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Unmanaged Switch - IP Address (basic) question

Discussion in 'Switches, NICs and cabling' started by Mark070, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. Mark070

    Mark070 Occasional Visitor

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    Hi folks,

    I have a Netgear GS308 v3 (8 port) unmanaged switch. When I purchased my Edge Router 4, I had assigned reserved addresses for the major pieces of the network (NAS, Access Point, etc).

    For now, I have the switch just hooked up and it all works, but .. is it possible for me to assign the switch an IP Address (dhcp reserved)? I read that unmanaged switches do not have mac addresses; so how would I know which device is my switch on the network?

    Sorry, n00b question - and it really does not matter, but .. 1.) Its fun and 2.) I enjoy the learning aspect

    EDIT: ok .. so dumb switches (unmanaged) do not have MAC address' or IP Address', they switch on a ethernet level. Ok, answered. Thanks!

    EDIT 2: /delete thread
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2019
  2. coxhaus

    coxhaus Part of the Furniture

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    Look at you DHCP assigned pool of IP addresses. Do you have a MAC you don't recognize that might be you switch's IP, if not then probably no.
     
  3. sfx2000

    sfx2000 Part of the Furniture

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    For an unmanaged switch, no need to reserve addresses - as mentioned, it's all at the ethernet level.

    For Layer2/Layer3 managed switches - I prefer to keep them outside of the DHCP scope period, and static assign them.

    Reason being - what happens if the DHCP server is down or goes sideways - having a true static IP address to get to the switch can save a lot of trouble.
     
  4. dosborne

    dosborne Very Senior Member

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    I do both, I setup the device with a static IP but I also put it into the DHCP reservation list. The odd time you reset to default a device, it typically goes back to DHCP. This way the same IP gets assigned :)
     
  5. unmesh

    unmesh Occasional Visitor

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    Doesn't this mean that the static IP address has to be within the DHCP scope? If so, do you let the DHCP server assign the address and then add it to the reservation list and to the device as its static address?
     
  6. ColinTaylor

    ColinTaylor Part of the Furniture

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    No, not on an Asus. The router (and dnsmasq) doesn't impose any restrictions on reservations other than it has to be within the same subnet as the pool. Just manually type in the client's MAC address.
     
    dosborne likes this.
  7. unmesh

    unmesh Occasional Visitor

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    Thanks! Adding this to my list of things to do :)
     
  8. coxhaus

    coxhaus Part of the Furniture

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    The IP address scope is based on the mask of the IP address not the DHCP scope. A mask of 255.255.255.0 means 256 IP addresses. You can't use them all as you have a network IP address and a broadcast IP address.
     
  9. unmesh

    unmesh Occasional Visitor

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    I knew that but was not sure of the relationship between the range of addresses in the DHCP scope and the ability to make a reservation.

    Maybe I still don't know it and only think I do :)