Long range LAN extension

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Paul_Bravo

New Around Here
I want to set the table here: We live in the county and have very slow internet service. The best I can get is 20 MB/s via centurylink DSL. I am hoping my Starlink reservation come online soon!

Currently, I run the standard Century Link WiFi router in my house with a hardwired Cat5 Ethernet cable to a slave linksys WiFi router at the other end of my house. I also have a TPlink PoE plugged into the slave router to push WiFi out to my fire pit. We have pretty good coverage from one end of the house to the other, for what it is.

Question: I need to extend my LAN to a barn that is 500 feet away from my house, and then put another WiFi router out there. It has its own electricity meter and is in no way connected to my house, so I need to run a new line. Ethernet will degrade over that distance.

what are my options? I can bury anything in the yard and use a converter on either end of the new buried wire.

I have read I can use twisted pair wire or coax cable with an Ethernet converter at either end. I’m guessing something like this:

1. Connect slave router to Ethernet converter via short cat5 cable.
2. Connect ethenet converter to new buried cable (twisted pair?).
3. Connect new buried cable to a second Ethernet converter.
4. Connect second Ethernet converter to a second slave WiFi router with a short cat5 cable.

Does all this make sense? Recommendations on cable material and converters?

any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

itpp20

Regular Contributor
If you have power on both ends, run a fiber and convert to ethernet? Wifi of the endpoint.
With 500 meters over CAT you need at least 3 switches.
 

thiggins

Mr. Easy
Staff member
If you have clear line of sight between the house and barn a pair of outdoor bridges will work fine for 20 Mbps of bandwidth.
 

CaptainSTX

Part of the Furniture
Fiber is great but there are options out there for running 500 meters over copper using either coaxial or Ethernet with specialized adapters on both ends particularly if you can get by with less than gig speeds.

Evaluate based on the cost of the solution and your requirements.
 

Paul_Bravo

New Around Here
If you have power on both ends, run a fiber and convert to ethernet? Wifi of the endpoint.
With 500 meters over CAT you need at least 3 switches.
I think we are talking the same language. Can you help spec out the cable and switches on either end? Can I find them on Amazon?
Fiber is great but there are options out there for running 500 meters over copper using either coaxial or Ethernet with specialized adapters on both ends particularly if you can get by with less than gig speeds.

Evaluate based on the cost of the solution and your requirements.
this will work for me. I don’t need anything faster than 100 MB/s since that is what Starlink will max out at. Anyone have a history with this type of solution? I’m looking for advice and spacing out equipment.
 

degrub

Very Senior Member
Just so we are on the same page
MB=MegaBytes
Mb=Megabits
Is it correct to assume your rates are Mb/sec ?

I would look for transceivers that will support gigabit on two channels ( one each direction for “full duplex” ) as you may want higher bandwidth for local use. If that’s not workable, then at least 100 Mb/s full duplex should be enough.

you can get direct burial and run it through pvc conduit to provide shovel protection or directly lay it in about 12 inches and cap with concrete tile to do the same. Not sure which would be cheaper : replace the cable or repair by fusion splicing in case of a cut.
 

CaptainSTX

Part of the Furniture
I think we are talking the same language. Can you help spec out the cable and switches on either end? Can I find them on Amazon?

this will work for me. I don’t need anything faster than 100 MB/s since that is what Starlink will max out at. Anyone have a history with this type of solution? I’m looking for advice and spacing out equipment.


I have never used this type of adapters but if you search you will find many options. Above is a link to hardware that supposedly will work to 9,800 feet at very low speeds but at 100 Mbps out to 1,000 feet.

I have seen other options in the past so search including Ethernet over coaxial and if you find a solution that meets your needs see if you can find someone that has used it,
 

Paul_Bravo

New Around Here
Just so we are on the same page
MB=MegaBytes
Mb=Megabits
Is it correct to assume your rates are Mb/sec ?

I would look for transceivers that will support gigabit on two channels ( one each direction for “full duplex” ) as you may want higher bandwidth for local use. If that’s not workable, then at least 100 Mb/s full duplex should be enough.

you can get direct burial and run it through pvc conduit to provide shovel protection or directly lay it in about 12 inches and cap with concrete tile to do the same. Not sure which would be cheaper : replace the cable or repair by fusion splicing in case of a cut.
Yes, mbps.
I will bury it in conduit.

what kind of cable are you recommending?
 

Paul_Bravo

New Around Here

I have never used this type of adapters but if you search you will find many options. Above is a link to hardware that supposedly will work to 9,800 feet at very low speeds but at 100 Mbps out to 1,000 feet.

I have seen other options in the past so search including Ethernet over coaxial and if you find a solution that meets your needs see if you can find someone that has used it,
Thanks! That is exactly why I’m here! To see if anyone has used these things!
 

follower

Senior Member
Last edited:

CaptainSTX

Part of the Furniture
You also have to include the cost of the media. The per foot cost of direct burial coaxial is probably less than fiber and no special expensive tools to terminate.

 

Paul_Bravo

New Around Here
Oh no. That device is too old. These days we don't use that kind of old device anymore. Converter + Firber optic cable + (modules)= much better price.
I recommend this. Much better price, range, performance, lightning safe.
1. modules: no
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003AVRLZI/?tag=snbforums-20
2. modules: yes
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003CFATL0/?tag=snbforums-20
Pardon my ignorance…
What do you mean by modules yes/no?

I looked at both the products you linked and to me they seem similar (different fiber plug interface?)
 

Tech9

Very Senior Member
I do not have a clear line of site. Buried cable is my preferred option.

It is better to have a cable, but this project is much more expensive and may create issues in the future, like land development where the cable is. If you have any chance for pole mounted devices with line of sight, two Ubiquiti NanoStations at 500ft will provide 100Mbps easily, even loco M2 on 2.4GHz.
 

Paul_Bravo

New Around Here
It is better to have a cable, but this project is much more expensive and may create issues in the future, like land development where the cable is. If you have any chance for pole mounted devices with line of sight, two Ubiquiti NanoStations at 500ft will provide 100Mbps easily, even loco M2 on 2.4GHz.
Thank you! I am going to bury the cable adjacent to the driveway. I am also installing electrical lines to serve 8 light poles along the driveway. I’m not too worried about developing the land between my house and barn.
 

John Davis

Regular Contributor
You also have to include the cost of the media. The per foot cost of direct burial coaxial is probably less than fiber and no special expensive tools to terminate.


a lot depends on what grade of coax you use - also you need to look at total cost over lifespan and future proofing ( coax won’t be so hot if the op manages to get a better internet connection in the future). Given the amount of work involved I’d just pay the extra and run fibre and be done
 

CaptainSTX

Part of the Furniture
Cost of cable: Direct Burial Cable per foot

RG6 = $0.15
Fiber = $0.66
Cat 6 = $0.19

Given that the OP is running power on the same route I would install a small water proof enclosure mid span and put an inexpensive switch ($15 ) in the enclosure to act as an amplifier/repeater. Put some surge protectors at both ends of the run for a few bucks more.

The switch would probably last a year or two depending on the climate and would be much less expensive than long range adapters or fiber optic adapters.

Cat 6 cable would future proof for most people for the foreseeable future.
 

John Davis

Regular Contributor
Cost of cable: Direct Burial Cable per foot

RG6 = $0.15
Fiber = $0.66
Cat 6 = $0.19

Given that the OP is running power on the same route I would install a small water proof enclosure mid span and put an inexpensive switch ($15 ) in the enclosure to act as an amplifier/repeater. Put some surge protectors at both ends of the run for a few bucks more.

The switch would probably last a year or two depending on the climate and would be much less expensive than long range adapters or fiber optic adapters.

Cat 6 cable would future proof for most people for the foreseeable future.

fibre to gbe converters are cheap and readily available nowdays - I'd expect us$50 a unit tops (and that's presuming the switches each end don't have sfp sockets so you can just shove optics in directly)

as I said you need to look at total cost - the time and cost of replacing a midspan switch 'every couple of years' soon mounts up (plus there's the reliability side - you can bet it will fail when it's mid-winter and that last thing you want to do is go digging it up) - do the job once and do it right
 

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