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Meaning of the word BACKHAUL (re: mesh routers)

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wsalopek

New Around Here
OK - so maybe I should RTFM - or search Google, forums, etc.

I've set up dozens of wired and wireless networks over the past 2-3 decades (for myself and my friends/family) - so you'd THINK I might be aware of most of what makes a home network, work. However I only recently set up my first mesh network.

I thought the word "backhaul", meant, well, BACK-haul. In other words, it meant data sent FROM devices on the network, BACK to the main router. In OTHER words, I thought the backhaul, wired or wireless, did not SEND data OUT into the network, but only RECEIVED data FROM the attached network devices. That made no sense to me, but well, that's the plain meaning of the word BACK.

So all the time I was working (HARD) to get data sent OUT to a distant mesh router, I thought that data HAD to be sent WIRELESSLY, as using a wired backhaul would ONLY send data BACK to the main router, and would therefore be of no use.

Anyway, maybe 99% of readers will now be laughing their asses off, BUT, I really think using the term BACKhaul to send data in BOTH directions is highly misleading. I hope I'm the only one misled by that terminology, but I'm thinking I might not be.

A couple of days ago I used a pair of wireline adapters to connect the "backhaul" from the main router to a distant/mesh router, and now that portion of the mesh network is working MUCH better.

Good grief.
 
However I only recently set up my first mesh network

Hmm... what if I tell you most home "mesh" networks have mesh in the name only? What used to be a simple Repeater or Extender is now called Satellite or Node with Wireless Backhaul. What used to be an All-In-One home router now is called... you're right - Mesh Router! What used to be an Access Point is now called Satellite or Node with Wired Backhaul. You'll learn the new marketing terminology fast. No Google needed.
 
Thanks - yeah - I hear you. :) But aren't "repeaters" and "extenders" really different than a mesh? Those double the ping time because they "repeat"? Where a mesh sends the data back via a separate mode (the other wifi radio frequency or the ethernet cable)?

Thanks...
 
Hmm... what if I tell you most home "mesh" networks have mesh in the name only? What used to be a simple Repeater or Extender is now called Satellite or Node with Wireless Backhaul. What used to be an All-In-One home router now is called... you're right - Mesh Router! What used to be an Access Point is now called Satellite or Node with Wired Backhaul. You'll learn the new marketing terminology fast. No Google needed.
Such cynicism. :cool:

(You’re right though….)
 
"The term backhaul is often used in telecommunications and refers to transmitting a signal from a remote site or network to another site, usually a central one. Backhaul usually implies a high-capacity line, meaning high-speed lines capable of transmitting high bandwidth at very fast speeds."

What this doesn't explicity detail is the link's is bi-directionality; the central site - the router, in this case - handles one or more specialised or demanding aspect of the system, and the outliers (nodes) are simply collection and relay points. As OP seems to have learned is that the wired connections between central hub and nodes are often best, as signal latency over many wireless hops can make for frustrating experiences with data interruption...in both directions.
 

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