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GL.iNet worth a try? Any advantage over ASUS?

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Justinh

Senior Member
I'm considering replacing my ASUS AC router. I'd like to consider an alternative, and the GL.iNet is the only reasonable thing I've seen as a possibility. I'd target the soon-to-be released Flint 2 (GL-MT6000).

My main concerns are security, manufacturer support, and client management in the firmware. I can't find an emulator for the Flint, so I can't peruse the firmware UI. (I like the ASUS UI and feature set.)

Does GL.iNet provide any advantages with respect to my concerns over ASUS?
 
Every home AIO router will have some quirks. Avoid brand new and pre-order products - you'll be the beta tester, guaranteed. You are asking similar questions for about 2 months already. Just replace your RT-AC68U with something like RT-AX86U Pro or better and continue with your familiar Asuswrt UI. Your few wireless devices and a single wired are good even if you do nothing. Your router is still supported and may be good enough for your needs.
 
The only possible advantage (depending on the model you get) it may have is the ability to be used in WISP mode. The ability to connect WAN via wireless.

Otherwise, the Asus routers are superior in every way (particularly with RMerlin firmware support).
 
Your few wireless devices and a single wired are good even if you do nothing.
I know this doesn't make much of a difference, but my net landscape is a bit more complex than that, not sure why I described it like that at first. I guess I was thinking of the typical load/activity at any given time. I do have more wired devices, more wireless devices, and some VMs (bridged).
 
No idea what your needs are. Your current router may be good enough or you may need a new one. Any ready-made solution will have pros and cons. Any home AIO router is disposable temporary solution. May last few years and meet your requirements well. You have to know what do you want and how do you want to proceed further. All you can get here is general advice. My advice to you - continue with what you already know. Less downtime, faster system configuration. If you feel this is not it - keep whatever you have running and explore other options. I personally will work towards x86 with pfSense/OPNsense with proper AP with VLAN support. Guaranteed to work Pro features now. Longer expected support and expandable.
 
Does GL.iNet provide any advantages with respect to my concerns over ASUS?

I think the main thing is that you can run OpenWRT directly if you like...

So far, feedback on both Flint and Flint2 has been fairly positive
 
I installed OpenWRT on an old router just to see what the original GUI looked like. I was looking to see how easy it was to do some simple tasks. One task was to toggle off Internet access for a client. Unless I am blind, the only way I could see to do this was to write a firewall rule for the client. So that was a bust.

I looked at the GL.iNet firmware docs and see they made the UI more user friendly and even have an interface to easily break (all) network access for a client. Still not what I wanted but would do most of the time.
 
I installed OpenWRT on an old router just to see what the original GUI looked like. I was looking to see how easy it was to do some simple tasks. One task was to toggle off Internet access for a client. Unless I am blind, the only way I could see to do this was to write a firewall rule for the client. So that was a bust.

I looked at the GL.iNet firmware docs and see they made the UI more user friendly and even have an interface to easily break (all) network access for a client. Still not what I wanted but would do most of the time.

Seems like a pretty lame use case, but hey, that's your opinion...
 
I recently got a gl.inet router as a travel router. It is a low end device - the Opal SFT1200 ($39 at Amazon). Yes it is OpenWRT which can be technically rich but challenging, but they have their own front end to it that is relatively easy and straight forward. Very easy to setup Wireguard interface to my home system and OpenVPN client for my paid VPN service. Can't really comment on it's use as my everyday driver - but definitely meets my needs for a travel router - supports WISP, small (palm size), decent range, configurable, and cheap.
 
I've had really good luck with their travel routers as wisp devices and the LuCl/openwrt features have been very handy- great value for functions they deliver... so far Gl.Inet has not over-promised or under-delivered...

early-on, I found three issues/bugs which they fixed very quickly (a few days) with an incremental-beta before rolling it into a release version several weeks later... very pro-reactive imo...

the flint2 came a few weeks ago but due to holidays I have yet to test it - so thanks for the link to the review which saved me time confirming the specs...
 
Specs look really nice and if the openwrt gets patches and improvements promptly it seem great value for the money. I read there was some 2.4 range problem possibly being fixed?
 
Not bad for $160 device. I like the small size too.
Good device, no doubts.
The question of the topic starter was about alternatives for upgrade of the existing ASUS AC router. As I can see the Asus GT-AX6000 would be a logical path and it is in the same price range as GL-MT6000.
In addition AX6000 has lots of benefits in Merlin FW, Aimesh etc.
As an example GL-MT6000 does not have a mesh feature. If mesh is required, Asus alternative is superior.
I use two of these devices and they work in Aimesh like a charm.
 

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