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Testing Cat6 in the new home network

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Avery

Regular Contributor
I will be pulling Cat6 (Belden 2412) throughout my home in the coming month or so. Can anyone provide me some guidance (or point to references) that outline how it should be tested to identify any performance or install issues before walls are closed up?

If there is any 'affordable' test equipment available, it would be good to hear about that, too.
 
A simple cable tester, they come as cheap as 10€ (testing just connectivity) or more € but with more options...
 
A simple cable tester, they come as cheap as 10€ (testing just connectivity) or more € but with more options...

Thanks. I'm not looking for a simple cable continuity tester that verifies the jack wiring, rather something that tests the condition of the cat6, itself, to verify any installation/nail/manufacturing/bandwidth issues. I see some references to these types of testers being about $1000 10-12 years ago, and am wondering if there is something more affordable available these days that would cover most of that?
 
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Search Amazon for the Noyafa NF-8209. While it doesn't carry the same presige as a Fluke it has proved rather handy, and surprisingly accurate.
 
I will be pulling Cat6 (Belden 2412) throughout my home in the coming month or so. Can anyone provide me some guidance (or point to references) that outline how it should be tested to identify any performance or install issues before walls are closed up?

If there is any 'affordable' test equipment available, it would be good to hear about that, too.
The cable will need to be terminated at both ends before you can test. If not terminated then check for sharp bends, damage to the jacket and staples or other retention devices that are to tight.

When terminated first test using a simple continuity tester that will check continuity and correct pining. Then connect a device such as a switch or router to one end of the cable and another device to the other end of the cable. If the cable is OK the indicator lights next to the port at both end of the cable should light up as gigabit.

If you want more complete testing you probably will need to hire a network specialist to certify each run using their expensive test equipment. This is probably worthwhile if you want and need multiple gig speed on your LAN.
 
The cable will need to be terminated at both ends before you can test. If not terminated then check for sharp bends, damage to the jacket and staples or other retention devices that are to tight.

When terminated first test using a simple continuity tester that will check continuity and correct pining. Then connect a device such as a switch or router to one end of the cable and another device to the other end of the cable. If the cable is OK the indicator lights next to the port at both end of the cable should light up as gigabit.

If you want more complete testing you probably will need to hire a network specialist to certify each run using their expensive test equipment. This is probably worthwhile if you want and need multiple gig speed on your LAN.
Thanks for the recommendations there. I wasn't sure if there were tests commonly performed, such as insulation testing/meggering which can be done with electrical conductors, which would not require termination.

Perhaps someone will know about some specific test equipment, or if it can be rented.
 
For home use as Ripshod said, more than This or This is futile. And like said CaptainSTX then just hire someone to do it for you is far les expensive..
 
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Search Amazon for the Noyafa NF-8209. While it doesn't carry the same presige as a Fluke it has proved rather handy, and surprisingly accurate.
Thanks - I will have a look at it. I didn't see this post earlier.
 
For home use as Ripshod said, more than This or This is futile. And like said CaptainSTX then just hire someone to do it for you is far les expensive..
Thanks. Any idea what it tends to run per visit for 30 cables tested? My remodel is in phases, so I'd be having someone out multiple times. Also, what testing is it that they usually perform to confirm bandwidth?
 
No idea, I do it myself, and prices are cheap in Serbia for it so hardly a comparison...
Mostly same as the device does, connectivity, signal strength (in voltage, frequency, RFI...). Nothing that special.
 
unless you ran the cables in conduit, get the runs certified before you close up the walls in case you have to replace a cable.
negotiate with the tester for multiple visits. should be travel tim plus testing fee and any repair cost
 
will be pulling Cat6 (Belden 2412)

Great cable!

May I recommend you use the Belden Cat6+ Keystone jacks at your end points:




Note that KEYconnect jacks are terminated with a punch down tool (I use Klein's)


REVconnect jacks use a termination tool that costs about $100 but gives great results.




Best & Easiest Way to Terminate Ethernet Cable
The Belden REVConnect Termination Tool makes terminating Ethernet cable extremely fast and easy. You just run each twisted pair through their respective Cable Manger channel, put the white conductor on the outside, slide on the Termination Cap, compress with this Termination Tool, and snap on the UTP Jack Interface. No individual punch downs are required, like the KEYConnect, which can lead to broken jacks or poor connections. I highly recommend REVConnect.


I had good service ordering from Falcontech.

There are cheaper keystones, like Monoprice which are OK, and others from Amazon, OK

I did do some color coding, using different color keystones (blue, gray, white, black, yellow, orange, etc).

When you use the Belden keystones you can see how they are designed to prevent crosstalk/interference/other issues by keeping the internal cable wires twisted and guiding them into their terminators.

Another good looking keystone that I did not use (needed smaller keystones because of some thin walls) is Hubbell



Was a bit too long for where I needed to put them.

But Avery, using the Belden keystones, odds are your cables are all going to check out fine from the get go.

Good luck have fun!
 

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Thanks - I think RevConnect is what I had ordered when I bought the cable. Seemed like a good investment for the simplification.
 
Stay with one standard on the TR45 jacks...
 

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