Why do I need to sell my soul to boot the kids off the internet at bedtime?

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timevacuum

Occasional Visitor
Okay, maybe that was a bit of a mellow dramatic subject line but why do I need to give up my privacy just to enable internet scheduling on ASUS-Merlin?

I was going to enable internet scheduling on my AC68U for the kids iPhones when I got the message about giving ASUS/Trend permission to look at pretty much all my traffic. Why do they need this? I realize this would be needed for some of the other AIProtection features but I cannot fathom why they would need it for scheduling?

As I'm using Merlin's firmware, I'd like to request a scheduling feature without the privacy invasion but I realize that this would be a bit too much of a request given the stock firmware has scheduling already.

Could scheduling be coded out of the AIProtection suite?

Does anyone else share my perspective?

What other options have other folks used to avoid the stall tactics from the kids at bedtime?
 

Kingp1n

Very Senior Member
I dont use iPhones but Android phones and I'm using the Family link app which I allow for my kids to use their phone for an hour each day (customizable)....after their use, the phone locks. After 8pm the phone automatically locks until the next day. You can customize however you wish. It's a great app and you can unlock \lock anytime you want. Good luck .
 

HuskyHerder

Senior Member
As a side thought considering I have been there.

I have moved all my tinkering with the kids connections to the screen time feature. I have each kid setup for a certain down time , app limits etc. It can block account and passcode changes etc. requests for extra time are handled by push notifications which you can approve or disapprove. I hate to sound like a salesman, but it's made my life easier.

That however was not the answer to your question and I was just giving the old one parent to another answer.

PS. I am excited to see how Apple improves on it this year.

PPS. It's also remote manageable, so if a teen is out and needs more time to get home or at a friends house for example. I can modify the limitations from my house.
 
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Paliv

Regular Contributor
It's one single lab that got hacked, and so far the information as to the extent of that hack is conflicting, so I would call it "big time"...
That’s their official story, but the “investigators” have some very different information they are giving to the media. Hard to know who to trust. Trend has to CYA in this situation.

Edit: Though I will say we have to wait. Hoping Trend is telling the truth.

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/ne...eal-the-hacked-antivirus-vendors-avs-respond/
 

Paliv

Regular Contributor
I appreciate the parent tips on SNB. My son is too young and my daughter is on the way, but I’m planning out how to keep things somewhat under control. Especially when they’re young.
 

wiz

Regular Contributor
when my kids were that age I was using a wl500g router. I had a scheduled task that half an hour before bed time ip tables blocked traffic from the mac address of the phone and pc, and another one to unblock it half an hour before they had to get to school. No need to sell your soul if you want to block internet access from devices at certain times .

Worked like a charm..
 

Martineau

Part of the Furniture
Okay, maybe that was a bit of a mellow dramatic subject line but why do I need to give up my privacy just to enable internet scheduling on ASUS-Merlin?

What other options have other folks used to avoid the stall tactics from the kids at bedtime?
Not sure if Block WiFi Client WAN/LAN access would be of any use?

upload_2019-5-15_12-52-33.png


I never got around to implementing MAC blocking (it's easy to spoof a MAC anyway) and the script isn't fool-proof (nor very pretty coding), but it was enough to cause frustration!.:)

i.e. rather than use cru/cron to schedule the script to apply/remove the WAN BLOCK at predictable times, it was much more fun/effective to BLOCK their devices from accessing the WAN for a random number of secs say up to 5 minutes; then remove the WAN BLOCK for a very brief random period of up to say 30 secs (so surely there can't be a permanent BLOCK :cool:), then repeat! :p

Now this would give the illusion that the 'stuttering' connection was caused by the Internet, (or possibly a tablet issue) and usually they would give up when you could prove that (even if they were sitting next to you experiencing the 'stuttering') all other WiFi devices were working fine, so it must be something on their device! ;)

Let me know if you feel this something you wish to try.
 
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Paliv

Regular Contributor
Not sure if Block WiFi access would be of any use?

View attachment 17648

I never got around to implementing MAC blocking (it's easy to spoof a MAC anyway) and the script isn't fool-proof (nor very pretty coding), but it was enough to cause frustration!.:)

i.e. rather than use cru/cron to schedule the script to apply/remove the WAN BLOCK at predictable times, it was much more fun/effective to BLOCK their devices from accessing the WAN for a random number of secs say up to 5 minutes; then remove the WAN BLOCK for a very brief random period of up to say 30 secs (so surely there can't be a permanent BLOCK :cool:), then repeat! :p

Now this would give the illusion that the 'stuttering' connection was caused by the Internet, (or possibly a tablet issue) and usually they would give up when you could prove that (even if they were sitting next to you experiencing the 'stuttering') all other WiFi devices were working fine, so it must be something on their device! ;)

Let me know if you feel this something you wish to try.
This is something my dad would have done if WiFi existed when I was growing up.:p
 

Wisiwyg

Regular Contributor
This is something my dad would have done if WiFi existed when I was growing up.:p
Good for your Dad! #parenting
 

jtp10181

Regular Contributor
Thumbs up on the apple screen time suggestion. They finally added it so I can configure it by day (less limited on weekends). I used to use the WiFi blocking but I found the phone can't do thier iCloud backup at night then. The screen time is great because it blocks apps but the phone is still online. Also works away from home. I do use the blocking for other devices besides the phones.

Nothing motivates a 10 year old like when I set all apps to a 1 minute time limit so she will do chores.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Zirescu

Very Senior Member
Could setup their devices to only connect to the one radio and then use the radio schedule to block their access.
 

timevacuum

Occasional Visitor
I setup apple screen time in the end as it gives some granularity to the access they have. My one frustration is that I want to leave the iMessage app unblocked so that they always have a way to communicate as long as they have wifi but the kids have figured out how to play games on this platform. I guess you just can't everything you want.

Thanks for all the other suggestions. I do like to fiendish idea of blocking at random times for a random amount of time. Just allow them to get frustrated and naturally put the device down.
 

slinkoff

New Around Here
Time Scheduling works without accepting the EULA. Only the Web & Apps Filters requires it. Time Scheduling is enough for me. I use screentime on iOS devices like everyone else, but I use scheduling for the Fire stick in the kids' snug and also for myself blocking my own devices and TV at 10pm so I actually get some sleep. I have no self-discipline.
 

coxhaus

Part of the Furniture
It looks like you could create an ACL, access control list to block the kid's MAC or IP at night on a Cisco RV340 router. This would stop internet access. This is a wired only router so you would need an wireless AP something like a Cisco WAP571 AP or a WAP581 AP to go along with the router.

If you want more granularity then you can allow certain protocols out during what ever time you have set.
 

Greg72

Senior Member
My father would not touch the router or fool around with scripts. He would just beat me if I did not go to bed when instructed.
Same as my father. We had a H-89 and he actually took the cable that connected both boards. Also was known to pull the cards out of the Bell 300 baud modem that we used with that computer. They were built as a tank (both). You could beat that modem with a hammer and it would still work.
 

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