Ethernet Bridge WireGuard VPN

Uta

New Around Here
What I would like to do is place a wireguard vpn on either on my NAS (AS3302T) or on my router AX58U Asuswrt-Merlin (use port forwarding so only the NAS has the wireguard vpn) but neither have the capability for wireguard. As a work around I thought about one of those small GL.iNet GL-MT1300 routers which does have a wireguard vpn option and configure it like this: NAS >>GL-MT1300 [running wireguard vpn server] >> AX58U Router (all done via ethernet cable). Does this seem possible? The reason I want to use wireguard is to protect my Plex server on the NAS. At one point I did set up OpenVPN on the router with port forwarding but the remote access was too slow. If this is a daffy idea let me know, why and an alternative. Thank you in advance.
 

eibgrad

Part of the Furniture
You seem to be conflating the use of a VPN server w/ port forwarding. When you configure a VPN server on the router, you do NOT port forward anything. Instead, you get connected to the router's VPN server, which then gives you access to the LAN, which includes the NAS if it's a LAN device. Of course, Merlin doesn't support WG (WireGuard) as either client or server at this time.

Also, your example of "NAS >>GL-MT1300 [running wireguard vpn server] >> AX58U Router" suggests *outbound* access via a VPN, but that requires a VPN *client*, NOT a server.

If you want remote access to the NAS which is secured by a WG server, then I suppose you could establish the WG server on the GL-MT1300, then port forward from the WAN of the primary router to the service port of the WG server, which in turn provides access to the rest of the LAN (including the NAS). Just so long as the GL-MT1300 allows access to the WG server from is *LAN* side. Since I don't use that router, I can't say for sure, but many times oem's will limit access over the device's WAN. If that's the case, you'd have to place the NAS behind the GL-MT1300's WAN, on its own IP network. But that then complicates local access by requiring *local* port forwarding between your private network and the IP network of the GL-MT1300.

That's why in the long run, it may just be simpler to stick w/ the OpenVPN server on the router, despite the lesser performance. Frankly, I find while on the road that the amount of bandwidth available is so limited anyway, it doesn't generally make all that much difference. IOW, if your typical hotel or wifi cafe is only offering say 15Mbps, the choice of OpenVPN or WG just doesn't matter all that much.
 

Uta

New Around Here
You seem to be conflating the use of a VPN server w/ port forwarding. When you configure a VPN server on the router, you do NOT port forward anything. Instead, you get connected to the router's VPN server, which then gives you access to the LAN, which includes the NAS if it's a LAN device. Of course, Merlin doesn't support WG (WireGuard) as either client or server at this time.

Also, your example of "NAS >>GL-MT1300 [running wireguard vpn server] >> AX58U Router" suggests *outbound* access via a VPN, but that requires a VPN *client*, NOT a server.

If you want remote access to the NAS which is secured by a WG server, then I suppose you could establish the WG server on the GL-MT1300, then port forward from the WAN of the primary router to the service port of the WG server, which in turn provides access to the rest of the LAN (including the NAS). Just so long as the GL-MT1300 allows access to the WG server from is *LAN* side. Since I don't use that router, I can't say for sure, but many times oem's will limit access over the device's WAN. If that's the case, you'd have to place the NAS behind the GL-MT1300's WAN, on its own IP network. But that then complicates local access by requiring *local* port forwarding between your private network and the IP network of the GL-MT1300.

That's why in the long run, it may just be simpler to stick w/ the OpenVPN server on the router, despite the lesser performance. Frankly, I find while on the road that the amount of bandwidth available is so limited anyway, it doesn't generally make all that much difference. IOW, if your typical hotel or wifi cafe is only offering say 15Mbps, the choice of OpenVPN or WG just doesn't matter all that much.
First thank you for your detailed reply. It helps-- Accessing my Plex server on the NAS remotely ( and securely) is the goal. A 'remote' Fire TV/ or Firestick just does not stream my Plex media smoothly with OpenVPN. If I disable the router's VPN -- it plays smoothly. I'm not talking about a cafe and/or hotel but a friend's home who like me has plenty of bandwidth. I thought wireguard would be the answer since it is faster protocol than OpenVPN. Any further suggestions would be welcome. Thank you again.
 

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