Looking to expand ISP-installed ethernet over coax network; does this make sense?

adueppen

New Around Here
Earlier this year, I finally switched from cable to fiber. My router is located a fair distance away from the demarc, and so previously the modem was located next to the router and connected through the coax in the walls. During the fiber install, the technician installed some sort of ethernet over coax system at both the demarc and the room where the router is. I'm not sure if it's MoCA or G.hn (or something else), since I was busy during the installation and didn't get the chance to take a closer look.

I'm looking at setting up an additional access point in the house, possibly using AiMesh (since my existing router is an Asus RT-AC68U), and would be contacting my ISP to get another EoC box installed in that room, which already has a coax jack. However, I'm not entirely sure if the potential network topology makes sense, so I want to get a bit of a sanity check from people with more experience. My connection is 600/400, so it seems like it should be fine to essentially have up to 2x the data running between the main router and the demarc. However, having the router not being the root of the network does seem potentially questionable. My other idea would be to buy a third router and put it at the demarc, and have that be the primary router with the other 2 being access points. However, the demarc is at the back corner of the basement where very few devices would ever be connecting to it, so this seems like a waste.
 

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degrub

Part of the Furniture
You don't state your use case - Internet only, cable TV, or cable TV + Internet, etc.
Assuming Internet only -
i would put the main router at the demarc location and CAT6 cable between the demarc EOC and the main router WAN port. Then use whichever MOCA devices you like to extend the main router LAN connections to the other locations. If you have wired devices at your existing main router location and need wireless there, just repurpose a wireless router as an AP and use the lan connections (now a switch). Same for the other location.

This does several things - 1) isolates your MOCA network from any DOCCIS, if applicable, issues in the future and 2) gives you complete control over the coax, and 3) eliminates the doubling of traffic over the single coax segment. You can run MOCA2 bonded, turbo or MOCA 2.5 between the nodes in a physical star (no sharing, max throughput) or as a multipoint coax drop ( minimizes MOCA modems needed, shares entire coax layout across all users, shares total MOCA bandwidth). i would consider all MOCA2.5 devices for the latter case if you have really high bandwidth needs locally between users. Otherwise, MOCA 2 bonded, turbo should be fine for most internet use cases.

If you have to accomodate ISP TV set boxes, DVR, etc, then it is more complicated and for ease you may want to continue by adding ISP moca devices.

i would move the main router in either case to the demarc point. If you don't need wireless in the basement, either turn it off ( running three router / APs all the same device model) on the one or use a wired only router.
 
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krkaufman

Very Senior Member
During the fiber install, the technician installed some sort of ethernet over coax system at both the demarc and the room where the router is. I'm not sure if it's MoCA or G.hn (or something else), since I was busy during the installation and didn't get the chance to take a closer look.
I’d think this needs to be answered before pondering else.

Who’s your provider? And what devices (brand, model #) were used to effect the coax WAN connection between your ONT and router?

—-

Although… even though DOCSIS 3.1 and beyond won’t be an issue for your fiber install, locating the router where its WAN connection can be isolated from the LAN is sage advice, since the networks would be competing against each other for bandwidth on a shared coax line, best case. (So either relocating the router where it can be Ethernet-connected to the ONT … or … where the router’s coax WAN link isn’t required to share coax with the coax LAN.)
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
My other idea would be to buy a third router and put it at the demarc, and have that be the primary router with the other 2 being access points. However, the demarc is at the back corner of the basement where very few devices would ever be connecting to it, so this seems like a waste.
This would get my vote, leaving your coax dedicated to whatever technology you prefer to get your LAN extended over the coax.
 

krkaufman

Very Senior Member
But returning to your initial proposal, as an academic exercise (seriously, install the main router at the demarc :))…
I'm looking at setting up an additional access point in the house, possibly using AiMesh (since my existing router is an Asus RT-AC68U), and would be contacting my ISP to get another EoC box installed in that room, which already has a coax jack. However, I'm not entirely sure if the potential network topology makes sense,

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Consider that the “EoC” device at the ONT is connected to the ONT’s Ethernet WAN port and that the “EoC” device at your main router is connected to that router’s Ethernet WAN port. Therefore, simply adding another “EoC” device in another room will only afford that device a link to the ONT’s WAN — similar to if you were to connect the ONT Eth. WAN, router Eth. WAN and a PC to a network switch. This puts the PC outside the router’s firewall, not what is wanted.

What would be needed, assuming the chosen “EoC” technology allowed, would be another “EoC” device installed at the router location, also linked to the coax wall outlet *but* Ethernet-connected to a LAN port of the router. This would provide the “EoC” device in the remote room the needed path to the router LAN. Critically, though, the “EoC” devices would either need to support simultaneous networks over shared coax, or you’d need to find a way to physically isolate the coax WAN and LAN networks. Once working, additional “LAN” “EoC” devices could be added to extend the LAN to other locations. (So, 2 devices for the WAN link, and 2 or more devices for extending LAN connectivity.)

Finally… two networks sharing a coax segment will result in capping max throughput short of advertised speeds. (Gonna skip the detail, unless requested.)
 
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