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Is the asus (RT-ACRH13) good router to buy?

aligh

Occasional Visitor
Hello
Is the (asus rt- acrh 13 ac 1300 ) excellent router to buy ? I want to buy it ? please advise me

I have some questions about the router :-

1- Can the router cover 3000 sq feet home?
2- Does it support Asuswrt-Merlin
3- Is the antenna removable ?

613uYipY3cL._AC_SL1200_.jpg
 
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OzarkEdge

Part of the Furniture
Hello
Is the (asus rt- acrh 13 ac 1300 ) excellent router to buy ? I want to buy it ? please advise me

I have some questions about the router :-

1- Can the router cover 3000 sq feet home?
2- Does it support Asuswrt-Merlin
3- Is the antenna removable ?

View attachment 20445
Seems like an average router. Asus sells better routers with more range, such as the RT-AC86U.

1. Maybe. But it does not support AiMesh so you can not upgrade it to an AiMesh system for more coverage.

2. Check the Merlin website for supported routers: https://www.asuswrt-merlin.net/about

3. Probably... looks like it... usually are. Otherwise it would be difficult to package and ship: https://www.asus.com/us/Networking/RT-ACRH13/gallery/

OE
 

Val D.

Very Senior Member
Yes I still search
Your router choices are significantly limited by the idea to use 12V power bank as backup power supply. Also, your home in your country is probably built from bricks/stone/concrete materials and even high-end expensive routers may struggle to cover the entire 3000 sqf area.
 

aligh

Occasional Visitor
Your router choices are significantly limited by the idea to use 12V power bank as backup power supply. Also, your home in your country is probably built from bricks/stone/concrete materials and even high-end expensive routers may struggle to cover the entire 3000 sqf area.
Yes you are 100% right . 12V power bank is killing my choices .
my home is from bricks.But some reviews said that the router covers 3000 sqf area.
why do you say even high-end expensive routers may struggle to cover the entire 3000 sqf area?
 
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Grisu

Part of the Furniture
Use a 19V step up converter or boost-converter instead with standard router, something like this: https://www.amazon.de/dp/B00A2PU4CW/

All those telling it can cover >1000sqf dont live in solid brick houses.
I have similar footprint and need 3 routers to cover all 3 floors (one each). 2 may be enough but some places would have too slow speeds.
Even now I have places with only 20-30Mb/s though on 2.4GHz .
 

aligh

Occasional Visitor
[QUOTE="
All those telling it can cover >1000sqf dont live in solid brick houses.
I have similar footprint and need 3 routers to cover all 3 floors (one each). 2 may be enough but some places would have too slow speeds.
Even now I have places with only 20-30Mb/s though on 2.4GHz .[/QUOTE]

Can this found on Amazon.com the American site, because I couldn't buy it from Amazon.de .
need three routers, I think this is a big problem
 

Grisu

Part of the Furniture
Please search on your own, there are many different ones to buy, it has been only a fast search example!
And before you need to know which router for its specs (voltage/ampere/connection-plug)!!!
 

aligh

Occasional Visitor
Please search on your own, there are many different ones to buy, it has been only a fast search example!
And before you need to know which router for its specs (voltage/ampere/connection-plug)!!!
What do I write in the search ?
 

Val D.

Very Senior Member
Yes you are 100% right . 12V power bank is killing my choices.
I believe you are going in a wrong direction by trying to solve per-device power needs. In a long run it is going to cost you a lot of money and the reliability will be low. Cheap power banks from unknown manufacturers, drained and recharged often, won't last for very long. You may have to replace them again and again every 12-18 months, if not more often. Also, advertised battery capacity on no-name power banks is always far from reality. You'll be happy to get 2/3 of that advertised capacity.

I would approach the problem differently:
1. 72Ah or up car battery (available, replaceable, will work for >2 years with no issues)
2. 220V automatic trickle charger (to charge the battery and maintain the charge after)
3. 200W power inverter 12V to 220V (to power small electronics and even LED lights)

Your one time initial investment is (2) and (3). Your recurring cost every few years is (1). What you get is basically high-capacity UPS that can keep alive all your small electronics for few hours. There will be power loss in power conversion, but all you have to replace eventually is the battery and you get the convenience to power any current and future devices you may have.

If you lose power very often though and for extended periods of time, no power backup system will work reliably. Batteries need time to recharge, no matter what type they are. The faster the charge/discharge cycles, the lower the life expectancy of the battery.
 

Val D.

Very Senior Member
Some examples:

NOCO Genius10 Smart Charger
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07W3QT226/?tag=snbforums-20

BESTEK 300W Power Inverter
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004MDXS0U/?tag=snbforums-20

The devices above are 110V for North American market, but I'm sure something similar is available on Amazon UK for 220V.

The best battery for a DIY UPS setup will be AGM type (Absorbent Glass Matt) car battery. They work longer, deliver more power, have wider temperature range of operation and recharge faster than standard lead-acid car batteries, but they also cost >2X more.
 
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Val D.

Very Senior Member
If the quality is same like their sinus I would give it a wide berth. :eek::D:p
None of those will produce perfect sine wave, but many will work with small adapters for different low power electronics. Even common commercial UPS products don't have sine wave output. We are looking for acceptable cost and working solution after all.

I see the marketing materials... get our product, nothing else works... yes, right. :)
 
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aligh

Occasional Visitor
I believe you are going in a wrong direction by trying to solve per-device power needs. In a long run it is going to cost you a lot of money and the reliability will be low. Cheap power banks from unknown manufacturers, drained and recharged often, won't last for very long. You may have to replace them again and again every 12-18 months, if not more often. Also, advertised battery capacity on no-name power banks is always far from reality. You'll be happy to get 2/3 of that advertised capacity.

I would approach the problem differently:
1. 72Ah or up car battery (available, replaceable, will work for >2 years with no issues)
2. 220V automatic trickle charger (to charge the battery and maintain the charge after)
3. 200W power inverter 12V to 220V (to power small electronics and even LED lights)

Your one time initial investment is (2) and (3). Your recurring cost every few years is (1). What you get is basically high-capacity UPS that can keep alive all your small electronics for few hours. There will be power loss in power conversion, but all you have to replace eventually is the battery and you get the convenience to power any current and future devices you may have.

If you lose power very often though and for extended periods of time, no power backup system will work reliably. Batteries need time to recharge, no matter what type they are. The faster the charge/discharge cycles, the lower the life expectancy of the battery.
thank you for your reply.
here in my country losing power is very often, almost 6 hours in Winter and 14 hours in Summer. but we have generator but not all the time work.
you mean this battery is not like ups , it doesn't work as directly when the power runs out.
 

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