Best device to extend coverage with no line of sight? Something like a NLOS Nanostation?

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anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
After a lot of research here and other spots, I bought a Nanostation Loco m5 to extend the range of the wireless signal my best friend who lives in the apartment above me to my apartment, one floor down and just to the west (I am on a fixed income and he's generously agreed to share his bandwidth with me). Since we're in separate apartments MoCA is out (I checked the cable box), and it is an old house with no grounded wiring so power over ethernet is, too.

Configured the Nanostation Loco m5 as a wifi extender (like so). It works fine--in line of sight. I kind of decided to disregard the advice of Ubiquiti's techs regarding the necessity of having a clear LOS since I read so many reviews on Amazon that said it works fine without it. Would just try it out; if it didn't work, return it.

I'm not getting anything at all. Some might be because of native interference near the unit and not having tested out different positions, but I'm kind of at a loss since it is my friend's apartment and I need to preserve the router wifi capabilities as well (both because he needs them (wants dual band, naturally), and because I want to use the parental controls downstairs. So setting up static ips or otherwise overriding the router is out of the question (and my capabilities, honestly, are pretty limited). Just wanted to feed the signal through the Ubiquiti unit and get a great signal downstairs. Sadly, no. :(

So I guess I'm going to shop for a range extender/repeater/bridge. Or configure a router to work as such using alt firmware.

Does anyone have a rec for a really good range extender that will go through a wall, a staircase/floor, and at least one other wall? Big ask, I know, but I'm hoping there's something that will at least let me stream on my Roku and podcasts, get and maintain wifi on my Nexus 6 through Project Fi (wifi is pretty much a sine que non for their plans), and be able to access the net at a good speed? Not all at once, necessarily. Right now, the internet is usually fine, but streaming can be tough and I lose signal on my phone fairly frequently.

Any companies like Ubiquiti that make heavy-duty stuff marketed to the consumer at large, too, but designed for NLOS? Or ideas on a good range extender (pref dual band, but not a dealbreaker), or a good router I can use as a repeater/range extender?

The router we're using as the AP is the RT-AC56U, running ASUS Merlin, HGG's supercharged version (380.59.1 final). That particular piece of the puzzle has helped incredibly, btw.

I'm thinking another ASUS model would be best if getting another router is better than a range extender or other product like a NLOS Nanostation (which would be a dream).

Just to make things more difficult, my budget's under $150. Way under it, if possible.

Thank you for your help.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
I would suggest another RT-AC56U (for around $50 to $100, on sale).

Or better, an RT-N56U as a 'bridge' (using Padavan's firmware) and another RT-AC56U as the router proper for your apartment's network.

You could probably find both (refurbished) for less than $100. Much better solution than the nano you tried. (LOS? Is this early days of 'radio transmissions'? :) ).
 

abailey

Very Senior Member
I would suggest another RT-AC56U (for around $50 to $100, on sale).

Or better, an RT-N56U as a 'bridge' (using Padavan's firmware) and another RT-AC56U as the router proper for your apartment's network.

You could probably find both (refurbished) for less than $100. Much better solution than the nano you tried. (LOS? Is this early days of 'radio transmissions'? :) ).

hmm not sure why this solution would be better than a Nanostation. I think it would be worse since the Asus routers are omni directional. Your going to pick up alot of noise and the signal your trying to pull in is probably only a little better than the noise floor.
Not having line of site is a problem. That said, the lower the frequency the better chance you will have of getting a decent signal. So 2.4ghz would be better than 5ghz (as far as penetrating walls). You could try a 2.4ghz Nanostation Loco. Also the regular Nanostation (not Loco) has more gain than the Loco. Also they are pretty directional at that short of a distance. Make sure you have it aimed correctly.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
hmm not sure why this solution would be better than a Nanostation. I think it would be worse since the Asus routers are omni directional. Your going to pick up alot of noise and the signal your trying to pull in is probably only a little better than the noise floor.
Not having line of site is a problem. That said, the lower the frequency the better chance you will have of getting a decent signal. So 2.4ghz would be better than 5ghz (as far as penetrating walls). You could try a 2.4ghz Nanostation Loco. Also the regular Nanostation (not Loco) has more gain than the Loco. Also they are pretty directional at that short of a distance. Make sure you have it aimed correctly.

As the OP says, it just doesn't work (when not in LOS). ;)

The RT-N56U (Bridge) and the RT-AC56U combo have proven their worth in many customer's installs to 'properly' extend a WiFi signal.
 

anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
As the OP says, it just doesn't work (when not in LOS). ;)

The RT-N56U (Bridge) and the RT-AC56U combo have proven their worth in many customer's installs to 'properly' extend a WiFi signal.

Sorry for the delay on this. I've been looking into getting another AC56U as per the suggestion, but am confused by a few things. Again, using ASUS-Merlin.

  • Can I use the "media bridge" route to connect non-media (e.g., laptop, printer, etc.) devices? That is, keep the AP upstairs, configure the one downstairs as the media bridge, and use that? If that is possible, why would anyone use it as a repeater (my understanding is that it halves the thoroughput)?
  • I haven't been able to clearly discern this from what I've read: does the media bridge work on one band only? Or is there a way to configure it to do both? Could that be the answer to the second subquestion above? :)
  • @L&LD: why do you say to get a N56U? Is that because Padavan's firmware is better for this purpose (even though I have the super-tweaked HGG ASUSMerlin? I ask because I thought I would need the exact same router...
  • Do you think it's ok to pick up a cheapo refurb'd unit instead of another full price, warrantied router? I'm totally wary of that. And as an aside, are there any sites other than Amazon that offer a total 30 day no plm return policy? Newegg and Fry's both look horrible (restocking fee, etc.).
Thank you!! :D
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Sorry for the delay on this. I've been looking into getting another AC56U as per the suggestion, but am confused by a few things. Again, using ASUS-Merlin.

  • Can I use the "media bridge" route to connect non-media (e.g., laptop, printer, etc.) devices? That is, keep the AP upstairs, configure the one downstairs as the media bridge, and use that? If that is possible, why would anyone use it as a repeater (my understanding is that it halves the thoroughput)?
  • I haven't been able to clearly discern this from what I've read: does the media bridge work on one band only? Or is there a way to configure it to do both? Could that be the answer to the second subquestion above? :)
  • @L&LD: why do you say to get a N56U? Is that because Padavan's firmware is better for this purpose (even though I have the super-tweaked HGG ASUSMerlin? I ask because I thought I would need the exact same router...
  • Do you think it's ok to pick up a cheapo refurb'd unit instead of another full price, warrantied router? I'm totally wary of that. And as an aside, are there any sites other than Amazon that offer a total 30 day no plm return policy? Newegg and Fry's both look horrible (restocking fee, etc.).
Thank you!! :D


Yes, you can connect anything you want to the router configured in Bridge mode. However, I am suggesting to not use it like that (too many issues, including stability issues that make for a less than satisfactory 'solution').

What I am suggesting is using a cheaper router (like an RT-N56U, as I have been using) and behind that connect another RT-AC56U (via LAN cable) to provide WiFi to the selected area. This is the combination that has proven bullet proof for me. I just happen to be using Padavan's firmware for the RT-N56U, but you can use any firmware that works. ;)

Does the media bridge work on one band only? Depends on the firmware and router. Doing it as I suggest above allows you to use all the features the second router offers though.

I too am wary of refurbished units. But if you can find one that saves you half to two thirds off full price and has a full refund within 30 days (or you can add extended warranty to for little additional cost), I would be tempted to try it (yes, very few and far between). Otherwise? May as well buy, at retail prices, what you can be sure of in the next few years (i.e. new).
 

anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
Yes, you can connect anything you want to the router configured in Bridge mode. However, I am suggesting to not use it like that (too many issues, including stability issues that make for a less than satisfactory 'solution').

What I am suggesting is using a cheaper router (like an RT-N56U, as I have been using) and behind that connect another RT-AC56U (via LAN cable) to provide WiFi to the selected area. This is the combination that has proven bullet proof for me. I just happen to be using Padavan's firmware for the RT-N56U, but you can use any firmware that works. ;)

Does the media bridge work on one band only? Depends on the firmware and router. Doing it as I suggest above allows you to use all the features the second router offers though.

I too am wary of refurbished units. But if you can find one that saves you half to two thirds off full price and has a full refund within 30 days (or you can add extended warranty to for little additional cost), I would be tempted to try it (yes, very few and far between). Otherwise? May as well buy, at retail prices, what you can be sure of in the next few years (i.e. new).

Thank you. Too bad about the stability issues; is that unique to ASUS and/or Merlin? Or to a media bridge versus another kind of bridge (I've read a lot, and all the terminology is blurring in my head...)?

My problem is that I am literally downstairs and across the building from the AP (my friend's apartment): a physical cable isn't possible. Do you mean connecting through a local area network, not a cable per se? I think the only route available is either a media bridge (using an ASUS RT-AC56U/R/W, right?--has to be same model...) or as a repeater.

Is there any other better option? I mean, if my bandwidth is slower, no biggie. Would just like to get dual band (since we live in an apartment where no one else uses 5.2ghz), and get something reliable.

Or if not, which would be the better option--get an identical router and try the bridge and if it doesn't work, just switch to bridge mode?

And "range extenders" haven't gotten so good that using that would be better than putting routers in repeater mode, have they?

Appreciate it your help (you have no idea....) !
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
I don't think I am communicating effectively (sorry). I'll try again below.

The main router (R1) is connected to the ISP and broadcasts on 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands. This is your friends connection.

The 'bridge' router (B1), which I suggest be the RT-N56U, connects wirelessly to R1 on the band that gives the most throughput and has the most stability. Try as hard as you can to connect with the 5GHz band, it will be worthwhile. Don't place too much importance on signal strength, the only thing that matters is throughput. Test with a large file (over 1GB) from a wired computer on R1 transferred to a wired computer directly connected to B1's LAN port to test the 'real' throughput the connection offers. ;)

The secondary router (R2) connects via a cable to B1 (LAN from B1 to WAN of R2) and this router (R2) is what provides the wired and wireless connections for all the devices in your apartment.

Doing 'bridge' any other way has proven unstable for me with many different routers and models (not all Asus, btw).

The above can be configured and used in a 'set and forget' mode, once it is tweaked for best placement of the Bridge (for highest throughput and stability back to the main router), best channel used for the Bridge (you'll have to balance that with the remaining available channels on the band you'll be using most with R2, and the channels you choose for the secondary router (R2) for best throughput for your wireless devices in your home.

Note that except for the bridge connection (bridge (B1) to R1), there are no other devices associated with the RT-N56U used as a bridge. I would also recommend you turn off the radio in the bridged router for the band you're not using to connect to R1 too.

Hope this is more clear?
 

anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
I don't think I am communicating effectively (sorry). I'll try again below.

The main router (R1) is connected to the ISP and broadcasts on 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands. This is your friends connection.

The 'bridge' router (B1), which I suggest be the RT-N56U, connects wirelessly to R1 on the band that gives the most throughput and has the most stability. Try as hard as you can to connect with the 5GHz band, it will be worthwhile. Don't place too much importance on signal strength, the only thing that matters is throughput. Test with a large file (over 1GB) from a wired computer on R1 transferred to a wired computer directly connected to B1's LAN port to test the 'real' throughput the connection offers. ;)

The secondary router (R2) connects via a cable to B1 (LAN from B1 to WAN of R2) and this router (R2) is what provides the wired and wireless connections for all the devices in your apartment.

Doing 'bridge' any other way has proven unstable for me with many different routers and models (not all Asus, btw).

The above can be configured and used in a 'set and forget' mode, once it is tweaked for best placement of the Bridge (for highest throughput and stability back to the main router), best channel used for the Bridge (you'll have to balance that with the remaining available channels on the band you'll be using most with R2, and the channels you choose for the secondary router (R2) for best throughput for your wireless devices in your home.

Note that except for the bridge connection (bridge (B1) to R1), there are no other devices associated with the RT-N56U used as a bridge. I would also recommend you turn off the radio in the bridged router for the band you're not using to connect to R1 too.

Hope this is more clear?


YES! In fact, I think that is the clearest answer to a noob networking qq I've ever seen (and I have been reading a lot lately). You should teach Networking 101. I think the key to your clarity here is r1, b2 etc., for all those who answer this stuff.

The only thing I don't understand is using an N rather than an AC. Wouldn't I have better odds of getting a 5ghz connection (and possibly a better connection over all) with an AC? For both B1 and R2?

And if you're familiar with HGG's TX tweaked asus merlin (seems to be kind of a verboten topic here, but I'll ask), wouldn't it be better to use that firmware (which isn't available for the N56) for max throughput? I've heard great things about padavan stability and stuff, though. Or would any dd-wrt or otherwise bridge capable device be fine, given that not doing the media bridge?

THANK YOU!
 
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sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
Hmmm... counter intuitive approach...

Put low gain antenna's on the AP side - makes for a bigger pattern for the "circle" - and high gain antenna on the client side for the bridge - and this goes against everything I've posted with regards to high gain antenna's (as most are focused on the AP side, which I still stand by)....

But in this case - keep stock antenna's on the source AP, and considering distance, going with a N150/N300 client adapter (let's say a "bullet") might work...

Alfa Networks has a couple of handy USB adapters that war-drivers like the following...

https://www.alfa.com.tw/products_show.php?pc=137&ps=225

This is a very high gain AC1200 USB device - in most home networks, it's not a good choice, but for the use case here - it might be...

https://www.alfa.com.tw/products_show.php?pc=34&ps=8

This one is older - and single band - but it's realtek chipset is well supported by Linux, and this is a great adapter for war-drivers - it's good for war-driving because of the sensitivity, but it's not a great choice for a home WLAN as it also sees everything else around it - but in OP's case, it might work...
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
YES! In fact, I think that is the clearest answer to a noob networking qq I've ever seen (and I have been reading a lot lately). You should teach Networking 101. I think the key to your clarity here is r1, b2 etc., for all those who answer this stuff.

The only thing I don't understand is using an N rather than an AC. Wouldn't I have better odds of getting a 5ghz connection (and possibly a better connection over all) with an AC? For both B1 and R2?

And if you're familiar with HGG's TX tweaked asus merlin (seems to be kind of a verboten topic here, but I'll ask), wouldn't it be better to use that firmware (which isn't available for the N56) for max throughput? I've heard great things about padavan stability and stuff, though. Or would any dd-wrt or otherwise bridge capable device be fine, given that not doing the media bridge?

THANK YOU!

You're welcome.

Sure, using an AC router would give you higher throughput (ideally). But the cost would be higher.

If you could get two RT-AC56U's and use one as B1 and the other as R2, at a cost agreeable for you, I agree that would be better than the RT-N56U plus RT-AC56U combo I suggested above.

The hggomes firmware is excellent and I have used it successfully for a few customers.

http://www.snbforums.com/threads/fork-380-57-hgg-final.29548/page-23#post-237427

http://www.snbforums.com/threads/fork-380-57-hgg-final.29548/page-18#post-235914


I also wanted to post a link for another 'success' story with hggomes firmware, but it seems like that post has since been deleted or removed. :(
 

anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
You're welcome.

Sure, using an AC router would give you higher throughput (ideally). But the cost would be higher.

If you could get two RT-AC56U's and use one as B1 and the other as R2, at a cost agreeable for you, I agree that would be better than the RT-N56U plus RT-AC56U combo I suggested above.

The hggomes firmware is excellent and I have used it successfully for a few customers.

http://www.snbforums.com/threads/fork-380-57-hgg-final.29548/page-23#post-237427

http://www.snbforums.com/threads/fork-380-57-hgg-final.29548/page-18#post-235914


I also wanted to post a link for another 'success' story with hggomes firmware, but it seems like that post has since been deleted or removed. :(

Yeah, WOW that thread got hot!

Anyway, one point I don't understand: on the RT-N56, is 5.2 fully supported? It seems like it would just further degrade the signal... trying to go with something much more cost effective but perhaps not as reliable per your suggestion. And I assume R1 would be the existing RT-AC, then two Ns for B1 and R2, right?

Hoping I will get it now...
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Sorry, what is 5.2?

If you were to mix different routers for R1, B1 and R2, I would configure, locate and setup them up in such a way that the strong points of each were taken advantage of in the main role they would be used in.

So, if R1 had great WiFi and R2 had great WAN to LAN and LAN to WAN performance, and the network usage dictated that R2 should be the main WiFi access point, I would switch R1 and R2 to place the routers in the most suitable role in which they'd be used. ;)
 

anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
Sorry, what is 5.2?

If you were to mix different routers for R1, B1 and R2, I would configure, locate and setup them up in such a way that the strong points of each were taken advantage of in the main role they would be used in.

So, if R1 had great WiFi and R2 had great WAN to LAN and LAN to WAN performance, and the network usage dictated that R2 should be the main WiFi access point, I would switch R1 and R2 to place the routers in the most suitable role in which they'd be used. ;)

I must be screwing up the terminology: 2.4/5.2? I thought that was the other band in the AC range. I'm not totally clear on the difference between AC and N (and strangely, can't find an explanation) except that AC is "better" and quite a bit "newer." Most ppl (I thought) had N devices but didn't have 5ghz channels or whatever enabled...? I'm confused by your post above that says:

I would suggest another RT-AC56U . . . Or better, an RT-N56U as a 'bridge' (using Padavan's firmware) and another RT-AC56U as the router proper for your apartment's network.
What confuses me here is that, to my ignorant mind, the N56U bridging two AC56Us wouldn't get a 151 etc. channel (to help avoid interference and thereby ensure a strong signal). Can you confirm that the RT-N56 does get dual band? That is, if I used it as a bridge to another RT-N56U, I would be able to get the 5ghz channels that are less congested? Seems like that's what you're saying, but I'm not sure why I shouldn't just buy a N56U as the R2, too . . . ? Other than the price, is there a reason why the N56U would be a better bridge than the AC56U? Or is it just the stability of Padavan? How do you think it compares in terms of range to HGG's--does it have the same sort of strength?

By the way I tried to pm you regarding something else but was not able to... said it "resembled spam" or something. Maybe because it makes mention of the "verboten" topic above? Argh! Will try again.

You are GREAT!

EDIT: screw it... can't PM you. Here's the gist of my message--feel free to tell me to leave you alone at this point :p.

Given the attitude about h..'s merlin fork is so negative I'd just pm u on this. In one of your posts you linked to in your response on bridging asus routers, you basically said that max coverage mode (versus max strength mode) was incredibly good. Given what we need, I had already set it for that.

But what would be an optimal setting? Is more necessarily better?--I've read some things that seem to indicate that too much tx can "overshoot" a connection. I'm at the preset (I think it is 70%) right now, but would 100% be even better? I've been periodically checking the temp, and it is at less than 80 Celsius, which I've read is just fine (although I don't know whether h..s firmware technically "overclocks;" I just don't want to burn out my router in case it does).

Also, bridging as per your so helpful suggestion (and assuming I'm using hardware that is compatible with h..'s instead of an N device), I'm assuming I should use whatever the ideal tx is on both sides, as well as the bridge?

And I wasn't just blowing smoke when I said you should be teaching Networking 101!!! Seriously, no one else was able to break this down for me at all.

I'm totally broke (on disability), but will seriously pay you to help me out with this if you're in Portland! I know you're paid to do this stuff and it is incredibly generous of you to help ppl like me out like this.

Let me know if you can. Thank you so so much.
 
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L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Okay, '5.2' you're assuming is 'AC'. :)

No, the RT-N56U is pre-AC. But it does support both bands with full channel support (depending on your country, of course).

In my further testing of max coverage mode vs. max strength mode, for most clients, the max strength mode proved to be the best, overall. Easy enough to test for each network environment though and use the most appropriate. ;)

Sorry, nowhere near Portland, but maybe there are others that may be interested in helping you directly.

To get back to the RT-N56U, you need to test which channel is the best for highest throughput and lowest latency in your network the 'hard' way. Choose a channel, reboot the routers/bridges/AP's and all computers (wired or wireless) used to test the throughput and latency of that connection and test again (making sure to test at various locations within the WiFi area needed and also that you can locate and orient the laptop exactly the same for each test at each location). Make notes of the results and when you're finished testing, simply choose the channel that gave the best overall performance for your network setup.

In many of my customers networks, using lower 5GHz channels (42 to 48) was often a better choice than the default wisdom of using the higher channels, btw.

It is a lot of work, but it will only cost you time, right now. :)

And in the end you should have a fast and stable network with minimal maintenance needed (like reboots, etc.).

Thanks again for your nice comments and, you're welcome. :)
 

mrpriceisright

New Around Here
After a lot of research here and other spots, I bought a Nanostation Loco m5 to extend the range of the wireless signal my best friend who lives in the apartment above me to my apartment, one floor down and just to the west (I am on a fixed income and he's generously agreed to share his bandwidth with me). Since we're in separate apartments MoCA is out (I checked the cable box), and it is an old house with no grounded wiring so power over ethernet is, too.

Configured the Nanostation Loco m5 as a wifi extender (like so). It works fine--in line of sight. I kind of decided to disregard the advice of Ubiquiti's techs regarding the necessity of having a clear LOS since I read so many reviews on Amazon that said it works fine without it. Would just try it out; if it didn't work, return it.
.............
Just to make things more difficult, my budget's under $150. Way under it, if possible.

Thank you for your help.


I see this was posted a couple of weeks ago but didn't see a final resolution.
I had a number of thoughts when reviewing this that I didn't see discussed.

1) powerline adapters are not excluded because you have 2 wire electric circuits. it just limits the speed to powerline av std ("HomePlug AV2 MIMO adapters will work with two-prong outlets, but they’ll fall back to SISO mode (which is 600mbps)").
So right off the bat, given that a pair of 500mbps powerline adapters can be had for less than $20, that would be the first thing I would try at minimal cost. I recently installed a couple and solved a range limit issue (~250 ft through 2 walls and a dense tree) where I had been using a range extender for some months as a quick fix. Installed the powerline adapters in minutes (the 2 power outlets are over 150 ft apart), got them synced and tested the remote end with a laptop direct wired cat5 cable. took a while longer to set up an old router as a wireless AP at the far end and saw a big jump in throughput to about 20 mbps end to end).

2) Personally for your requirements I would ignore any consideration of the benefits of ac routers etc, I don't think they are really relevant in your situation (only apply in good signal 5ghz situations).

2) I see you mention a 5ghz nanostation, I do see a mention of 2.4 vs 5 ghz in the thread but it seems to be overlooked in the other noise about repeaters and N vs AC. In my experience 5ghz is notoriously poor at going through walls, with rapid loss of signal. 2.4ghz is better at going through walls. This should also be fairly easy to test to see how the wireless signal strength looks on 2.4 and 5ghz bands, in the next room, corridor, level, etc, in the building you are in. I would expect 2.4ghz to be stronger after a couple of walls, though of course any walls will typical cause significant signal loss and LOS is always the prime choice.

3) I see that your main router ac56u, has fixed antennae. I see that as a significant signal problem, Asus has several routers in the family with removable antenna. I see two options at the router end.
3.1) leaving the main router as is, add a nanostation 2 as an access point, direct wired to the main router and 'pointed' at the target location. This would be paired with another nanostation 2 at your end, pointed at the router AP station. I believe the client station could be set to WDS mode to provide an AP at location 2. Others here will probably confirm that.
3.2) Another possibility would be to replace the main router with a replaceable antenna model and connect a panel (beam) high gain antenna to one of the ports. This configuration while having a significant signal improvement would still however have much less transmit power than a nanostation (non loco around 400mw?). You could also achieve this by adding something like a cheap buffalo HP N300 router with an external high gain antenna (panel or yagi) as an AP at the host router end.

4) A couple of nanostation m2's can be had for around $100. If as you say you have basically 3 walls to go through, I would expect that configuration to work, I'm sure others can confirm.

5) Although I have no experience with them, I see that Engenius made the M900 300 mbps bridge device using 900mhz frequency, specifically because of its ability to be able to 'get through' obstacles. These are pricey, and would be further down the priority list for me.

I see you got an m5. It is possible that 2 m5's (one at each end) might work, at least if you experiment with connection and throughput based on location (in the next room, in the hall, etc) you may get an idea of what should work.

In about a week I hope to set up a LOS .5km link, that I plan to use an Engenius an enh210ext with a yagi as the main AP and an ens200 at the client end.

So, in summary I would suggest, in order.
1) try a pair of powerline adapters, cost <$20.
2) if you haven't already done so, return the m5 and get an m2 (or 2 m2's) - oh and do get the non loco version - bit more powerful.
3) m900 as a last resort perhaps.

and please post results ;-)
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
So, in summary I would suggest, in order.
1) try a pair of powerline adapters, cost <$20.
2) if you haven't already done so, return the m5 and get an m2 (or 2 m2's) - oh and do get the non loco version - bit more powerful.
3) m900 as a last resort perhaps.

Ok - not sure how long you've been following this thread - but PLC is likely not an answer, as OP is in a different apartment than the source, so jumping meters isn't really a good answer...

He's also on fixed income, so little room to experiment with additional HW - this is not noted in this thread, but other threads...

Just so you know...
 

anoukaimee

Occasional Visitor
I'm the OP--we ended up setting the RT-56U up, maxxing it out with HGG's awesome Merlin fork, and things are going decently. I'm having other problems now due to the various and multiple devices we've got running, but let's just say I have a workable internet connection for the most part.

I ended up finding a top-rated range extender, the Netgear EX6200 (AC1200), for $69 on promo at Fry's. Still haven't gotten it, but it looks like a good device. Might've been better to try to bridge two ASUS devices running the HGG fork, but we'll see how it goes. Supposed to come tomorrow--yippee!

Thanks for all of your help, everyone.
 

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