ISP changed IP addresses and hosed up locale

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stevech

Part of the Furniture
Time Warner made a rare change to IP addresses (probably for all in my region).
I'm in So. Calif.
The new address is somehow (?) affiliated with Hawaii (but I'm not).

Thus, ads, speedtest.net, and other not expected things are hosed up now. Though I'd like to visit Hawaii again, I don't need ads for stores there.

Time Warner did this years ago, but the new locale was in Calif. but in a podunk town.
Weeks later, the locale affiliation shifted back to the correct city.

Why does this happen?
Where are these address blocks affiliated / registered? Part of DNS systems?
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
Time Warner made a rare change to IP addresses (probably for all in my region).
I'm in So. Calif.
The new address is somehow (?) affiliated with Hawaii (but I'm not).

Thus, ads, speedtest.net, and other not expected things are hosed up now. Though I'd like to visit Hawaii again, I don't need ads for stores there.

Time Warner did this years ago, but the new locale was in Calif. but in a podunk town.
Weeks later, the locale affiliation shifted back to the correct city.

Why does this happen?
Where are these address blocks affiliated / registered? Part of DNS systems?

Wonder if TWC is doing some rolling equipment upgrades or changing peering?

Similar thing happened to me a while back when Cox moved to Comcast for backbone/peering (they used to be Level3 if I recall)... once they completed their work, things settled out - but for about a week, it raised total chaos with two tunnels I had running at the time (Hurricane Electric for IPv6, and a L2TP/IPSec VPN bind)
 

stevech

Part of the Furniture
I think TWC's change is related to finishing out their DOCSIS 3 deployment. Mine's 100/10Mbps now, without an increase in cost (yet).
I'd expect TWC as an ISP has their own big blocks of IPv4 addresses.

In contrast, Verizon Wireless went to double-NAT of non-routeable net-10 addresses. Inbound UDP can't be done to my knowledge, on VZW.

@pete Per "whatismyip.com" my new address is in Hawaii. Whatever speedtest.net uses thinks the same.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
I think TWC's change is related to finishing out their DOCSIS 3 deployment. Mine's 100/10Mbps now, without an increase in cost (yet).
I'd expect TWC as an ISP has their own big blocks of IPv4 addresses.

In contrast, Verizon Wireless went to double-NAT of non-routeable net-10 addresses. Inbound UDP can't be done to my knowledge, on VZW.

@pete Per "whatismyip.com" my new address is in Hawaii. Whatever speedtest.net uses thinks the same.

The big worry would be Carrier Grade NAT's - the big ISP's know that those IPv4 blocks are worth big money, and with the IPv6 transition, they can go with large scale NAT's and resell those old blocks..
 

stevech

Part of the Furniture
So.. anyone know how an IPv4 public address gets related to a locale?
I'm not in Hawaii but TWC's newly assigned address causes whatismyip.com and speedtest.net to say I am.
 

sfx2000

Part of the Furniture
So.. anyone know how an IPv4 public address gets related to a locale?
I'm not in Hawaii but TWC's newly assigned address causes whatismyip.com and speedtest.net to say I am.

There's a number of different ways to include Geo information related to an IP - some is application layer, some is network layer, and there's always informative records in DNS...
 

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