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ASUS RT-AC86U Antenna Boosters / External Antenna possible?

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IAmOrion

Occasional Visitor
Hi all,

Came across this forum whilst doing some research regarding my FTTP Sky Broadband. Long story short, the Sky Hub kept rebooting at random, customer service help was less than desirable, so I dug out my old ASUS RT-AC86U to give it a whirl. I found guides on here on how to set it working with FTTP and so far it's been working great - for the most part anyways.

Some background now, I've just moved into a rented, brand new build. I'm the first tenant. There's no landlines, it's direct FTTP only. Now, as wonderful as that is, the builders / architect / whoever clearly weren't very tech knowledgable!! Whilst they did install RJ45 sockets around the house using Cat 6 cabling, for some stupid reason they decided to a) have the FTTP enter the property into the under-stairs, small cupboard which also houses the immersion tank / heating stuff, right at the back. and b) have all the household sockets route back to the same place, next to the ONT. I honestly don't know what the hell they were thinking!! Literally THEE WORST possible place to be putting a WiFi router! The hottest little cupboard in the entire house that's also surrounded by metal, wiring, water piping and a WiFi (Samsung Joule) thing etc etc - you get the idea - absolutely stupid place for it!

But alas, I can't move it, nothing I can do and not feasible (nor plausible) to somehow extend the power, ONT and also ethernet cables anywhere else or even outside the cupboard. The ASUS router was reporting temps in the low 90. I found posts about using fans etc, and I am now at a decent 50-60 max. So that was one issue sorted, and this leads me to my question.... My WiFi devices are struggling to get a decent signal unless stood by the sodding cupboard!

Since I'm pretty poor, and can't afford to start building a fancy mesh network with multiple wifi routers / extenders etc, is there any thing anyone can recommend that I can use to perhaps boost the antenna signal? Or even use instead of the antennas that it comes with? Something like the attached picture for example (Which is intended for use with a dual wifi card in computer rather than a router) but for a router?

Many thanks in advance
 

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This router has 3x external antennas and 1x internal printed on a small PCB. You can replace the external antennas with higher gain ones, but you can't do anything with the internal one. This makes sense only if you need more range in horizontal plane - if your place is a single storey bungalow or an apartment. Good lick finding good quality high-gain antennas though. Almost everithing on Amazon and eBay is fake and worse than what the router came with. In general - not recommended. Use the cables available and move the router to more central location. Use Wi-Fi connections.
 
Hi all,

Came across this forum whilst doing some research regarding my FTTP Sky Broadband. Long story short, the Sky Hub kept rebooting at random, customer service help was less than desirable, so I dug out my old ASUS RT-AC86U to give it a whirl. I found guides on here on how to set it working with FTTP and so far it's been working great - for the most part anyways.

Some background now, I've just moved into a rented, brand new build. I'm the first tenant. There's no landlines, it's direct FTTP only. Now, as wonderful as that is, the builders / architect / whoever clearly weren't very tech knowledgable!! Whilst they did install RJ45 sockets around the house using Cat 6 cabling, for some stupid reason they decided to a) have the FTTP enter the property into the under-stairs, small cupboard which also houses the immersion tank / heating stuff, right at the back. and b) have all the household sockets route back to the same place, next to the ONT. I honestly don't know what the hell they were thinking!! Literally THEE WORST possible place to be putting a WiFi router! The hottest little cupboard in the entire house that's also surrounded by metal, wiring, water piping and a WiFi (Samsung Joule) thing etc etc - you get the idea - absolutely stupid place for it!

But alas, I can't move it, nothing I can do and not feasible (nor plausible) to somehow extend the power, ONT and also ethernet cables anywhere else or even outside the cupboard. The ASUS router was reporting temps in the low 90. I found posts about using fans etc, and I am now at a decent 50-60 max. So that was one issue sorted, and this leads me to my question.... My WiFi devices are struggling to get a decent signal unless stood by the sodding cupboard!

Since I'm pretty poor, and can't afford to start building a fancy mesh network with multiple wifi routers / extenders etc, is there any thing anyone can recommend that I can use to perhaps boost the antenna signal? Or even use instead of the antennas that it comes with? Something like the attached picture for example (Which is intended for use with a dual wifi card in computer rather than a router) but for a router?

Many thanks in advance

You'll probably cause more problems than you solve. Higher gain antennas will narrow the signal, and amplifiers amplify noise even more than signal.

Just use one of the ethernet runs to extend the ONT to some other room and plug that into the WAN of your asus. If you want wired LAN too that makes it a bit more complex, not sure if there is a spot where you can access two ethernets, one for WAN and one for LAN, then put a cheap switch in the cupboard to merge all the LAN together (leave the WAN separate).
 
This router has 3x external antennas and 1x internal printed on a small PCB. You can replace the external antennas with higher gain ones, but you can't do anything with the internal one. This makes sense only if you need more range in horizontal plane - if your place is a single storey bungalow or an apartment. Good lick finding good quality high-gain antennas though. Almost everithing on Amazon and eBay is fake and worse than what the router came with. In general - not recommended. Use the cables available and move the router to more central location. Use Wi-Fi connections.
Hi, Thanks for the reply - yeah, I'm getting that general impression about the antennas on eBay and Amazon (I should add, I'm in the UK for what it's worth)

I have a couple of systems (Gaming PC, TrueNAS, Plex, Homebridge) that all basically don't have WiFi Cards, they all use Ethernet (Whole diff topic as the why's etc). Plus, there is no "central" point! I'd had to drag power and cables across half the property to centralise it, so really not feasible. I'm in a 1 bed house, that has a Mezzanine, so it's "kind of" got a first floor, but think of it as a first floor corridor that only covers half the property. Hard to explain - but as it happens, all the WiFi devices ARE on the same ground floor as the router.

Maybe I do need to look for a second router ASUS that is compatible with my RT-AC86U to create a mesh with after all!
Would it have to be another RT-AC86U?
Would it still be one singular WiFi network (my 2.4/5ghz is combined) point?
 
You'll probably cause more problems than you solve. Higher gain antennas will narrow the signal, and amplifiers amplify noise even more than signal.

Just use one of the ethernet runs to extend the ONT to some other room and plug that into the WAN of your asus. If you want wired LAN too that makes it a bit more complex, not sure if there is a spot where you can access two ethernets, one for WAN and one for LAN, then put a cheap switch in the cupboard to merge all the LAN together (leave the WAN separate).
Unfortunately I *need* Wired LAN, and the stupid build design means it's just not possible to move the ONT. I mean, I could in theory route the ONT connection to one of the wall sockets, and connect the router there, but then there's no way to connect the other access points, no way to move them, and obv I don't want 5m cables running through the middle of my lounge/house! It's honestly such a dumb wiring setup! The builder or whoever put zero thought into actual usability!

Seems like ultimately a second mesh router my be the best route after all - wondering if I can find a suitable ASUS router on eBay second hand that would work.

My only mesh experience is really my parents EERO WiFi 6 mesh thing which has 3 EERO devices throughout the house, each one is an individual wifi access point so to speak, but, presumably because of how meshes work, they only show as 1 WiFi access point to my devices
 
Unfortunately I *need* Wired LAN, and the stupid build design means it's just not possible to move the ONT. I mean, I could in theory route the ONT connection to a one wall socket, and connect the router there, but then there's no way to connect the other access points, no way to move them, and obv I don't want 5m cables running through the middle of my lounge! It's honestly such a dumb wiring setup! The builder or whoever put zero thought into actual usability!

Seems like ultimately a second mesh router my be the best route after all - wondering if I can find a suitable ASUS router on eBay second hand that would work.

My only mesh experience is really my parents EERO WiFi 6 mesh thing which has 3 EERO devices throughout the house, each on is an individual wifi access point so to speak, but, presumably because of how meshes work, they only show as 1 WiFi access point to my devices

Any router will do (assuming it is capable of the wired throughput you need, wireless throughput doesn't matter), disable wifi and put it in the cabinet, WAN connected to ONT. Connect LAN ports to the runs to the rest of the apt, put your Asus in AP mode on any port you want around the house. Now the LAN on the Asus and all the other ports around the house will be on the LAN hardwired. If you want Guest wireless functionality, leave the asus in router mode, you'll have double NAT but no big deal (can even eliminate the NAT and use the NAT on the main router, just need a couple static routes).

If only I had a nickel for every time I've seen a new or renovated place wired stupidly, I'd be rich. I had a friend looking at one place that only had one coax outlet, in the living room. I was like what about bedrooms and stuff? They're like everything is wireless now. Ok guys.
 
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Any router will do (assuming it is capable of the wired throughput you need, wireless throughput doesn't matter), disable wifi and put it in the cabinet, WAN connected to ONT. Connect LAN ports to the runs to the rest of the apt, put your Asus in AP mode on any port you want around the house. Now the LAN on the Asus and all the other ports around the house will be on the LAN hardwired. If you want Guest wireless functionality, leave the asus in router mode, you'll have double NAT but no big deal (can even eliminate the NAT and use the NAT on the main router, just need a couple static routes).
omg I'm so dumb! I got so focused on potentially needing to mesh it, and forgot the most obvious approach of using one router as basically a LAN router, and then having WiFi router elsewhere!

Any recommendations for a good router with strong signal that's better than the RT-AC86U I'm using now? Should I stick with ASUS or is there better, newer routers I should be looking at? It looks like, as an example, any ASUS aimesh router would also work (whilst also creating a mesh) - I realise I'm potentially doing what I said I didn't want to do ha but I must admit, my parents EERO mesh worked amazingly! I can't afford the EERO WiFi 6 mesh malarky though
 
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omg I'm so dumb! I got so focused on potentially needing to mesh it, and forgot the most obvious approach of using one router as basically a LAN router, and then having WiFi router elsewhere!

Any recommendations for a good router with strong signal that's better than the RT-AC86U I'm using now? Should I stick with ASUS or is there better, newer routers I should be looking at? It looks like, as an example, any ASUS aimesh router would also work (whilst also creating a mesh) - I realise I'm potentially doing what I said I didn't want to do ha but I must admit, my parents EERO mesh worked amazingly! I can't afford the EERO WiFi 6 mesh malarky though

Does your ISP provide a router? If so you can just disable wifi and use that as your router and your Asus as an AP.

If there are runs of coax in the same places as the ethernet, you could use MOCA adapters to convert one to ethernet so you could run both LAN and WAN to the asus somewhere in the house (and have a cheap switch in the cabinet connecting the LANs together) - though that will likely cost more than a cheap used AC router.

Unless your place is very large or you have a ton of devices, there isn't any need for a mesh system. All those systems are is a few APs with hacks and tweaks to try and force clients to move around. They are never seamless and always have some glitches and issues, so if you don't have a need for it, no reason to take on that headache.

There is basically no reason to have wifi enabled at all on the one in the cabinet, it will just cause more heat and provide a barely usable signal that will just interfere with your useful signal.

TP link makes decent stuff, not as good as asus in my opinion but if just being used as a basic AP or router it should be fine and you can find new ones cheap and used ones even cheaper. Depending on the speed of your internet, just want to do some research and make sure it will be able to handle the throughput you need. But you should even be able to find used Asus AC routers relatively cheap. You probably want the better one (assuming two different models) as the base router and then the other as the AP, the router is the one that needs more horsepower.
 
Should I stick with ASUS

Your limited budget basically stops the conversation. I'm not familiar with your local market, but don't buy used AC86U off eBay. This model is the most unreliable Asus in recent years with many reported hardware and software issues. Used units may have defects. This house may have a nice installation for fiber, router and switch in this cabinet with wall plate APs in rooms, but this is out of question because of the cost and the fact you are renting.

If the place was yours and the budget allowed I would suggest SafeStream router (ER605 or ER7206), JetStream switch with PoE (TL-SG2008P or with more ports), OC200 Controller and a few PoE powered Wi-Fi 6 wall plate APs (EAP615). This is TP-Link Omada business networking series setup similar to Ubiquiti UniFi, but with better price/performance. It's much better than any home "mesh" systems on the market. An idea for when you get the money for it.
 
Does your ISP provide a router? If so you can just disable wifi and use that as your router and your Asus as an AP.

If there are runs of coax in the same places as the ethernet, you could use MOCA adapters to convert one to ethernet so you could run both LAN and WAN to the asus somewhere in the house (and have a cheap switch in the cabinet connecting the LANs together) - though that will likely cost more than a cheap used AC router.

Unless your place is very large or you have a ton of devices, there isn't any need for a mesh system. All those systems are is a few APs with hacks and tweaks to try and force clients to move around. They are never seamless and always have some glitches and issues, so if you don't have a need for it, no reason to take on that headache.

There is basically no reason to have wifi enabled at all on the one in the cabinet, it will just cause more heat and provide a barely usable signal that will just interfere with your useful signal.

TP link makes decent stuff, not as good as asus in my opinion but if just being used as a basic AP or router it should be fine and you can find new ones cheap and used ones even cheaper. Depending on the speed of your internet, just want to do some research and make sure it will be able to handle the throughput you need. But you should even be able to find used Asus AC routers relatively cheap. You probably want the better one (assuming two different models) as the base router and then the other as the AP, the router is the one that needs more horsepower.

Yes, they provided the Sky Hub *BUT* that keeps rebooting itself as mentioned in first post, and the customer service is rubbish, basically wanting me to disconnect all 3rd party devices for 2-3 weeks (since the reboot could happen anywhere from once a day, to once every 4 or 5 days) and blaming a device on my network for "causing the router to reboot" despite me having the same setup for about 7 years in my previous house without any issues! The only difference is that was a virgin router, and now it's a sky router. That's what took me down this path os switching it for the ASUS router, to eliminate the random router reboots (which it appears to have done!)

I'm on a 500Mbps tariff with my current speed being around 517Mbps whenever I remember to do a test. To be honest, with the exception of my Fire Stick 4K, all other WiFi stuff is basically IOT devices and Smart light switches etc so no need for the super fast AC2900 or whatever, I imagine AC1200 would be fine or AC1900 if I wanted to make sure the odd use of my laptop had fast wifi

And nope, no coax anywhere near the ONT etc. There's 3 coax sockets in the house, but I've yet to fathom the route they take. There's no coax going to the main ONT / RJ45 sockets though, so coax stuff is a no go.

My place is not large at all, it's about 66-70m2 from memory. They just wired everything into the worst possible place in the house! Stupid little cupboard like I say! There's also only 2 power sockets in it too - and they even messed that up because there's fixed shelves in this stupid cupboard, like, bolted to the surrounding walls and maybe even glued and can not be removed, and the shelf is directly under the only (2 gang) wall socket, touching the bottom of the socket plastic surround, meaning I can't even plug in an extension cable as the 3 core rated cable is too thick and can't bend 90degree flat ha! The only reason the router and ONT modem are ok, is because the wire from the plug comes out the front so speak rather than from below. Honestly boggles my mind how they messed this up so bad. The next closest power socket is about 6 meters away! So stupid!

Your limited budget basically stops the conversation. I'm not familiar with your local market, but don't buy used AC86U off eBay. This model is the most unreliable Asus in recent years with many reported hardware and software issues. Used units may have defects. This house may have a nice installation for fiber, router and switch in this cabinet with wall plate APs in rooms, but this is out of question because of the cost and the fact you are renting.

If the place was yours and the budget allowed I would suggest SafeStream router (ER605 or ER7206), JetStream switch with PoE (TL-SG2008P or with more ports), OC200 Controller and a few PoE powered Wi-Fi 6 wall plate APs (EAP615). This is TP-Link Omada business networking series setup similar to Ubiquiti UniFi, but with better price/performance. It's much better than any home "mesh" systems on the market. An idea for when you get the money for it.

Yeah, all of that's over my head ha - but yeah, being rented plus the fact it's literally brand new, I'm not even allowed to do anything really! Not even allowed 3M Command strips on the wall as an alternative to screws - everything and anything it seems is a no go :(
 
Yes, they provided the Sky Hub *BUT* that keeps rebooting itself as mentioned in first post, and the customer service is rubbish, basically wanting me to disconnect all 3rd party devices for 2-3 weeks (since the reboot could happen anywhere from once a day, to once every 4 or 5 days) and blaming a device on my network for "causing the router to reboot" despite me having the same setup for about 7 years in my previous house without any issues! The only difference is that was a virgin router, and now it's a sky router. That's what took me down this path os switching it for the ASUS router, to eliminate the random router reboots (which it appears to have done!)

I'm on a 500Mbps tariff with my current speed being around 517Mbps whenever I remember to do a test. To be honest, with the exception of my Fire Stick 4K, all other WiFi stuff is basically IOT devices and Smart light switches etc so no need for the super fast AC2900 or whatever, I imagine AC1200 would be fine or AC1900 if I wanted to make sure the odd use of my laptop had fast wifi

And nope, no coax anywhere near the ONT etc. There's 3 coax sockets in the house, but I've yet to fathom the route they take. There's no coax going to the main ONT / RJ45 sockets though, so coax stuff is a no go.

My place is not large at all, it's about 66-70m2 from memory. They just wired everything into the worst possible place in the house! Stupid little cupboard like I say! There's also only 2 power sockets in it too - and they even messed that up because there's fixed shelves in this stupid cupboard, like, bolted to the surrounding walls and maybe even glued and can not be removed, and the shelf is directly under the only (2 gang) wall socket, touching the bottom of the socket plastic surround, meaning I can't even plug in an extension cable as the 3 core rated cable is too thick and can't bend 90degree flat ha! The only reason the router and ONT modem are ok, is because the wire from the plug comes out the front so speak rather than from below. Honestly boggles my mind how they messed this up so bad. The next closest power socket is about 6 meters away! So stupid!



Yeah, all of that's over my head ha - but yeah, being rented plus the fact it's literally brand new, I'm not even allowed to do anything really! Not even allowed 3M Command strips on the wall as an alternative to screws - everything and anything it seems is a no go :(

Sorry forgot you mentioned that. Try disabling the wifi and aiming the fans at their device, it was probably overheating. If it is stable that way, use it as your router and your Asus as the AP and you're good to go (or if you want isolated guest wifi, leave the asus in router mode). Or if their device supports bridge mode just use your router as normal and bridge theirs, that may help it be more stable too. If it doesn't have enough LAN ports you can get a dumb gigabit switch for $20 to $30 here so I can't imagine it would be that different there, maybe 15 to 20 pounds?

Worst case go swap their hub - unless they make it harder in the UK than the US, here you can just walk in and swap it without issue. I work for BT so sky is the enemy anyway :D

No coax to the ONT makes no sense. If you wanted traditional TV it would need to go to the ONT. May be tucked behind one of the wall plates or something. You would need a tone generator and probe to try and trace it out if you cant find it anywhere.

Edit actually bridge mode won't work on their device as that would turn the LAN ports effectively into WAN ports which isn't what you want. So leave theirs in router mode and decide if you want yours as just an AP or a router with more features. If you want yours as a router, you can disable NAT on yours and add a couple static routes so you aren't in a double NAT (though it isn't a big deal to have double NAT typically).
 
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It doesn't matter where the ONT is , simply use a longer lead between ONT and your router.

Move the router out of the cupboard.
 
Sorry forgot you mentioned that. Try disabling the wifi and aiming the fans at their device, it was probably overheating. If it is stable that way, use it as your router and your Asus as the AP and you're good to go (or if you want isolated guest wifi, leave the asus in router mode). Or if their device supports bridge mode just use your router as normal and bridge theirs, that may help it be more stable too. If it doesn't have enough LAN ports you can get a dumb gigabit switch for $20 to $30 here so I can't imagine it would be that different there, maybe 15 to 20 pounds?

Worst case go swap their hub - unless they make it harder in the UK than the US, here you can just walk in and swap it without issue. I work for BT so sky is the enemy anyway :D

No coax to the ONT makes no sense. If you wanted traditional TV it would need to go to the ONT. May be tucked behind one of the wall plates or something. You would need a tone generator and probe to try and trace it out if you cant find it anywhere.

Edit actually bridge mode won't work on their device as that would turn the LAN ports effectively into WAN ports which isn't what you want. So leave theirs in router mode and decide if you want yours as just an AP or a router with more features. If you want yours as a router, you can disable NAT on yours and add a couple static routes so you aren't in a double NAT (though it isn't a big deal to have double NAT typically).
As far as I know, the coax is fed directly to the big aerial on my roof, it's nothing to do with the ONT and not even remotely close to it

Also, yeah, here in the UK it's different - there's no where to just walk into so far as I know. Not to mention, as I said, they won't swap the router until I've done my few weeks worth of absurd "testing" with no 3rd party devices connected! I already tried getting them to swap the router

It doesn't matter where the ONT is , simply use a longer lead between ONT and your router.

Move the router out of the cupboard.
Yeah, as mentioned, that's not possible. ALL the network points route back to the cupboard. There's 5 network points in total, ONE in each room / location, NO double sockets so I can't even send the WLAN out then LAN back in to a switch in cupboard. It's obviously not plausible to drag cables 5 - 10 meters through the house.
 
As far as I know, the coax is fed directly to the big aerial on my roof, it's nothing to do with the ONT and not even remotely close to it

Also, yeah, here in the UK it's different - there's no where to just walk into so far as I know. Not to mention, as I said, they won't swap the router until I've done my few weeks worth of absurd "testing" with no 3rd party devices connected! I already tried getting them to swap the router


Yeah, as mentioned, that's not possible. ALL the network points route back to the cupboard. There's 5 network points in total, ONE in each room / location, NO double sockets so I can't even send the WLAN out then LAN back in to a switch in cupboard. It's obviously not plausible to drag cables 5 - 10 meters through the house.

Try running their router with wifi disabled and the fans on it, with your Asus off the LAN. If it still crashes and reboots, set it aside, wait a couple weeks and tell them you did their testing and it still crashes and get it replaced. If you're paying for their router (you are one way or another) might as well use it. Or if you're paying a rental fee return it and use that money you're saving toward another router to use for that purpose.

So their router in cupboard (wifi disabled), wan to ont, LAN to one of the Ethernet runs, then wan of your Asus on the other end of that Ethernet run in the apartment.

So their troubleshooting is for you to not use internet for 3 weeks? Isn't every device a 3rd party device?
 
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As far as I know, the coax is fed directly to the big aerial on my roof, it's nothing to do with the ONT and not even remotely close to it

Also, yeah, here in the UK it's different - there's no where to just walk into so far as I know. Not to mention, as I said, they won't swap the router until I've done my few weeks worth of absurd "testing" with no 3rd party devices connected! I already tried getting them to swap the router


Yeah, as mentioned, that's not possible. ALL the network points route back to the cupboard. There's 5 network points in total, ONE in each room / location, NO double sockets so I can't even send the WLAN out then LAN back in to a switch in cupboard. It's obviously not plausible to drag cables 5 - 10 meters through the house.


Ribbon cable , flat flexible and easy to hide. I had to get through the house, the upper floor is rebar reinforced concrete and impossible to drill. I bought ribbon cable and passed it through the gaps for water pipes. It goes under carpet and you'd never know it was there.
 
Ribbon cable , flat flexible and easy to hide. I had to get through the house, the upper floor is rebar reinforced concrete and impossible to drill. I bought ribbon cable and passed it through the gaps for water pipes. It goes under carpet and you'd never know it was there.

Just so we're not going round in circles, there is no carpet to run cable under, there's no floor boards to go under, I'm in a rented brand new build where I'm not so much as even allowed to put a single screw into anything, let alone try and dig anything up. The floor I believe is concrete with a lining over the top that's glued down as well as sealed around all edges, hell, it literally covers the entire floor of the house as one giant sheet as if they built on top of it! it is impossible in my situation to be able to feed any wiring out of the cupboard in that way. Nothing can be moved, It's not feasible. It quite literally can not happen.
 
Try running their router with wifi disabled and the fans on it, with your Asus off the LAN. If it still crashes and reboots, set it aside, wait a couple weeks and tell them you did their testing and it still crashes and get it replaced. If you're paying for their router (you are one way or another) might as well use it. Or if you're paying a rental fee return it and use that money you're saving toward another router to use for that purpose.

So their router in cupboard (wifi disabled), wan to ont, LAN to one of the Ethernet runs, then wan of your Asus on the other end of that Ethernet run in the apartment.

So their troubleshooting is for you to not use internet for 3 weeks? Isn't every device a 3rd party device?

I'll give that a go perhaps. It's all part of the monthly payment I assume, every ISP here in the UK provides their own router as part of the contract you take out.
There's no separate rental or whatever. They say the router is "free" but we all know it's basically paid for as part of the monthly tariff ha.

So their troubleshooting is for you to not use internet for 3 weeks? Isn't every device a 3rd party device?

Exactly that!! I've already had angry emails and phone calls at just how absurd that is! I asked them - "How am I supposed to even monitor it rebooting if I've no device attached to know when the internet dies due to it rebooting!". I also pointed out I can't take 2-3 weeks off work (working from home) and not use internet. I got the response along the lines of "BT OpenReach won't even look into the issue if we haven't tested this first. From the line and router tests I can do here, it looks as though everything is functioning correctly so it must be a device on the network causing the router to reboot" ... blah blah blah.
 
Just so we're not going round in circles, there is no carpet to run cable under, there's no floor boards to go under, I'm in a rented brand new build where I'm not so much as even allowed to put a single screw into anything, let alone try and dig anything up. The floor I believe is concrete with a lining over the top that's glued down as well as sealed around all edges, hell, it literally covers the entire floor of the house as one giant sheet as if they built on top of it! it is impossible in my situation to be able to feed any wiring out of the cupboard in that way. Nothing can be moved, It's not feasible. It quite literally can not happen.

Sounds like you have a room at Wormwood Scrubs.
 

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