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QNAP TS-251B + Samsung 860PRO SSD 4TB

Discussion in 'NAS Buying Advice' started by Ryan Carlson, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. Ryan Carlson

    Ryan Carlson New Around Here

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    Hello, I'm looking for advice for the build in the subject line. I'm a landscape architect starting my own small office. It will be two people at first, then hopefully 1-2 more. We will run Adobe Suite, AutoCAD and other 3D modeling software. We will be copying and saving 1 GB files with several programs open at one time. I am considering Raid 0 for speed. BTW the router is a Netgear 7800. Thanks in advance. Ryan
     
  2. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

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    With SSD's, you want at least a three Bay NAS. HDD's are less expensive to recover data from than a single, large capacity SSD.

    The QNAP TS-332X would be the lowest end model I would be considering.

    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/nas-reviews/33214-qnap-ts-332x-three-bay-10gbe-nas-reviewed

    The 10GbE performance is lower than expected, but with testing and the newer QTS software available now, it may have reached an acceptable level?

    The real solution is an Intel i3 core with 16GB ram or better and 6 or more drive bays, but then we're talking about serious performance which will demand 10GbE connections to the client computers too.
     
  3. Ryan Carlson

    Ryan Carlson New Around Here

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    Thank you. I'm curious why a 3+ bay NAS is preferable to 2 for SSD. I don't think I need more than 8-10TB or storage. I'm looking for a small, fast, yet dependable NAS. Any additional insight is much appreciated. Ryan
     
  4. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

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    Two SSD's in RAID0 is inherently going to be less reliable than Three SSD's in RAID5. ;)

    In the two drive array, a single glitch could wipe out all the data. With the RAID5 array, one drive can die with no data loss (and most likely little to no performance loss too, over an Ethernet port, if they're all SSD's).

    How important is your data?
     
  5. Ryan Carlson

    Ryan Carlson New Around Here

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    Thanks. So I'm gathering the risk of a unrecoverable hard drive failure is significant enough to warrant a relatively small inrease in money for 3× bays for RAID 5.

    I do like the QNAP 332x for expandable RAM and SSD cache option even though the Asustor AS4002T seems generally faster out of the box.
     
  6. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

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    You're welcome. In the long run, RAID5 is the least expensive option. Downtime, data recovery etc. are more expensive than mere hardware. :)

    I gave the QNAP TS-332x as an example of the minimum I can recommend (at least to take a 'test drive' with, in your use). It may be all you need.

    But an i3 based 6 disk QNAP NAS or higher would be the much preferred long term solution. Remember, you don't need to populate all the drive bays initially. But when you needed to, it would be possible for the cost of a drive (or drives).
     
  7. sfx2000

    sfx2000 Part of the Furniture

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    One option with a 3 drive NAS is to use 1 bay for SSD cache, and the other two bays as RAID1... but I find 3 bay NAS as a curiosity that's not much more useful than a 2 bay....

    I'm personally not a fan of NAS with less than 4 bays, and I've had hard lessons on the fragility of RAID5 vs. RAID 10 - one can only lose one drive in a 4 disk RAID5, and I lost a second drive on the restripe/rebuild - RAID10 one can lose two drives and recover nicely.

    5/6 bay NAS - depends on price, but things do get better there with solutions for the storage pool.

    If one needs more than 6 bays, then one should reconsider the purpose and applications, as this gets one into more dedicated storage filers that are focused on enterprise class storage.
     
    L&LD likes this.
  8. sfx2000

    sfx2000 Part of the Furniture

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    L&LD likes this.
  9. L&LD

    L&LD Part of the Furniture

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    Very good points and I agree and use them all when helping a customer make the correct choice for their data.

    With 4 Bays and higher, you can consider more array options like RAID6 which also has 2 drive redundancy and RAID10 as you've already mentioned.

    Combining these with an SSD caching drive is also the best method for performance. That best practice link is very good. Thank you for showing it here.
     
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  10. sfx2000

    sfx2000 Part of the Furniture

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    RAID5/6 - you're limited on write speed to a single drive, read speed is very good... but on 4 bays, if doing RAID6, might as well do RAID10

    RAID10 - get the benefit of better write speed, and read speed is as good as RAID0
     
    L&LD likes this.