cleaning out the dust

K-2SO

Very Senior Member
Google Datavac products. See what they are. Not that expensive on lower end. How you clean printers, scanners, optical drives, flat panels? By blowing dust deeper inside? You know how lifetime warranty works? Hardware for $500 sold for $5000 all inclusive. I've seen contracts for millions. Actual hardware is a fraction of the cost. Big tech companies are turn key service providers.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Oh, like the link I provided in post 2?

Buying $500 worth of software for ten times the cost doesn't equal a lifetime warranty. But I know, I rely too much on common sense typing this to you from my 'garage'.

Go to another forum to talk about the big tech company's policies. These are consumer routers we are talking about here.
 

Trip

Very Senior Member
Who'd think air would be such a hot debate? :p

As a cardinal rule, I like to avoid chemical-based air dusters, such as Falcon Dust-Off and similar, as well as any non ESD-resistant vacuums (an vacuums in general if possible), and apply as little direct contact to the gear as I can (preferably none).

Beyond that, the answer is really device/situation dependent. If you've got enough exit ventilation and proper air velocity then a filtered air blower usually works out fine. If dust evacuation poses an issue, then I may use an anti-ESD vacuum in combination with the blower (sucking up the dust as it gets blown out). For internal components that need micro-cleaning, an isopropyl alcohol soak and dry cycle usual works well, provided any batteries or other chemistry-based items are removed.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
@K-2SO, you believe you have such a contract.

But pre-buying ten units in advance while only having one (whether additional units are needed or not if you happen to get a 'good' one) doesn't make it a 'lifetime warranty' either.

You may be lucky enough to be able to pay for such luxuries simply as 'peace of mind'. Still has nothing to do with what a proper cleaning is.
 

CaptainSTX

Part of the Furniture
@CaptainSTX, look up the product I linked in post 2. A vacuum is worse by far for electronics and in my experience, does a worse job of cleaning too.
Thanks for pointing this item out to me. I guess I'm old school and never had any problems using a vac, but I don't disagree that it might cause a problem but I have never had an issue, but more importantly I don't have the urge to spend $105 for a blower.

I also wonder how electronic devices that have built in fans avoid the ionization issue. When my laptop's fan gets cranking the airflow is significant.
 

L&LD

Part of the Furniture
It's part of their design, of course, to avoid these types of issues. That link hints at some of this too with all the ESD specific attachments it provides.
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
I also wonder how electronic devices that have built in fans avoid the ionization issue. When my laptop's fan gets cranking the airflow is significant.
I suggest they are mounted to the grounded chassis and hence always draining/resisting the buildup of electrostatic charge. And, they never touch anything randomly... it's that single charged touch that blows things up! Don't vacuum your keyboard, especially if it is sitting on a grounded metal cart!

I'm not sure how wise my method is but it has worked for me over the years... I sit down, expose the internals, touch the chassis liberally to neutralize any electric potential difference, and then simply brush dust free with a 1 1/2" polyester paint brush in one hand while sucking floating debris out of the air with a vacuum nozzle in the other hand. Sounds reckless, but I think constantly touching the chassis keeps it harmless. No special sprays, perfumes, or devices required. Fan grills/vents are typically well-grounded to the chassis and can be vacuumed directly... if you trust the discharge path is straight to earth ground.

OE
 

K-2SO

Very Senior Member
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L&LD

Part of the Furniture
Not interested in how contracts work. Thank you.

Datacenter? No... consumer routers here friend. Try to stick to making one valid point instead of jumping around to prove you're right.
 

K-2SO

Very Senior Member
Try to stick to making one valid point
You act like ingenious indigenous peoples In Amazonia. If you have never seen something, it doesn’t exist. I understand. You’re right.

P.S. iPhone autocorrect
 
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L&LD

Part of the Furniture
You're using your words wrong, again. :)
 

dosborne

Very Senior Member
Dishwasher on "remove dust" cycle :)

Serîously, who would have thought such a simple question would drive a flame war on how to resolve the situation. Any of the above solutions would probably work, and be relatively safe, if used in moderation on a simple home router.

People, please chill a bit.
 

royarcher

Very Senior Member
I prefer to use a shop vacuum and suck the dust and fuzz out instead of blowing it deeper into a device.

I start with the dirtiest vent and clean it first so as not to suck the dirt from the dirtiest area into the device.
Good one captain we have a Dyson that really sucks, if you follow my drift, I would not have thought of using it that way but I am going to give it a burl
 

royarcher

Very Senior Member
Dishwasher on "remove dust" cycle :)

Serîously, who would have thought such a simple question would drive a flame war on how to resolve the situation. Any of the above solutions would probably work, and be relatively safe, if used in moderation on a simple home router.

People, please chill a bit.
Yes I am feeling a bit guilty for asking now but thanks for all the tips guys now I'm totally confused
 

OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Yes I am feeling a bit guilty for asking now but thanks for all the tips guys now I'm totally confused
Grab the router in one hand and vacuum off the dust using your other hand. Done.

OE
 

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