather than the US 120V, 60 Hz power signal.
You will likely need at least a passive plug adapter

Yup, 240V 50Hz is indeed the grid here. From experience since a good chunk of years, supplied adapters with devices have all been universal with 100 - 250V 50/60Hz capabilities, but of course that should not be taken as a given.
Do you have any idea whether the supplied adapters with Actiontec (ScreenBeam) ECB6250 are universal voltage?
Plug adapters are very readily available here, so that will be of no issue.

Another question just popped up, I keep seeing F-81 connectors in US centric sites, but locally these barrel connectors are all F-6XX numbers, is there a difference between F-81 and F-6XX?
 
What is a real F-6xx part number ?

Search for the users of ScreenBeam on the forum and ping them if you cannot find online.
 
What is a real F-6xx part number ?

Search for the users of ScreenBeam on the forum and ping them if you cannot find online.
F-644 is very prevalent and pops up often, when searching for these connectors locally.

Downloaded the ECB6250 manuals, tech docs, etc. happy to find power supply is indicated as 100 - 240V :)
 
Started to piece together some hardware, but I am unable to find 1 in to 2 out MoCa 2.5 splitters in the EU. Can't find local sellers for the Holland stuff or anything mentioning MoCa 2.5 certification.
Will 5-2000 or 2450MHz sat tv splitters work, as those are readily available ?
The entire network, as it's being envisioned, will need only one 1 input 2 output splitter, all other connections will be simple barrel splice
 
maybe. all you can do is try. there is anecdotal evidence that some do and some cause issues.
Try US amazon and see what the cost is.
 

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