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Soldering an antenna

Discussion in 'General Wireless Discussion' started by LRWIFI, Apr 10, 2020.

  1. LRWIFI

    LRWIFI Occasional Visitor

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    So both sets of antenna (2 on 2. 4ghz and 2 on 5ghz) communicate with both the router at the house AND devices connected to the network? It's not 2 antennas dedicated for the devices to work from and 2 for communications to the router??
     
  2. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    Correct. As @coolbeans2016 alluded to, that device is really nothing more than a wireless router on a pole. EDIT: I think you can choose which band you want to be the repeater and then the other one is just a standard access point.

    No.
     
  3. LRWIFI

    LRWIFI Occasional Visitor

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    Oh wow. That's a hodgepodge of RF signals. So, it'd behoove me to just get a single frequency extender like the cc crane or similar. Is there one thats higher performance that I can move the antennas around with?

    I was hoping for a higher performance unit, but it makes that it's a tall order. Ham is much easier, signal wise.
     
  4. LRWIFI

    LRWIFI Occasional Visitor

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    Ok, so each antenna on a set of 4 or 6 communicates both with the computer on the network AND the the router. Thats a bummer...
     
  5. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    Remember that WiFi communication is inherently bidirectional. Not only do you have to transmit to the remote station but you must be able to receive their transmission. But antenna gain works for both transmission and reception.

    A regular WiFi extender/repeater is designed to sit half way between the source WiFi router and the furthest away client device. "Bridging the gap" as it were.

    This I think is where the Crane device would have an advantage. It is effectively two separate devices. One device sits outside the building and has a high gain directional antenna pointed at the remote location. The traffic to/from this antenna is fed inside the building into some sort of more traditional WiFi router or AP that has its own standard gain omni-directional antenna which covers the inside of the building.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2020