Wireless Wifi to metal building

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Sidefx

New Around Here
I am currently receiving Wifi in a metal building wirelessly. I have mounted an antenna on the metal building pointing it in the direction of my Netgear router which is in the main bedroom of the house. I unscrewed and removed one antenna from a Tp-Link wireless N access point device and connected the outdoor antenna wire. The Tp-Link is configured as a universal repeater. Wifi is slow and will occasionally drop out which requires a reboot of the TP-Link access point to bring it back. But it does work so I know it can be done.... I am wanting to replace the TP-Link to a more current version of repeater. I have read the Asus AC68U has removable antennas and can be configured in bridge mode to the main router and wifi will work this way.. Do you think the AC68U would be the device I need for my metal building setup? Thanks... PS- There is no way to run a wire from my main router to the metal building as it is all concrete. This has to be done wirelessly..
 

eibgrad

Very Senior Member
You sound like a potential candidate for a PTP (point-to-point) wireless bridge. The problem w/ your typical wireless router is that most of the signal is wasted given it uses an omni-directional antenna. In contrast, the PTP wireless bridge focuses all the signal directly between the endpoints, providing better signal and greater range. Of course, no matter the approach, not having clear LOS (line of sight) can be problematic.

What's the distance between the house and metal building?
 

Sidefx

New Around Here
You sound like a potential candidate for a PTP (point-to-point) wireless bridge. The problem w/ your typical wireless router is that most of the signal is wasted given it uses an omni-directional antenna. In contrast, the PTP wireless bridge focuses all the signal directly between the endpoints, providing better signal and greater range. Of course, no matter the approach, not having clear LOS (line of sight) can be problematic.

What's the distance between the house and metal building?
From the metal building to the router in the house is approximately 60 feet. Los signal goes thru 3 walls and a side by side frig in the kitchen. Lol
 

eibgrad

Very Senior Member
Do the house and metal building share the same electrical circuit? If so, powerline bridging might be an option. Powerline can be mighty impressive if you have good AC wiring, minimal electrical noise, etc.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
I unscrewed and removed one antenna from a Tp-Link wireless N access point device and connected the outdoor antenna wire.
As you found, that will not work reliably, if at all. First you will have significant signal loss in the cable (how long is it anyway?). Second, since one antenna is essentially not receiving a signal, the router will make bad decisions about rate selection and select a higher rate, which will be less reliable. This is because the AP thinks it has two transmit/receive chains, but with the setup you have, it really has only one.

As @eibgrad suggested, use a pair of point-to-point bridges. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=wireless+bridge
 

eibgrad

Very Senior Member
MoCA may be another option too, but I'm assuming it's less likely you have coax in the metal building.
 
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Sidefx

New Around Here
As you found, that will not work reliably, if at all. First you will have significant signal loss in the cable (how long is it anyway?). Second, since one antenna is essentially not receiving a signal, the router will make bad decisions about rate selection and select a higher rate, which will be less reliable. This is because the AP thinks it has two transmit/receive chains, but with the setup you have, it really has only one.

As @eibgrad suggested, use a pair of point-to-point bridges. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=wireless+bridge
The antenna cable is 10 feet long..
 

Sidefx

New Around Here
MoCA may be another option too, but I'm assuming it's less likely you have coax in the metal building.
Nope no coax.. And someone mentioned using the electrical wire.. The metal building is being fed from the main house panel to another breaker panel in the building. Each on their own separate ground.. I don't think I want to go down that rabbit hole.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
Nope no coax.. And someone mentioned using the electrical wire.. The metal building is being fed from the main house panel to another breaker panel in the building. Each on their own separate ground.. I don't think I want to go down that rabbit hole.
The ground connection doesn't matter, not does a separate breaker panel. You don't want a transformer between them. Powerline could work.
 

noah way

Regular Contributor
I'm running 2-AC68Us in buildings 150' apart with dual band hi-gain antennas (1 on each router) at >400 Mbps. The antennas are from https://www.data-alliance.net/, they have a great selection quality stuff. I'm running the indoor version, but they have a weatherproof one for all of $20.

I went with the 68U specifically because the antennas are replacable.

Just checked the signal, running between 468/526 Mbps.
 
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