Wanted some insight, to see if this setup would work!

TheeAngel

New Around Here
So, I currently have 2 routers. One is a Linksys and the other is an ASUS, I don't think models really make a difference in the scenario. Basically, I want to separate these routers entirely, but I want them to run off the same connection, with different IP's and devices connected would be separate.

I was wondering if I could run a switch off the modem and plug in both routers, giving them their own IP's. This way, devices connected to one router, would not show up as devices on the other, like if you were piggy backing them like normal and setting the 2nd router up as an access point.

The whole reason behind this is the number of devices connected throughout my living space, with around 20 devices connected. This would split them in half, making less work for each router and less latency while gaming. Would this work, or would I have issues?
 

ColinTaylor

Part of the Furniture
I was wondering if I could run a switch off the modem and plug in both routers, giving them their own IP's. This way, devices connected to one router, would not show up as devices on the other, like if you were piggy backing them like normal and setting the 2nd router up as an access point.
No this won't work. You can only connect a single device to the modem. It is not possible to "split" that connection.
 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
This is possible if you buy 5 static IPs. It is different on setup based on ISP. AT&T is different in the way it is handled than Comcast. In the past they were called business modems. Check with your ISP. There are also routers which were called business routers that can assign all 5 IP addresses. It is going to cost you more money per month.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Some ISP's used to give two IP's and @TheeAngel could use a switch to access that for two routers.

It is easy to test if your ISP does that, but everything I've tested in the past tw0 years this seems to have changed.

Paying for an additional IP (static or not) is the only option for two, totally separate networks, each with their own routers.

Of course, this also depends on the ISP connection and speed @TheeAngel has. If it is not a low latency connection (Fibre being preferred), even two IP's won't help for latency in each separate network.
 

TheeAngel

New Around Here
Ok, so let me ask you this then, showing my current configuration.


Router A (ASUS/Main) Router B (Netgear)


Modem>Router A>Router B


The devices connected to Router B are still showing up in the device list of Router A.


How do I separate these two, so that Router B devices will not show up in Router A?
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Ok, so let me ask you this then, showing my current configuration.


Router A (ASUS/Main) Router B (Netgear)


Modem>Router A>Router B


The devices connected to Router B are still showing up in the device list of Router A.


How do I separate these two, so that Router B devices will not show up in Router A?
They need to be both set up as wireless routers.

Then, plug an Ethernet cable from the Asus' LAN port to the WAN port of the Netgear. :)
 

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