Using Asus Router behind Provider Router

tokyo_networking

Regular Contributor
I am using an Asus router behind the router provided by the Internet provider. I don't like that router but unfortunately I have no choice. The below image works for me, but I would appreciate any feedback on the setup and whether there are any configuration on either router I should be concerned about or could improve on.

Asus Router behind Privider Router.png
 

Jaime Alvarez

Occasional Visitor
I would first try to configure the "provider router" in bridge mode. If you can't do it by yourself, try calling your ISP.
 

tokyo_networking

Regular Contributor
I would first try to configure the "provider router" in bridge mode. If you can't do it by yourself, try calling your ISP.

Do you mean WAN Bridge Mode like for example in the attached setup of a Huawei router? When seeing whether Asus supports something similar, I only came across Media Bridge Mode https://www.asus.com/support/FAQ/1043884 which seems to be something different.

If you are referring to bridging the WAN, should I assume that if the Asus router does not support the WAN protocol provided by the provider directly, it would not be able to support the WAN connection if the provider's router would be able to provide WAN Bridge mode?

Huawei WAN Bridge Mode.png
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture

tokyo_networking

Regular Contributor

That is where I got the above screenshot. I am between switching providers and both the provider routers are provided by the provider and neither provider provided router (Huawei HG8045Q and a carrier designed and manufactured router) has a WAN configuration page so I am unfortunately unable to put those routers in bridge mode. Even if I would be able to put them in bridge mode, the Asus router likely does not support the v6plus MAP-E protocol on the WAN side.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
Then contact the ISP and tell them to put it in bridge mode. If they can't / won't then use another provider.

What for? What isn't working in current double NAT?
 

tokyo_networking

Regular Contributor
Then contact the ISP and tell them to put it in bridge mode. If they can't / won't then use another provider.

When in doubt hack it! - https://github.com/meh301/HG8045Q
Thanks for sharing the link. Very interesting to read. The provider Nuro and the Huawei described is exactly what I am using currently and moving away from. Unfortunately, the password hack described does not work. Likely, Sony has changed the id / password since the article was written.
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
I was wondering whether there were any concerns or improvements

No concerns and you'll get no improvements with modem in bridge mode. If you close the DMZ and forward the ports you need only, you can get better protection as well - your devices are behind two firewalls. You can even use ISP modem/router's Wi-Fi for IoT or Guest Network, if you like. Whatever connects there has no access to your main network. Most people look for bridge mode because one router is a bit easier to configure. You have configured your routers already and you perhaps know what to do. No need of extra headache changing ISP's or using some tricks on the modem.
 
Last edited:

drinkingbird

Senior Member
If you have to use their router either way, why not set the Asus up as an AP, that way you eliminate the double NAT, routing etc.

These days, double NAT isn't usually an issue but it can be a pain if you want to set up incoming connections/port forwarding etc, and it is extra processing for no benefit really.
 

tokyo_networking

Regular Contributor
No concerns and you'll get no improvements with modem in bridge mode. If you close the DMZ and forward the ports you need only, you can get better protection as well - your devices are behind two firewalls. You can even use ISP modem/router's Wi-Fi for IoT or Guest Network, if you like. Whatever connects there has no access to your main network. Most people look for bridge mode because one router is a bit easier to configure. You have configured your routers already and you perhaps know what to do. No need of extra headache changing ISP's or using some tricks on the modem.
Thanks for the suggestions. These do make a lot of sense !
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
These do make a lot of sense !

One more benefit is the fact your ISP can't blame you about inconsistent service, if it happens. It's the equipment they have provided to you and if it isn't working properly they have to fix it for you. The ISP may also update the firmware remotely to keep the modem/router updated.
 

Jaime Alvarez

Occasional Visitor
No concerns and you'll get no improvements with modem in bridge mode. If you close the DMZ and forward the ports you need only, you can get better protection as well - your devices are behind two firewalls. You can even use ISP modem/router's Wi-Fi for IoT or Guest Network, if you like. Whatever connects there has no access to your main network. Most people look for bridge mode because one router is a bit easier to configure. You have configured your routers already and you perhaps know what to do. No need of extra headache changing ISP's or using some tricks on the modem.
Good points indeed @Tech9. The only thing that makes me recommend the bridge mode is my own anecdotal experience of having fewer internet service disruptions than my neighbors, in several places with different ISPs. I don't have a formal record that demonstrates this, but even my wife (not a techie person at all) noticed that in many ocassions, while people near us where complaining about their internet connection, we didn't have any issues.

There may be many explanations for this situation, of course, many of them not related to bridge mode. For example, just configuring different DNS providers helps when the ones from your ISP don't work properly. So here comes a question: Are there any specific advantages for the stability and quality of your internet connection that come directly from putting the ISP device in bridge mode and having you own (in this case ASUS) router do all the work? I imagine that in the ASUS routers some of the components and their tolerances are of a better quality than the ones that come in the ISP-supplied device. Could that help to have more robust signal processing? I'm just speculating here, but it is something I'm really curious about.

Cheers
 

Tech9

Part of the Furniture
while people near us where complaining about their internet connection

Most often the complaints are ISP device built-in Wi-Fi related, it's usually weaker.

I imagine that in the ASUS routers some of the components and their tolerances are of a better quality

ISP provided equipment is tested and verified by your ISP. Your own equipment is not. Asus home routers are consumer electronics like all others, built good enough to last for few years. If there is a heatsink with less metal or a component with $0.01 lower price available - it's used. Older electronics were built better and used to last longer. All newer are disposable with planned obsolescence as part of the engineering process.
 

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