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I've stopped IGMP, LLDP, but there is a final multicast medium by the router, via a UDP packet, any idea how to stop that?

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jonnyc55

Occasional Visitor
I've gone on a sterilisation of unnecessary things and that is multicast, as I don't ever plan to use it, it also looks nice on my Wireshark logs seeing all the IGMP, LLDP (and spanning tree protocol) spam gone. My computer looks almost deserted on the network sides with no web browser up (I've tweaked windows OS things too), which is great, except the router still manages to ping out another multicast medium, using UDP, with the destination as 192.168.50.255.

I have so far got these commands in place to stop IGMP and LLPD:

killall mcpd
service stop_amas_lldpd

I also have UPNP disabled.

I have multicast routing disabled under IPTV also, just to make sure.

Any ideas what can be done to stop this constant UDP multicast packet broadcast? Hopefully there is one more safe command to be had to stop it.

Thanks.
 
except the router still manages to ping out another multicast medium, using UDP, with the destination as 192.168.50.255.

IP address means nothing - what port do you see the traffic on...

More curiously, why are you bent on breaking your network?
 
IP address means nothing - what port do you see the traffic on...
The IP address seems to mean something when I read what this guy said (it's why I brought it up):
That's the universal broadcast address. It is designated as such because it's the 'last' address. An alternate version is created for every subnet as well, being the last available address in each subnet, so something like 192.168.1.255. Everything will pick it up that's on the same broadcast domain.
And that's why I put it there, it has some technical clue to it.

The source port is 35556 and the destination port is 7788 for these UDP packets.

More curiously, why are you bent on breaking your network?

Rather than trying to make me look a tit, give your reasoning and we'll see if that's applicable or not. If these protocols are to do with multicast applications such as file sharing/screen sharing only, then I don't need them. It's only a basic little home network, I'm willing to try things and I can simply revert these changes if need be, the threads that gave these commands saw no immediate consequences.

Let's say it only breaks things I don't need, well, I do it because no one really knows the effects of these 3 broadcasts on hardware/firmware/software interactions in the entire chain of the network and how it relates to performance, so simply, if it is not needed, then I'll turn it off to reduce those unknowns.
 
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