Two LANs with four MoCA

Vesics

New Around Here
Hi, two ECB7250 connecting two rooms work fine, LAN is 192.168.1.x; I want to use two more ECB7250, each pair connected via splitter, so two MoCA on a splitter in room A, and two MoCA on a splitter in room B.

BUT, each MoCA in room A is connected to a different LAN (192.168.1.x & 192.168.2.x), and MoCA in room B are feeding each one a different switch. In room B, some devices will be on 1.x (first switch) and some on 2.x (second switch). This setup is working erraticaly: sometimes on of the DHCP is giving IPs on the 1.x part, sometimes 2.x; forcing manual IPs isn't working. Some devices are Internet connected, some not.

So I was looking at a way to "separate" the two connections, with MoCA1 in room A communicating with MoCA1 in room B, but with a Netwok Security Setup (same PwD on both, in the D-Ext Band) switched ON on both MoCA1. The other two MoCA are NOT Security Enabled. The two MoCA1 with Security Enabled can't communicate, while the other two are OK. People at SceenBeam can't help me...

Any suggestion how to do it, if it's possible?

Thanks!
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
What other signals besides MoCA are present on the coax?

How much throughput are you seeking/needing for each MoCA link?
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
Isn’t this a very basic MoCA 2.x feature, at least for one way of accomplishing it — though with the very distasteful side effects of reduced bandwidth? (See section 2.1.1 of the MoCA 2.5 specs)
See below for a related older post; it applies to dual MoCA networks for WAN and LAN but the basics are the same.
dual WAN/LAN MoCA networks: MoCA allows for operating two separate MoCA networks within the MoCA Extended Band D frequency range; so you could establish a second MoCA network extending the router LAN over your coax. Drawbacks: Lower speeds, extra MoCA adapter required, and much configuration. The segmentation of the Extended Band D range, combined with lost spectrum required for signal separation, results in the two MoCA 2.5 networks having maximum throughput of 400 and 1200 Mbps:
* Network 1 (D-Low, 1125-1225 MHz): 400 Mbps max
* Network 2 (D-High, 1350-1675 MHz): 1200 Mbps shared max

So you'd need an additional MoCA "LAN" adapter at the router location, connected to the shared coax and a LAN port on the router, and then you'd need to manually configure all the MoCA adapters for their respective WAN or LAN MoCA network.

The additional cost, configuration hassles and reduced throughput make this a less than ideal solution.
 

Vesics

New Around Here
What other signals besides MoCA are present on the coax?

How much throughput are you seeking/needing for each MoCA link?
Hi, first of all, thank you for replying so quickly. I was hoping to have your comments :) . There is nothing else on the coax (No TV), just Ethernet. I need one link (from office room where the Bell router is, to the living room) to feed the PVR (Bell) by wire, because its WIFI reception is weak; and I want the PVR to be alone on his LAN (2.x). So I think 400Mbps is enough.
Still in the living room, the other MoCA is feeding a switch for the TV, AV receiver, Shield, a PC, and some other basic stuff (SmartThings,...), but from another router (in fact a firewall in the office room).

I examined the network design, and there seems to be a loop or a route problem when all the MoCA are connected. I have this (Office - living room):

Fiber -> Bell router (ethx in the 2.x range) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------> MoCA ->|splitter -> (Wall) -> splitter| -> MoCA -> Bell PVR (2.x range)
Bell router (ethy in the 2.x range) -> switch <- PC (VLAN1 2.x/eth1<-Firewall In - Firewall Out -> VLAN2 1.x/eth2) -> switch |----------> MoCA ->|splitter ------------- splitter| -> MoCA -> switch -> etc.


In this scenario, the Bell router has a DHCP (2.x) and the other router (1.x), but eveything get a 2.x IP. I can force a device manually on 1.x but then the gateway 1.x is not always responding. If I disconnect the MoCA feeded by the Bell router (and let the PVR connecting to Bell router in WIFI mode), everything is back to normal.

That's why I wanted to "separate" the two pair of MoCA, by encrypting comms on a pair. But when doing that, the two secured MoCA are not communicating.
 
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krkaufman

Very Senior Member
That's why I wanted to "separate" the two pair of MoCA, by encrypting comms on a pair. But when doing that, the two secured MoCA are not communicating.
Just setting privacy on one pair of adapters won’t get it done.

If I’m reading your posts correctly, it appears that you have one pair of adapters running with default settings … which would result in that pair using 5 bonded channels and consuming the whole of the MoCA spectrum, leaving no bandwidth for a second network. Running the second pair with privacy might be a necessity for the setup, I’m not sure, but it doesn’t resolve the shared spectrum issue.

One of my replies explains how to set up dual MoCA networks, at least the theory … sans instructions for how to configure each MoCA adapter. And another of the posts, above, hints at how you can have two MoCA 2.5 networks, with each having maximum throughput — if nothing else is on the coax to get in the way.

edit: The attached diagram floats an example dual MoCA network setup.
 

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krkaufman

Very Senior Member
PC (VLAN1 2.x/eth1<-Firewall In - Firewall Out -> VLAN2 1.x/eth2)
Couldn’t this whole thing be solved using VLANs over a single MoCA link? (Though the added hardware might put the price tag above the dual MoCA networks cost.)
 

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