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I think I need a bridge...

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yoodle

New Around Here
I'm trying to connect two offices in an old wood building without running an ethernet cable between them. I'm assuming what I need is a bridge?

The second office is 30 feet from where I could put one wireless device in the first office. We have no other wireless gear (except a microwave oven) and my computer doesn't detect any other wireless networks around either. There will be perhaps as many as 4 people in the second office, and I want them to transparently share the same LAN as in the first office. In order to avoid pulling any wires, we'll have to have VoIP access between offices as well; I've got the phone technology for that, so long as we have a suitable underlying network.

Does anybody have a suggestion on how I should try to do this? I'm thinking either a pair of WNHDE111 from Netgear or a pair of D-Link DAP-1522 devices, although I don't see any of the D-Links at the local Canadian stores so maybe they aren't approved for sale in Canada yet.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 
Yes, you could use a wireless bridge. 5GHz would be better than 2.4 due to the microwave oven. But 5GHz range will be less than 2.4GHz.

The DAP-1522 would be better than the WNHDE111 because it's dual band, which would let you try both bands. But on the downside, I found its 2.4GHz operation to be flaky.
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/30455/96/1/2/

You could also use powerline as an alternative. Use two of the same make and model devices that say "200 Mbps" somewhere on the box.
 
There will be perhaps as many as 4 people in the second office, and I want them to transparently share the same LAN as in the first office. In order to avoid pulling any wires, we'll have to have VoIP access between offices as well; I've got the phone technology for that, so long as we have a suitable underlying network.

Hopefully nobody is going to be using the phone much. I've done almost this exact setup for a past client (albeit in a metal building, no wood) because they were ardently opposed to running wire. Basically, it never worked terribly well, and it really showed in the VOIP calls. It was a fairly internet heavy office, so there weren't too many days that went by where there wasn't complaining of some type. We tried both G and A with various antennas. After further expansion of the office into another part of the building, we just said 'screw it' and ran a pair of Cat5 cables.

You could do this, but definately stick to 5GHz if you can (A or N) like Tim says. From past experiences like these, I'm a big advocate of calling an electrician and having them run some wires, but that's just me. It rarely ends up being terribly expensive (most electricians will charge about $80-$120/drop). Again, I'm biased. Stick to 5GHz and you might have some better results. This was a couple years ago and wireless gear has come a ways (N wasn't around when we were doing this), so hopefully you have better luck.
 
Scotty, that's definitely good advice, especially due to VoIP.

The auto-QoS on the Netgear bridge might help with outgoing voice. But the D-Link bridge doesn't have QoS at all, if I remember correctly.
 
Thanks everyone. I'll definitely try to run a cable, but it is good to know I have a backup option if I'm unable to get it through. (This is one strange old building...)
 
One of the smartest things I did in my IT consulting days was getting to know good electricians. It never ceases to amaze me how much fear there is surrounding running a few cat5's.

In your case since there's VOIP involved, I would be very cautious about using wireless. Voice is one of those things that you'll notice any problem almost immediately and consistently. Even a little tiny bit of echo, jitter, or scratching drives people up the wall. One small blip in connectivity and your calls get pooched. Not good.
 

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